privacy

Uber’s NY manager hit with “disciplinary actions”

Uber’s NY manager hit with “disciplinary actions”

Earlier this month, BuzzFeed reported that one of its reporters, Johana Bhuiyan, had her Uber data accessed multiple times by the company's New York general manager Josh Mohrer. Following the claim, Uber said that it was investigating the incidents, and now it has revealed that "disciplinary actions" have been taken against Mohrer. The nature of that disciplinary action has not been detailed, however, and Slate reports that Mohrer will continue in his role as general manager. No other official details about the matter have been given.

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Google “right to be forgotten” tool should be global says EU

Google “right to be forgotten” tool should be global says EU

Google's "right to be forgotten" tool was grudgingly implemented in Europe back in May, but now privacy regulators are pushing to scale up the web search censoring system to cover global results, not just those localized to countries in the EU. The ruling - which affects all search engines operating in Europe, though Google is the clear leader with an estimated 90-percent market share there - allows individuals the right to request the removal of links to information "inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant," and at launch saw 12,000 requests in a single day.

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Privacy puzzles and iPhone origin obscure finds Web IQ survey

Privacy puzzles and iPhone origin obscure finds Web IQ survey

Does a privacy policy really promise privacy, and is that Bill Gates or Steve Jobs? Turns out, not everyone is entirely up to speed on how the internet operates or where it came from, with new research from Pew Internet suggesting the US "Web IQ" is patchy at best. The survey firm checked recognition among internet users on topics like net neutrality, what Twitter's character limit is, and when the first iPhone was released, finding that while some topics are well understood, a lot of the basics could still do with some explaining.

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Google unveils tools that track and secure your online life

Google unveils tools that track and secure your online life

Used to be identity theft only revolved around cards and social security numbers, but these days our virtual identities are just as important and even more vulnerable. With the enermous power that it wields over our Internet lives, Google is in the prime position to help mitigate the effects or sometimes even prevent incidents from happening in the first place. That is why it is releasing two new security tools that will let users check up on their online activity and, if necessary, batten down the hatches.

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Lyft restricts access to user data as Uber debacle continues

Lyft restricts access to user data as Uber debacle continues

Uber has had a rough time lately, and for good reason. The company has been swept up in widespread outcry against its executive Emil Michael's comments about digging up dirt on journalists, as well as concerns over its "God View" that grants access to user data and, more importantly, has been reportedly misused in at least one instance. In the midst of all this, Uber posted a statement regarding its privacy policy this past week, something that caught the attention of Senator Al Franken. Also paying attention are the company's competitors.

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BitTorrent Bleep gets basic offline messaging

BitTorrent Bleep gets basic offline messaging

BitTorrent's secure work-in-progress messaging service Bleep has taken its first step toward offline messaging, the company has announced. Formerly known as BitTorrent Chat, Bleep is a peer-to-peer messaging app that promises to keep one's messages safe from prying eyes, something that in itself made offering offline messaging problematic. Though that issue hasn't been fully resolved, BitTorrent has taken a "basic" step toward offering it by allowing users to send offline messages...with one catch.

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Detekt tool hunts down government spyware on your PC

Detekt tool hunts down government spyware on your PC

Government surveillance is a hot topic, and as news about the extent of such monitoring keeps coming, many individuals have wondered at one point or another whether any of their own data is under some agency's watchful eye. To help (potentially) ease your paranoia is a new open-source malware tool called Detekt, which its maker Claudio Guarnieri -- with support from the Electronic Frontier Foundation -- says will help you determine whether your computer is infected. The malware detector is available for Windows users.

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Uber taps privacy experts to conduct internal review

Uber taps privacy experts to conduct internal review

Uber announced today that it has brought aboard privacy experts, among them being former IBM Chief Privacy Officer Harriet Pearson, to conduct an "in-depth review" of its privacy practices. This move comes after executive Emil Michael's comments about digging up dirt on journalists became public, Senator Al Franken's inquiry about the service's handling of the situation, and news about the company's so-called "God View" being abused as reported by BuzzFeed. The review seems like an attempt at damage control as customers and non-customers alike express concerns about the company and its respect for privacy.

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US DOJ: Encryption could get a child killed

US DOJ: Encryption could get a child killed

The US Justice Department may have tried to hit below the belt and appeal to emotion rather than reason by painting a gruesome future. Because while tech companies are working towards strengthening a user's privacy, the government is getting worried that they will be shut off from gathering personal information that could potentially save lives. In particular, the new encryption schemes being implemented by Apple in iOS and Google in Android could prevent law enforcers from getting their hands on a user's information in a timely manner.

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Delete your Tweets: Twitter Search is here

Delete your Tweets: Twitter Search is here

This week Twitter enabled the search of every Tweet in the history of the Twitterverse. This means that everything you've ever Tweeted is searchable. They weren't before now, not in their extreme entirety, now they are, for the first time ever. For most people this won't be an issue - they've never said anything embarrassing on Twitter, ever. But you - oh my goodness. You need to delete more than your fair share of Tweets, and you need to do it right now.

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