privacy

Dropbox Transparency Report for latter 2014 adds more details

Dropbox Transparency Report for latter 2014 adds more details

Dropbox is one of many companies that provides regular transparency reports, something it started doing a few years ago with a steadily increasing number of details. The cloud storage company has released its report for the second half of 2014 (July to December), and with it likewise comes an increase in details, the most notable of which is the inclusion of data on government data requests that come from outside of the US, making it more relevant for non-US users.

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1Password gets even better, now has easier login creation

1Password gets even better, now has easier login creation

For the security-conscious among us, 1Password has proven itself an indispensable tool. The app — available for iOS, Android, Windows, and OS X — both manages and generates secure passwords for you, and their new TouchID features are promising. An update, rolling out for iOS users today, brings in the ability to generate one-time passwords as well as some new features for their app extension. Sync is also improving , as is 1Password’s language support, in what the AgileBits team calls their ‘awesomesauce’ update.

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China is cracking down on VPN services with ‘upgrade’

China is cracking down on VPN services with ‘upgrade’

China has been cracking down on Internet freedoms lately, having blocked Gmail last month and been pegged for a man-in-the-middle attack against Microsoft's Outlook recently. A new report shows that isn't the end, however, with word surfacing that the Chinese government has now set its sights on VPN services. Some VPN users inside the nation have reported being unable to use their VPN service, and the reason is said to be due to a Great Firewall "upgrade".

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HealthCare.gov makes changes to data sharing following criticism

HealthCare.gov makes changes to data sharing following criticism

On Wednesday, word surfaced through The Associated Press that HealthCare.gov is shuttling some personal data input by users to third-parties like DoubleClick. The information was not tied to one's identity, and was comprised of things like whether one smokes, is pregnant, and where they live. The report was later confirmed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and it led to protests from those concerned about consumer privacy. In response, the administration has made some changes.

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Kim Dotcom’s MEGAchat promises encrypted video chats in browsers

Kim Dotcom’s MEGAchat promises encrypted video chats in browsers

Recent world events have gotten many tech companies concerned about security and privacy. Some of them have scrambled to add, enhance, or even enforce security measures like encryption while governments and their leaders, like Cameron and now Obama, have scrambled to have them blocked or at the very least weakened. Chat apps and services are one of the common targets and we've seen many old and new ones wave the encryption flag as a major feature. MEGAchat is just one of the latest to join that roster and it comes from a man who should know the situation all too well.

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HealthCare.gov is shuttling personal data to third parties

HealthCare.gov is shuttling personal data to third parties

The HealthCare.gov website is no stranger to controversy, and latest to that is a discovery that some personal details about users -- including how old they are, their state and zip code, annual income, parental status, and more -- are being delivered to more than a dozen third-party websites. The information was first revealed by the Associated Press, and has since been investigated and confirmed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF.org). The information is being shared even if Do Not Track has been enabled.

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Google and more join pledge to protect student data

Google and more join pledge to protect student data

Both Khan Academy and Google, as well as thirteen others, have joined the growing list of companies pledging to protect students' privacy. President Obama spoke about the pledge last week, and before doing so several companies including Apple and Microsoft had signed. A total of 75 companies had signed last week, and Google and Amazon were both criticized for not doing so. On Monday, 15 new companies -- including Khan Academy and Google -- jumped aboard. This follows the administration's increased push for data security.

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New radar lets law enforcement peek into homes

New radar lets law enforcement peek into homes

Privacy is a growing concern for many as technology -- and the snooping it enables -- continues to grow. It's no surprise, then, that concerns have been raised about a new radar technology that provides law enforcement agencies with the ability to "see" through the walls of one's home from the outside -- something sensitive enough to pick up breathing and motion, and to identify the approximate location of anyone inside. Police have been silently acquiring and utilizing the technology for more than two years, spurring complaints.

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Obama backs Cameron’s fight against encryption

Obama backs Cameron’s fight against encryption

Flip-flopping somewhat on his earlier stance against putting backdoors in software, US President Barack Obama took UK Prime Minister David Cameron's side in telling tech companies to give government agencies access to encrypted devices and communication. Of course, all in the aid of the fight against terrorism and in the interests of national security. The calls from the world's top government leaders came after two recent incidents that are directly related or being linked to encryption: the hacking of Sony computers last year and the shooting at newspaper Charlie Hebdo this month.

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President Obama calls for new federal laws on data security

President Obama calls for new federal laws on data security

President Obama thinks you should be protected if you’re connected. On Monday, the President called for the passing of the Personal Data Notification and Protection Act, which would require you to be notified within 30 days if a company you did business with as a consumer or professionally were breached. Secondly, the President wants access to your credit score to be simpler so you can manage your credit data should a hacker wreak havoc on your financial standing, giving you an early start on fixing the problems.

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