privacy

FTC: Lifelock failed to protect its customers (again)

FTC: Lifelock failed to protect its customers (again)

In 2014, the Lifelock Wallet iOS and Android apps were pulled due to concerns that they did not, despite being the company’s sole purpose, secure their users’ data adequately. That wasn't the company's first brush with security troubles, however. Back in 2010, the company settled with the FTC and 35 state attorney generals over "deceptive claims", and now the FTC has set its sights on the company again, saying Lifelock has failed to adhere to those settlement terms.

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CVS Photo temporally shut down following credit card hack

CVS Photo temporally shut down following credit card hack

It looks like CVS is the latest retailer to be affected by a data breach, as its CVSPhoto.com domain now only shows up with a message advising customers that the independent vendor it uses has been compromised. As a result of the hack, CVS has temporarily taken down its CVS Photo website, and says that during this time it is conducting an investigation into the matter. Customers who used the service with their credit card should be on alert.

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Etsy’s first transparency report details its crafty ne’erdowells

Etsy’s first transparency report details its crafty ne’erdowells

Etsy has followed the lead of many companies and has published its own transparency report, detailing the different aspects of its behind-the-scenes operations like complaints against accounts and user data requests. Etsy is different from many of the other companies that detail these numbers, though: they tend to be sites full of messages and personal data while Etsy is an e-commerce service. It isn't surprising, then, that a large amount of its numbers focus on complains about intellectual property violations rather than demands for account data.

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ProxyHam anonymity project bizarrely destroyed sans explanation

ProxyHam anonymity project bizarrely destroyed sans explanation

Staying private on the Internet has become a big concern for many and a problem for certain government agencies. The Edward Snowden leaks revealed a trove of data on government spying, and since then companies have moved to further encrypt data and many devices have cropped up promising high security. ProxyHam is one of those devices. The maker described the device as a hardware proxy that could be planted somewhere like your local cafe; it would use radio connections to transmit the signal up to 2.5 miles away, leaving the Internet user safely hidden. Now the project has been cancelled under bizarre circumstances.

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PSA: Disable auto backup when you uninstall Google Photos

PSA: Disable auto backup when you uninstall Google Photos

When Google formally divorced Photos from Google+, some thought it was the best thing to do. Others, however, thought nothing of it. It was, after all, just another way to give Google access to your digital life. While Google Photos offers a lot of conveniences and fun features, it does naturally require you to store your photos on Google's turf. Easy enough to disable right? Just uninstall Google Photos and you're safe. Not quite, because apparently, Photos doesn't exactly clean up after itself once you've decided to show it the door.

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Wi-Fi proxy could thwart cops, spies from finding you

Wi-Fi proxy could thwart cops, spies from finding you

The almost ridiculous extents which government agencies go through to get otherwise private data is sometimes being matched by equally almost ridiculous extents to protect it. Since Tor and VPNs no longer seem to be enough to protect user privacy, for good or for ill, some have taken seemingly drastic countermeasures. Like this Proxyham for example, which combines a Wi-Fi proxy with the concept of a HAM radio. Not only does it let users anonymously connect to Wi-Fi using almost unidentifiable low frequency radio channels, it also lets them connect from about 2.5 miles away.

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NSA can restart bulk data collection for 6 months, rules court

NSA can restart bulk data collection for 6 months, rules court

The American Civil Liberties Union is gearing up for a legal battle following a ruling yesterday evening by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court — according to it, the National Security Agency (NSA) can restart its bulk collection of American phone data. The ACLU is planning to challenge the ruling, and will be seeking an injunction against the program via the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Previously this court had ruled that the NSA’s bulk collection program was illegal.

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PayPal rewords user agreement after robocall criticism

PayPal rewords user agreement after robocall criticism

Paypal has announced that it is clearing up the wording in user agreement after being called out the FCC for illegal practices violating consumers privacy with the potential for invasive robocalls. Users worried that the because the text in the user agreement indicated they would be subjected to robocalls, that PayPal could be selling the personal data to external call lists. The previous language made it seem as though PayPal was violating the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

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Librem 13 laptop focuses on privacy with PureOS

Librem 13 laptop focuses on privacy with PureOS

Purism found success with its Librem 15 laptop last year, a machine hawked at those concerned with privacy more so than a brand name or a popular OS; it runs an operating system based on Linux called PureOS, which is both free and open source. The laptop has been rehashed as a smaller version which is called the Librem 13. As with the bigger version, Purism is seeking funding for the new version via crowdfunding. So far it has hit nearly a fifth of its goal.

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Privacy fears halt Facebook Moments in Europe

Privacy fears halt Facebook Moments in Europe

Facebook Moments' smart people-spotting AI won't fly in Europe, with the smartphone app not being released until users can opt-out of facial recognition. The software, launched earlier this month for iOS and Android devices, promises to fill in the gaps in your galleries by combining pictures and video taken by multiple people all attending the same event. To do that, Moments uses its increasingly accurate face-recognition tech, and it's the legality of that which has the app's European launch on hold.

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Amazon’s first transparency report plays coy with details

Amazon’s first transparency report plays coy with details

Amazon has opened up on customer privacy, issuing its first ever transparency report and denying ever having participated in the notorious NSA PRISM program. While the online shopping behemoth may be best known by most consumers for its retail division, the other side to Jeff Bezos' empire is a huge cloud business, offering server and hosting services to startups and established names in enterprise alike. It's the reputation of that which Amazon is hoping to gild now.

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France pressures Google to make ‘right to be forgotten’ delistings global

France pressures Google to make ‘right to be forgotten’ delistings global

As Google has been slowly following orders from European courts in honoring "right to be forgotten" requests, France has found the search engine giant may not be doing all it can to remove unwanted links. French privacy watchdog CNIL says that when Google does delist a requested link, they are only removing it from search results within Europe. The regulator has ordered Google to make the delistings apply globally within 15 days, or sanctions will be imposed.

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