privacy

Apple on privacy: “You’re in control”

Apple on privacy: “You’re in control”

Privacy. It's a big deal, yes? The answer is yes, and Apple knows this. The numerous whistleblower leaks and government documents that have been raised over past years -- not mention all the instances of hacking -- have raised big concerns in consumers about their privacy and how big companies are handling it. And, again, Apple is reassuring its users that they don't have to worry. Apple understands privacy is a big deal, and it has detailed how your information is handled.

Continue Reading

NSA expanded warrantless internet surveillance in attempt to stop hackers

NSA expanded warrantless internet surveillance in attempt to stop hackers

New documents from Edward Snowden have revealed that since 2012, the US's National Security Agency has had an expanded ability to spy on Americans' internet data and communications, with no need to get a warrant. The documents were published in a New York Times article this week, and reveal that the NSA's goal is to find and stop hackers attempting cyberattacks from outside the country. Until now, this program was never disclosed to the public.

Continue Reading

Cook on privacy: we don’t want your data

Cook on privacy: we don’t want your data

At a ceremony organized by the Electronic Privacy Information Center or EPIC, Apple CEO Tim Cook was handed the organization's Freedom Award, a prestigious merit previously given to the likes of Edward Snowden and Senator Rand Paul. In a rousing speech for the occasion, Cook reiterated the company's stance on privacy and lost no words in calling out not only the US government's untiring attempts to get access to your data but also industry players' disregard for their own customer's privacy, in exchange for profits.

Continue Reading

Google launches go-to hub for lost phones and privacy

Google launches go-to hub for lost phones and privacy

Let's face it, even with all the remote locking, wiping, and tracking tools in the world, when your phone gets stolen you want one simple place to handle it. Google has launched just that, and with bells on it, in the shape of My Account, a centralized hub from which device security can be managed and account passwords changed, in the case of an emergency. However, it's for more than just emergencies, with Google also using the hub as an interface for all of its personalized tools and services.

Continue Reading

Uber’s updated privacy policy spooks some users

Uber’s updated privacy policy spooks some users

Uber, amidst its various unveilings and announcements this week, has updated its privacy policy to do two things: make it more accessible for the average user (in terms of length and jargon), and to highlight some changes that are coming to the service. The first part is welcomed -- the new privacy policy, which was first released last year amidst concerns, is half the length it formerly was, and has less jargon that might confuse riders. The other part, though, highlights upcoming changes that have spooked some users.

Continue Reading

Judge allows email scanning class action suit against Yahoo to proceed

Judge allows email scanning class action suit against Yahoo to proceed

Yesterday , U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh ruled in San Jose, California that two class action suits have enough merit to be brought against Yahoo as classes instead of individual suits. These suits were initially brought against Yahoo in 2013, but only now were ordered eligible to proceed. The plaintiffs allege that Yahoo scanned the emails to Yahoo Mail users that were sent from non-Yahoo Mail account holders, for the purposes of creating "targeted advertising." Yahoo allegedly scanned attachments as well.

Continue Reading

Google research reveals security questions’s vulnerability to attack

Google research reveals security questions’s vulnerability to attack

Google has just published research which puts the nail in the coffin of security question-based password protection. We like to think that security questions are reliable because the answers are easy to remember, but research shows this isn't the case. Not only are the answers to security questions often forgotten, but they are susceptible to attacks by simply guessing answers. These reasons contribute to the evolution of two-step authentication and SMS-based verification codes for quicker, more reliable password retrieval and authentication.

Continue Reading

“Creepy” Google robot toys would be your smart home butler

“Creepy” Google robot toys would be your smart home butler

Google is flirting with the concept of interactive robotic toys, that could provide a personable - or just plain creepy - interface to the smart home. The research, revealed in a recently published patent, is the handiwork of Richard Wayne DeVaul of Google [X], the search giant's unorthodox skunkworks lab: like a cuddly, moving version of Amazon Echo, the robo-pals would listen out for trigger words and then subsequent spoken instructions, capable of responding with not only speech but actions and expressions.

Continue Reading

Researchers design new Tor client resistant to NSA attacks

Researchers design new Tor client resistant to NSA attacks

Internet anonymity has become difficult to procure as the NSA is doing everything in its power to keep tabs on Internet activity. One way that people have been protecting their anonymity is by using the anonymizing network, Tor. It was popularly used to access dark web sites like Silk Road, but it can also be used for good. For example, people in certain countries without free speech protections could be jailed or worse for disparaging online claims against the government; Tor provides a way to prevent those users' web activity from being tracked. As it turns out, Tor isn't as safe from the prying eyes of big government surveillance as we once thought.

Continue Reading

Kim Dotcom just called out Clinton with Assange’s untold secrets

Kim Dotcom just called out Clinton with Assange’s untold secrets

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom speaks up about the 2016 Presidential Elections in the United States, suggesting that Julian Assange will call out Hillary Clinton with some "potential roadblocks." In an interview about a wide range of internet-related topics, Dotcom spoke with Bloomberg's Emily Chang this week on "Studio 1.0." This interview called upon Dotcom's earlier suggestion that he would be "Hillary's worst nightmare in 2016," while Dotcom suggested further that he'd "have to say it's probably more Julian," but that he was "aware of some of the things" that will inhibit Clinton's road to the White House.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next