privacy

Samsung 2016 Smart TVs will have new GAIA security solution

Samsung 2016 Smart TVs will have new GAIA security solution

It seems that for 2016, Samsung will be putting a lot of focus on its smart TV platform. After announcing that all its 2016 smart TV lineup will be IoT friendly, and that its SUHD TVs can even become smart home hubs, it is now revealing how it plans to safeguard all the private information that will be passing through those TVs. Samsung has just introduced GAIA, a three-layered security solution it has built on top of its Tizen-based smart TV platform that promises the same encapsulation and isolation methods it uses with its KNOX Android security framework.

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North Korea’s Red Star OS targets illegal foreign media

North Korea’s Red Star OS targets illegal foreign media

North Korea has long been developing its own operating system called Red Star OS, a Linux distro with a design blatantly 'inspired by' Mac OS X. Thanks to German researchers Niklaus Schiess and Florian Grunow, the operating system has been laid bare more so than ever before; the pair managed to download Red Star OS from beyond North Korea and tasked themselves with analyzing it.

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U.S. voter database leak leaves millions exposed

U.S. voter database leak leaves millions exposed

A leaky database has been discovered that contains information on more than 191 million U.S. voters. The discovery was made by researcher Chris Vickery, who found his own personal information among millions of others’ in the misconfigured database. Despite efforts, the source of the database hasn’t yet been discovered and law enforcement, at least at this time, doesn’t appear too interested in taking down the list.

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China’s anti-terrorism law does what US, UK could only dream of

China’s anti-terrorism law does what US, UK could only dream of

The US and the UK have only been planning and talking about it for years, but China has already done it. Unsurprisingly, despite strong criticism and outcry from the US and tech companies, China has passed a law that practically requires technology companies to have backdoors to encrypted systems and to hand the Chinese government keys to those doors should they be required by law. Almost ironically, the US' arguments against that law sound similar to the ones used by tech companies against the US' similar proposal.

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Alleged hacker charged with stealing scripts, celebrity IDs

Alleged hacker charged with stealing scripts, celebrity IDs

An alleged hacker has been charged with stealing television scripts, celebrity social security numbers, explicit personal videos, and more through the use of phishing techniques and malware. None of the victims have been named, however they’re said to include a comedy film, “hip-hop biopic,” professional athletes, and actors, among others. The data theft came to light after the alleged hacker reportedly tried to sell some of the content to a well-known radio host.

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Yahoo’s warning users of state-sponsored spying, too

Yahoo’s warning users of state-sponsored spying, too

Yahoo’s Chief Information Security Officer Bob Lord has announced that Yahoo will now inform its’ users when they’re the subject of a state-sponsored attack. The notifications will be provided if the company “strongly suspect[s]” an account has been targeted by a state-sponsored actor of some sort, giving the user a chance to protect his or her account.

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Now the TSA can force you to go through the body-scanner

Now the TSA can force you to go through the body-scanner

Your next flight might include a mandatory trip through the body scanner, with the US government quietly changing the opt-out rules for searches. In a document published earlier this month, the Department of Homeland Security outlined an update to the Advanced Imagery Technology protocols used by the TSA at US airports, adding a clause which allows officers to insist travelers go through the controversial machines.

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Apple speaks out against UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill

Apple speaks out against UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill

Apple, and many privacy advocates, might be facing a losing battle against governments pushing for a backdoor to encrypted devices and Internet services. The UK might be on the verge of passing a proposed Investigatory Powers Bill into law, which would require even non-UK companies like Apple to hand over keys to its otherwise well-protected products, even if such keys do not technically exist. If matters do take that turn, Apple will be forced to completely disable encryption on iPhones and iPads, iMessage, and FaceTime, which could have severe and adverse implications in more ways than one.

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Hello Kitty community breach leaves 3.3m users vulnerable

Hello Kitty community breach leaves 3.3m users vulnerable

The online community SanrioTown.com has suffered a data breach, and as a result 3.3 million user accounts have been left vulnerable. The website is a site for Hello Kitty fans, and as such many of the users are likely children. That didn’t stop someone from accessing the site’s user database and posting it online, though. Several other Hello Kitty websites were targeted, too.

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Rehashed bill could force tech companies to report ‘terrorist activity’

Rehashed bill could force tech companies to report ‘terrorist activity’

A bill has been introduced that, should it become law, will force tech companies like Facebook to report ‘terrorist activity’ to law enforcement agencies. The bill was introduced by Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Dianne Feinstein and Chairman Richard Burr, who stress that such companies won’t have to “monitor customers or undertake any additional action” to hunt down suspected terrorists. The new bill was spurred by reports that the San Bernardino shooter had pledged allegiance to ISIS on Facebook.

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The FTC just put an EFF board member in charge of explaining tech

The FTC just put an EFF board member in charge of explaining tech

Things at the US Federal Trade Commission could take a sharp turn toward pushing privacy, as the government agency makes a high-profile EFF member its Chief Technologist. Lorrie Cranor, who sits on the board of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), has been named the new Chief Technologist for the FTC, where she will be "primarily responsible for advising Chairwoman Ramirez and the Commission on developing technology and policy matters."

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Google refute’s EFF’s “spying on students” allegations

Google refute’s EFF’s “spying on students” allegations

This is quickly going to be a he/she said, he/she said case. Google has naturally responded to privacy watchdog EFF's accusations that the search company is semi-secretly tracking students' online comings and goings, despite promising not to do so and going against the law. Google even cites the support of some of the very people who penned the Student Privacy Pledge, saying it is confident that it isn't doing anything illegal or even morally long. And naturally, the EFF has also responded, saying its critics are missing some critical points.

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