privacy

Angry Birds NSA sharing strongly denied by Rovio

Angry Birds NSA sharing strongly denied by Rovio

Upon hearing that they were the latest subject in the seemingly never-ending strand of suggestions for NSA entry points into your daily life, Rovio has suggested that they've had nothing to do with Angry Birds user-data insecurities. Rovio has gone so far as to point their finger, instead, at third party advertising networks. It's through them, they say, that it's possible Angry Birds user data has been pushed.

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DOJ statement: public interest outweighs security concerns

DOJ statement: public interest outweighs security concerns

In accordance with orders sent out earlier this month by the President of the United States on intelligence reforms, the US Department of Justice has begun "acting to allow" more transparency in a number of areas. The number of "national security orders and requests" sent to communications providers as well as the number of customer accounts that that are targeted will be part of this set of "more detailed disclosures."

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TorMail’s entire database nabbed by FBI, reveals court documents

TorMail’s entire database nabbed by FBI, reveals court documents

Security concerns in the digital world are a valid area of focus, and many both before and after the Snowden epic elected to use encrypted email services over the more typical Gmail and Outlook offerings. One such mail service is TorMail, namesake of the popular onion-routing Tor (though an independent project), which offers anonymous messaging. According to court documents that recently surfaced, the FBI has cloned the entire email database.

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Apple’s Tim Cook interview on NSA begins with “no back door”

Apple’s Tim Cook interview on NSA begins with “no back door”

Today on the 30th anniversary of the introduction of the Mac computer to the world by Apple, Tim Cook has taken to ABC to speak not only about oddities like Sapphire Crystal, he's come to speak about the NSA as well. After having actually headed to the White House on the 17th of December, 2013, to speak with the President about the National Security Agency's surveillance programs, here Cook suggests that he wishes he could say more.

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Snowden talks government, privacy, and having no regrets during live Q&A

Snowden talks government, privacy, and having no regrets during live Q&A

Since leaking a myriad of documents on NSA and government surveillance and taking roost in Russia, Edward Snowden has kept a low profile -- until today. Via Twitter, the former NSA contractor was asked a slew of questions under the #AskSnowden hashtag, a handful of which he proceeded to answer with sufficiently long responses, including the proclamation that he has "no regrets".

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Privacy watchdog finds NSA program ineffective and illegal

Privacy watchdog finds NSA program ineffective and illegal

Just a few days after Obama's awaited, and disappointing to some, speech about the NSA's program, an independent federal body came out with its own rather scathing analysis of the divisive program. According to the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, the NSA's phone record collection spree in the name of counter-terrorism is not only ineffective but also illegal and needs to be shutdown.

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Chrome browser may be listening in (but don’t burn your mic yet)

Chrome browser may be listening in (but don’t burn your mic yet)

Google's Chrome browser is under fire after speech recognition researchers identified a vulnerability that allows websites to clandestinely record users through their computer's microphone, though some have questioned quite how serious the exploit actually is. Google has known about - and even had a working fix - the flaw for four months, Tal Ater claims, but for the moment sites that are given permission to access the user's microphone can go on recording from it even after the primary tab is closed.

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Microsoft to let foreign customers store data on non-US servers following NSA debacle

Microsoft to let foreign customers store data on non-US servers following NSA debacle

Microsoft has made a decision that runs afoul of many tech companies' sensibilities -- allowing foreign customers to have their data stored on non-US servers. Such a decision was prompted by the NSA hoopla over the past months and concerns about customers' privacy. Spying revelations caused a backlash across the globe, and tech companies became the focus of much of that ire, spurring actions such as this.

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