privacy

Whisper lashes out over “vicious lies” about user tracking

Whisper lashes out over “vicious lies” about user tracking

With every information breach that happens involving government surveillance, one thing become increasingly clear: privacy is often an illusion, at least when it comes to your digital life. Whisper is one app that operates under that privacy illusion, at least according to The Guardian, which posted a large piece today calling out the company for what it says are numerous privacy violations, including handing information over to the government and tracking some users. Now Whisper has fired back, lashing out at The Guardian and calling the claims "vicious lies".

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anonabox: Tor in a box for maximum anonymity and freedom

anonabox: Tor in a box for maximum anonymity and freedom

Some lawmakers and parties have likened the Internet to the Wild Wild West in order to justify putting a clamp on it. For many users, however, that freedom is part and parcel of the Internet's nature and is necessary for it to survive. To help stem off attempts to curtail the freedom of speech on the Internet, not to mention growing number of spying on users, a group of friends have designed anonabox, a discrete and easy to use networking device that could give the NSA nightmares.

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Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Google was ordered by the Tokyo District Court this week to delete a number of search results that a Japanese man claimed tied him to criminal activity he was not involved in. The decision comes not long after a European court ruled that internet users have the "Right to be Forgotten," forcing Google to accept requests for deleting URLs to misleading or false information from their search results.

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Blackphone is working on a secure tablet

Blackphone is working on a secure tablet

The world has turned its attention towards the issue of privacy in the digital age, particularly one where the government is known to spy on data through all sorts of insidious and legally dubious means. That reality has prompted many different products tailored towards keeping private data away from prying eyes: encrypted messaging platforms, locked down email services, and, of course, the Blackphone. The folks behind the latter device have revealed to CNBC that a tablet is now in the works.

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Snapchat leaks confirmed: celebrities joined by citizens

Snapchat leaks confirmed: celebrities joined by citizens

This morning it’s been made clear that Snapchat has had a bit of a breach. Not through Snapchat itself, but through 3rd-party servers of Snapchat images. Snapchat does not explicitly allow the use of their servers or their services to any other 3rd party - but apps get through, and these apps have been breached. The developers of Snapchat have released a statement on the subject, suggesting that it was not their fault directly, but that they'd planned on continuing their assault on malicious fakers of Snapchat services.

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Panel says NSA surveillance is a threat to the Internet’s survival

Panel says NSA surveillance is a threat to the Internet’s survival

Imagine a future where a single unified Internet no longer exists, instead being replaced by locked down local versions that exist, primarily, to keep prying eyes away from data that is private. Such is one possibility posed by current government Internet surveillance, largely resting on the NSA's shoulders, according to a panel that recently gathered to discuss the issue. Senator Ron Wyden set up the discussion panel, and many big-name individuals from within the tech industry took part, including Google's Eric Schmidt and Microsoft's General Counsel Brad Smith. The topic is a serious one, and dire warnings were given.

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Adobe Digital Editions caught calling home with user logs

Adobe Digital Editions caught calling home with user logs

Home and mobile users might be more familiar with Adobe's Acrobat software for reading PDFs, but those who live on ebooks, particular in the EPUB format, also live in another program called Adobe Digital Editions or ADE. Popular (relatively) and widespread, this program has just been discovered to have one frightening flaw. Apparently, ADE transmits the app's activity logs to Adobe's servers, presumably for copyright protection purposes, but also seemingly includes unnecessary user data. Worse, it transmits them in a manner that can be easily read by unauthorized snooping third parties.

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AT&T employee illegally accessed private customer data

AT&T employee illegally accessed private customer data

AT&T has just acknowledge that it had a data leak, but unlike most security breaches, this one happened from within its own ranks. In a letter to affected customers, the US carrier informed them that an employee violated the company's strict privacy and security guidelines and obtained customer account information, which unfortunately includes social security and driver's license numbers.

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Waze trades user locations with governments in road insight exchange

Waze trades user locations with governments in road insight exchange

Waze will hand over real-time traffic data pulled from its crowdsourced driver community to select governments around the world, part of a new "Connected Citizens" program in Boston, Florida, and other locations. The scheme - which will involve anonymizing the traffic information, so that no single driver can be picked out - will net Waze greater access to official transit information, such as a heads-up on future road closures, as the Google-owned service tries to corner the market in driving data.

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First Chinese iOS Trojan Xsser mRAT targets Hong Kong activists

First Chinese iOS Trojan Xsser mRAT targets Hong Kong activists

Protesters and activists these days have flocked to social media and mobile technology to circumvent censorship and blockades that prevent their message from reaching other people. But now the tables might have been turned on them. A new trojan malware called Xsser mRAT that infects iOS as well as Android devices has been discovered to be of Chinese origin and is seemingly targeting Hong Kong's Occupy Central movement.

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