privacy

Line messaging app updated with end-to-end encryption

Line messaging app updated with end-to-end encryption

Line, the dominant mobile messaging app in many parts of Asia, has just announced that it's updating its service on all platforms to take advantage of end-to-end encryption. This protects the privacy of conversations between two users, and brings Line up to speed with other popular messaging services, including Apple's iMessage and the Facebook-owned WhatsApp. The new security feature, which Line has dubbed "Letter Sealing," is now available on its updated iOS and Android apps.

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Archos joins the enterprise fray with GranitePhone

Archos joins the enterprise fray with GranitePhone

With the launch of Silent Circle's privacy-focused Blackphone 2 and the upcoming fully Android BlackBerry Priv, Google's spiel of Android for Work is suddenly becoming more interesting. Trying to capitalize on this still nascent market, Archos has joined forces with communications and security company Sikur to bring out the GranitePhone. Like the aforementioned smartphones, this Android handset has security and privacy in mind, which is especially enticing for an enterprise scenario. The one catch is that it does thing slightly differently from what others are doing so far.

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Obama administration softens encryption backdoor law stance

Obama administration softens encryption backdoor law stance

It's not a complete victory for security advocates, but still a reprieve they could rejoice in. White House spokesperson Mark Stroh told the press Saturday that the Obama administration isn't going to push for legislation that would require tech and network companies to provide backdoor access to their encrypted systems. At least not yet. The government still stands by its position on encryption despite increasing opposition from advocates and companies themselves. For now, however, they could breathe a sigh of relief that they won't have legislature breathing down their necks for a while.

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Apple pulls iOS 9 ad-blocking apps over privacy threat

Apple pulls iOS 9 ad-blocking apps over privacy threat

Apple has removed a handful of ad-blocking apps for iOS 9 from its App Store over concerns about privacy and potential security breaches. The apps removed were ones that installed root certificates, potentially allowing third-parties to view users' encrypted traffic. This, in turn, could lead to man-in-the-middle attacks, leading to spying or malicious code being injected without users' knowledge. It seems the removed apps' developers may not have had malicious intentions, as Apple has said it's working to have the apps make a return.

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Your boarding pass might know more about you than you think

Your boarding pass might know more about you than you think

Airplane boarding passes may seem like harmless pieces of cardboard, but security blog Kerbs on Security says not to let your guard down. Those boarding passes may not hold your entire life, but they do hold the key to some important parts of it. The barcode on those passes apparently include a unique code, often a frequent flyer ID, that can be used to unlock a passenger's data, including his or her name, flight details, as well as both past and future flights, making them ripe targets for stalking or other kinds of unauthorized activities.

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Verizon Supercookie refuses to die, gets help from AOL

Verizon Supercookie refuses to die, gets help from AOL

Perhaps "zombie cookie" is indeed a better name for Verizon's much criticized "supercookie" scheme. The major US carrier received a lot of heat early this year when it was revealed how it used "undeletable" cookies to track users' Internet comings and goings for the purpose of advertising. The furor has died down since Verizon allowed customers to opt out of this kind of tracking. But now it seems that Verizon is ready to earn the public's ire again, revealing that it will combine its users' advertising profile into AOL's ad network.

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Potential chaos as US snooping snipes US-Europe data deal

Potential chaos as US snooping snipes US-Europe data deal

US government snooping has scuppered a controversial agreement between the United States and Europe, which for 15 years had allowed liberal data transfer across the Atlantic. The Safe Harbour system had been established by the European Commission between 1998 and 2000, allowing US companies to register their data protection certification as equal and equivalent to that demanded by EU law.

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15m T-Mobile consumers hacked: SSN and more taken

15m T-Mobile consumers hacked: SSN and more taken

The names, addresses, Social Security numbers, and more of fifteen million T-Mobile credit applicants have been stolen, the carrier has confirmed today. The hack focused on the servers of consumer credit agency Experian, which had stored credit assessment data of customers applying for service with T-Mobile between September 1, 2013 through September 16, 2015.

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Microsoft explains what data Windows 10 collects

Microsoft explains what data Windows 10 collects

Right from the get go, one of the most voiced criticisms of the new Windows 10, right next to forced system updates, is its privacy policy of, well, not being private by default. It had all the switches for sending data turned on, which users might unknowingly leave enabled unless they become aware of it. Responding to the negative reception of these "features", Microsoft blogged about the types of data it does and does not collect and for what purpose. Suffice it to say, not everyone might be satisfied with the non-statement.

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Privacy-conscious Blackphone 2 now available for purchase

Privacy-conscious Blackphone 2 now available for purchase

Silent Circle has promised and now it is delivering on it second attempt to corner the still niche market for enterprise hardened mobile devices designed to keep your data in and intruders out. The Blackphone 2, now equipped with a larger screen and more or less updated specs, is now available for purchase. Sadly, that extra bit of security and privacy does come at a rather high price than most high-end smartphones. But for some, particularly in the enterprise, that might be something worth paying for.

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France orders Google to apply ‘right to be forgotten’ removals globally

France orders Google to apply ‘right to be forgotten’ removals globally

French privacy watchdog CNIL has denied Google's appeal against applying "right to be forgotten" removals to all of its global sites. Google was protesting a June decision from CNIL (Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés), which saw the regulator threaten the search giant with sanctions. Google has been following recent European court decisions that gives individuals the right to file removal requests for certain information. However, Google was only removing search results from its European domains, such as Google.fr or Google.de.

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AVG openly admits selling user details to advertisers

AVG openly admits selling user details to advertisers

AVG has practically redefined what it means to offer a freemium service. While most products will just gate features behind paywalls, the Czech security outfit has found a different way to make money. And that is by selling some user details to advertisers. While it is hardly shocking to hear of companies cashing in on their customers' information, AVG's "coming out" is ruffling feathers as it now more openly admits to this worrying business practice. Sadly, it is a practice that almost everyone uses but get away with it because barely anyone reads the fine print.

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