privacy

Smart cars pose a serious privacy risk, says US senator

Smart cars pose a serious privacy risk, says US senator

Cars are getting more and more sophisticated, incorporating features or integrating with our smartphones. They might also be receiving some of weaknesses of mobile devices, with more frightening consequences. Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts thinks that increasingly sophisticated high-tech cars are also getting more vulnerable to hacking, with all their wireless connectivity and access to personal information. And the even more worrying part is that, in the rush to put these technologies inside vehicles, car makers might not be aware of the dangers and might be foregoing stricter security measures.

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Hush, your Samsung Smart TV might be eavesdropping

Hush, your Samsung Smart TV might be eavesdropping

Smart TVs are smart, no doubt about that, but their smartness might come at a price. A review of Samsung's privacy policy, which, like many other such policies, are dense and full of legal gibberish, reveals that the Koeran manufacturer's intelligent entertainment displays transmit even spoken words to a third party. This means that everything you say to that fancy voice control feature is fair game to Samsung, that still unnamed third party, and potential hackers, whether you're telling the TV to switch channels or accidentally revealing details about certain undesirable family members.

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3 Apps for Hiding Photos and More on Android

3 Apps for Hiding Photos and More on Android

Smartphones are usually personal devices (and tablets more or less are, too), but not always, and even if they are that won’t necessarily keep people from snooping around. Sometimes you need to hide files you don’t want others to see, and though we won’t presume why that’s the case, we will show you how to do it. We're concentrating on Android smartphone and tablet users in particular with this article, but iOS, Windows Phone users and others can follow along.

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Facebook’s new Privacy Policy gives it more reach

Facebook’s new Privacy Policy gives it more reach

Facebook changing its privacy policies is nothing new, but once in a while it manages to hit a nerve that causes privacy advocates and governments agencies to take notice. Especially when Facebook does so rather silently. That might be the case last weekend when the social networking giant made some modifications to its Privacy Policy change that, though still in plain English, is somewhat ambiguously worded in such a way that it can be open to interpretation and abuse. By Facebook, of course.

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Outlook Preview for move has some security misfeatures

Outlook Preview for move has some security misfeatures

It seems that Microsoft might be developing a habit of releasing good news to be followed by the nasty fine print. It happened with Windows 10 and seems to be happening now with its shiny Outlook app for iOS and Android. Though still in preview version, the app has been discovered to have some glaring security practices would be a security and privacy nightmare, especially for companies whose employees might take a liking to the app. And while there's still time to address these issue, it might not be a very good first step for Microsoft.

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Verizon to allow customers to disable “supercookies”

Verizon to allow customers to disable “supercookies”

In a U-turn statement, Verizon Wireless says that it will soon allow users to completely opt-out of its mobile ad-targeting program, allowing them to delete previously unremovable customer codes, which have been unlovingly dubbed "supercookies". This move was in response to the growing criticism of the service provider's shady advertising practices, in particular the storage and tracking of uniquely identifiable user IDs or customer codes. Some privacy advocates, however, fear that this new policy still might not be enough to completely protect consumers.

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Uber’s internal privacy audit finds favorable practices

Uber’s internal privacy audit finds favorable practices

Remember that internal review of Uber's privacy practices the company announced back in November? It came at a time when the company was being slammed with negative press over comments made by Emil Michael, among other things, and aimed to help either point out areas that need improvement or put consumers' fears to rest. Fast forward about two months, and that review has reached completion and the results are favorable, with the outside firm that conducted the review -- Hogan Lovells -- finding the company's Privacy Program to be "strong".

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Google caves to privacy demands after UK investigation

Google caves to privacy demands after UK investigation

Google will change its controversial privacy policy in the UK, acquiescing to regulators who maintain the search giant's attempts to simplify its terms & conditions in fact left them half-baked. The agreement, announced today by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) in the UK, will see Google make changes to how it collects, uses, and communicates user data by June 30, 2015, with more adjustments over the coming two years. It's another pain point in what has been a nearly three year long headache for Google, which revealed its new approach to privacy back in early 2012.

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Reddit’s first Transparency Report shows few data requests

Reddit’s first Transparency Report shows few data requests

Because it's January, companies have been dropping their latest transparency reports detailing government data requests from the second half of 2014 -- we saw Dropbox's earlier this morning, for example. Reddit, being the massively popular website that it is, is no doubt hit with data requests, but as its first-ever Transparency Report shows, they're relatively few and far between. Despite having 174 million or so regular visitors, the site was the recipient of only 55 user data requests in 2014.

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Dropbox Transparency Report for latter 2014 adds more details

Dropbox Transparency Report for latter 2014 adds more details

Dropbox is one of many companies that provides regular transparency reports, something it started doing a few years ago with a steadily increasing number of details. The cloud storage company has released its report for the second half of 2014 (July to December), and with it likewise comes an increase in details, the most notable of which is the inclusion of data on government data requests that come from outside of the US, making it more relevant for non-US users.

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