privacy

Equation group creates “The Death Star of Malware”

Equation group creates “The Death Star of Malware”

According to the Kaspersy Labs Global Research and Analysis Team (GREAT), one piece of malware has infected thousands of victims throughout the world. The team suggests that it may be possible that tens of thousands of victims have been infected with malware made by Equation APT, or The Equation Group, through a number of "implants" - otherwise known as Trojans. These infection points are called upon by Kaspersy to identify the spread. Kaspersy calls this team of hackers The Equation group - their real identities remain a mystery.

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DARPA’s “Dark Web” revealing Memex tool is also pretty scary

DARPA’s “Dark Web” revealing Memex tool is also pretty scary

In the realm of cybersecurity, balancing national security and personal privacy is undoubtedly a tough act to pull off. The Internet has long been held as the bastion of free speech, but it has also become a breeding ground and hiding place for miscreants. So it isn't surprising that law enforcers would want to penetrate all corners of the Web in order to catch the bad guys. That is exactly what DARPA's new search engine called Memex is trying to do, by diving even into the depths of the "Dark Web".

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Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

President Obama publicly signed the executive order driving through new cyber security legislation today, using an appearance at Stanford to discuss the controversial balance of privacy and protection. The bill - already a topic of fierce debate in Congress, which had continually refused to pass it - demands greater information sharing between government and private industry, "sharing appropriate information" as relevant to ensure vital infrastructure isn't compromised by hackers or malicious governments. However, exactly what counts as "appropriate", and what impact that has on individual privacy, remains to be seen.

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Facebook Legacy Contact elects a guardian for your digital grave

Facebook Legacy Contact elects a guardian for your digital grave

Facebook is making it easier to handle your post-death digital footprint, introducing a new Legacy Contact feature which allows a pre-determined contact to turn a profile into a memorial. Legacy Contact builds on an existing option that converts the profiles of deceased Facebook users into stable shrines to their memory, allowing a trusted person to be nominated and that individual to then have some basic editing rights after a death has been confirmed. Alternatively, however, there's the option to have your Facebook account self-destruct when you yourself pass away.

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Smart cars pose a serious privacy risk, says US senator

Smart cars pose a serious privacy risk, says US senator

Cars are getting more and more sophisticated, incorporating features or integrating with our smartphones. They might also be receiving some of weaknesses of mobile devices, with more frightening consequences. Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts thinks that increasingly sophisticated high-tech cars are also getting more vulnerable to hacking, with all their wireless connectivity and access to personal information. And the even more worrying part is that, in the rush to put these technologies inside vehicles, car makers might not be aware of the dangers and might be foregoing stricter security measures.

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Hush, your Samsung Smart TV might be eavesdropping

Hush, your Samsung Smart TV might be eavesdropping

Smart TVs are smart, no doubt about that, but their smartness might come at a price. A review of Samsung's privacy policy, which, like many other such policies, are dense and full of legal gibberish, reveals that the Koeran manufacturer's intelligent entertainment displays transmit even spoken words to a third party. This means that everything you say to that fancy voice control feature is fair game to Samsung, that still unnamed third party, and potential hackers, whether you're telling the TV to switch channels or accidentally revealing details about certain undesirable family members.

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3 Apps for Hiding Photos and More on Android

3 Apps for Hiding Photos and More on Android

Smartphones are usually personal devices (and tablets more or less are, too), but not always, and even if they are that won’t necessarily keep people from snooping around. Sometimes you need to hide files you don’t want others to see, and though we won’t presume why that’s the case, we will show you how to do it. We're concentrating on Android smartphone and tablet users in particular with this article, but iOS, Windows Phone users and others can follow along.

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Facebook’s new Privacy Policy gives it more reach

Facebook’s new Privacy Policy gives it more reach

Facebook changing its privacy policies is nothing new, but once in a while it manages to hit a nerve that causes privacy advocates and governments agencies to take notice. Especially when Facebook does so rather silently. That might be the case last weekend when the social networking giant made some modifications to its Privacy Policy change that, though still in plain English, is somewhat ambiguously worded in such a way that it can be open to interpretation and abuse. By Facebook, of course.

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Outlook Preview for move has some security misfeatures

Outlook Preview for move has some security misfeatures

It seems that Microsoft might be developing a habit of releasing good news to be followed by the nasty fine print. It happened with Windows 10 and seems to be happening now with its shiny Outlook app for iOS and Android. Though still in preview version, the app has been discovered to have some glaring security practices would be a security and privacy nightmare, especially for companies whose employees might take a liking to the app. And while there's still time to address these issue, it might not be a very good first step for Microsoft.

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Verizon to allow customers to disable “supercookies”

Verizon to allow customers to disable “supercookies”

In a U-turn statement, Verizon Wireless says that it will soon allow users to completely opt-out of its mobile ad-targeting program, allowing them to delete previously unremovable customer codes, which have been unlovingly dubbed "supercookies". This move was in response to the growing criticism of the service provider's shady advertising practices, in particular the storage and tracking of uniquely identifiable user IDs or customer codes. Some privacy advocates, however, fear that this new policy still might not be enough to completely protect consumers.

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