privacy

What is a Cyber Pathogen? An FBI invention to defeat Apple

What is a Cyber Pathogen? An FBI invention to defeat Apple

This week the FBI has pulled out all the stops when it comes to getting Apple to unlock their iPhones for court cases. They've invented a term. The term is "Cyber Pathogen." That's not a real thing. They've invented a new term to describe something that cannot possibly be inside the iPhone to convince the government that they absolutely NEED to gain access. It's one hundred percent absurd, for real.

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Catching up on Apple FBI case: an 8-point timeline

Catching up on Apple FBI case: an 8-point timeline

Today we're rounding up all the details regarding Apple's legal battle with the FBI over iPhone encryption. This includes the one-sentence filing made by attorneys representing Apple this week notifying the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California that their clients "formally object" to an order to break in to an encrypted iPhone. Today we make it simple. Today we catch you up at the same time as we collect the data in one place for ourselves, as well.

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Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

This afternoon the FBI and Apple spoke before a congressional panel regarding iPhone encryption. This case has to do with unlocking a singe iPhone, says the FBI, one owned by a San Bernardino shooter. After a New York Magistrate Judge (James Orenstein) ruled against the FBI on compelling Apple to unlock this iPhone, the FBI and Apple went to congress to continue to speak on the issue. Apple's arguments have been straightforward. The FBI's arguments have stacked with fear mongering statements aplenty.

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NY Judge rules against DEA in Apple iPhone encryption case

NY Judge rules against DEA in Apple iPhone encryption case

One ruling is released in Apple's battle with the government over given access to encrypted iPhones in court cases throughout the United States. As we pour over what Magistrate Judge James Orenstein's 50-page memorandum and order means for Apple, we can also fairly easily interpret what it'll mean for all smart devices, including those running Google's Android. And Windows Phone. And Blackberry, if you wish. The whole lot.

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Judge: Apple can’t be forced to unlock iPhones under All Writs Act

Judge: Apple can’t be forced to unlock iPhones under All Writs Act

In a case unrelated but entirely relevant to the San Bernardino legal battle, a New York judge has just ruled that Apple cannot be forced to unlock an iPhone for the FBI under the All Writs Act, something George Washington himself had signed into law back in 1789. In this case, the matter revolves around an iPhone belonging to Jun Feng of Queens, New York. The DEA seized his phone while executing a search warrant on Feng’s home back in 2014. When it came time to search the phone, though, law enforcement was stopped by an increasingly contentious issue: the phone was, and still is, encrypted.

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FBI denies Apple case will set precedent

FBI denies Apple case will set precedent

Apple's contends that the FBI's San Bernardino case will have them unlock many phones in the future - the FBI does not agree. FBI Director James Comey spoke with a congressional panel this Thursday, suggesting that Apple's assistance in unlocking the phone of one San Bernardino shooter would not open the doors to future unlocking of devices as such. This situation, he said, was "unlikely to be a trailblazer" for other cases. Apparently Comey had not spoken to the NYPD before the panel.

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Apple’s Tim Cook explains that FBI request is like ‘software cancer’ in interview

Apple’s Tim Cook explains that FBI request is like ‘software cancer’ in interview

Apple CEO Time Cook appeared on ABC World News Tonight last night, and in a 30-minute interview with David Muir, he goes into detail about Apple's stance encryption, as well as why they will not give in to the FBI's demands for backdoor access into an iPhone that belonged to a terrorist. The television broadcast of the program only included a small portion of the interview, but ABC has now posted it online in full, and it's a must-watch for anyone closely following the Apple/FBI topic, as well as the larger issue of privacy and the government.

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In defiance, Apple works on making iPhone harder to hack

In defiance, Apple works on making iPhone harder to hack

Following the hoopla concerning Apple’s battle with the FBI over unlocking the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone comes a new report claiming the company is working on the development of new security measures that’ll prevent it — and the government — from breaching the phones. This will be a big blow for law enforcement and various government agencies, which have sought backdoors to the encryption.

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NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

The New York City Police Department says they'd like Apple to unlock every iPhone currently subject to a court-ordered search. Once the San Bernardino doors are broken down by the FBI, the NYPD has made clear: they want in, too. That'd mean every iPhone entered into evidence in a court case and subjected to a search ordered by a judge could be forced open by law enforcement, courtesy of a piece of software they've forced Apple to create. That software would be an entirely new version of iOS which the FBI (then the NYPD, and every other law enforcement agency in the USA) would then install on each iPhone, bypassing Apple's security measures, opening the locks to access data. You might be asking yourself, "why is that so bad?"

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Microsoft makes modest statement in support of Apple over iPhone encryption

Microsoft makes modest statement in support of Apple over iPhone encryption

The news about the FBI ordering Apple to offer backdoor access to an iPhone belonging to a terrorist, along with Apple's subsequent refusal, has been dominating headlines this week. On an issue that's sure to prompt ongoing debate about encryption and privacy, several other tech giants are voicing their support for Apple's stance. It took a bit of time, but Google's Sundar Pichai tweeted his agreement with Tim Cook's open letter on encryption, along with Jan Koum, the founder of WhatsApp. Now Microsoft has spoken up, albeit in a moderate way.

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3 simple mistakes that can break your iPhone

3 simple mistakes that can break your iPhone

Two iPhone hoaxes and one built-in security measure have popped up over the past week that you need to be aware of. For the most part, these warnings stick for whatever iPhone you happen to have: iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 5 and iPhone 5s - so don't take your chances. The first has to do with re-setting your clock to a date before Apple existed. Do not do this. Your iPhone will turn into a brick.

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Google pacifies Euro privacy advocates with Google.com fudge

Google pacifies Euro privacy advocates with Google.com fudge

Google's controversial "Right to be Forgotten" system will be expanded to the US version of the search engine, following a lengthy battle with privacy regulators. The tool launched back in May 2014, a way for European users to request personal details be removed from Google's index on the grounds that they were outdated or incorrect.

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