privacy

Snapchat promises new app to fix privacy exploit

Snapchat promises new app to fix privacy exploit

Snapchat has finally responded to the ongoing hack controversy that saw usernames and matching phone numbers of over four million users leaked in recent days, promising an updated version of the app to address privacy concerns. The new Snapchat will allow users to opt out of appearing in the "Find Friends" feature which worked as the gateway to the exploit, Snapchat said today, with other protections like rate limiting for how many numbers can be compared with accounts also improved.

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Snapchat leak checker ID’s hacked accounts

Snapchat leak checker ID’s hacked accounts

A new tool to allow Snapchat users to check whether their username and cellphone number have been compromised in the recent database hack has been launched, with an estimated 4.6m accounts supposedly leaked. The tool, developed by password management firm LastPass, checks a Snapchat username against the millions of accounts that were exposed using a security loophole the company was supposedly made aware of back in August 2013, but which it only addressed - at least partially - in recent days after the exploit was made public.

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Laptop searches by U.S. border agents ruled legal

Laptop searches by U.S. border agents ruled legal

For most people, one's laptop is a like a trusted friend, packed full of data that one would not give out part and parcel to just anyone, particularly not strangers. Random laptop searches at United States borders have been taking place for years, and have been the subject of much outcry, particularly due to the complete lack of suspicion needed to perform the search. Civil rights attorneys filed a lawsuit against this activity, citing reasons of being unconstitutional, but a New York judge has dismissed their complaint, giving border agents the go-ahead.

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Snapchat scraped: 4.6m usernames and numbers reportedly grabbed

Snapchat scraped: 4.6m usernames and numbers reportedly grabbed

The Snapchat exploit revealed last week has seemingly exposed the usernames and cellphone numbers of a claimed 4.6 million users of the self-destructing messaging service, according to a site that supposedly snatched the information from the company's database using the hack. Dubbed SnapchatDB!, the site offers up a download of what's described as "a vast majority" of Snapchat users, purportedly to highlight the lax security liberties companies take with our personal information.

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Apple denies opening NSA backdoor to iPhone

Apple denies opening NSA backdoor to iPhone

Apple has denied collaborating with the NSA to add a snooping backdoor to the iPhone, insisting that despite allegations that the DROPOUTJEEP program could access large swathes of iPhone content without the user realizing, it is unaware of any such exploit. New leaks from NSA documents acquired by whistleblower Edward Snowden led to claims earlier this week that the NSA had a tool that could access data like text messages, location, and more with "100-percent success," something Apple strongly denies either facilitating or, indeed, knowing was in operation.

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McAfee and Bletchley Park under fire over cyber security Snowden snub

McAfee and Bletchley Park under fire over cyber security Snowden snub

Attempts to edit Edward Snowden out of cyber security history have prompted fierce debate about the role played by the NSA whistleblower, after famed spy museum Bletchley Park opted not to include the 2013 revelations and his role in them in a new exhibit. Bletchley Park, today a museum but formerly the clandestine UK site where Alan Turing and others cracked the Nazi's Enigma code and arguably turned the fate of the Second World War, has courted controversy by electing to omit Snowden's part in digital security in a new gallery, out of concerns that doing so might be interpreted as condoning his leaks.

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Hulu will face privacy suit in court

Hulu will face privacy suit in court

Hulu has been fighting to get a case thrown out that as to do with it allegedly sharing the viewing habits of its users illegally. The plaintiffs in the case claim that Hulu illegally shared viewing habits of its users with Facebook and comScore. Hulu had gone before a US Magistrate Judge named Laurel Beeler in an attempt to get the suit dismissed.

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RSA denies NSA collusion over backdoor code access

RSA denies NSA collusion over backdoor code access

Security firm RSA has categorically denied colluding with the US National Security Agency (NSA) after allegations that the company accepted $10m of government cash in order to make compromised code its default. Reports late last week suggested RSA had been paid by the NSA to adopt a random number generator that the agency had purposefully left backdoor access to, something the company strenuously denies.

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Verizon will begin issuing transparency reports on government data requests in 2014

Verizon will begin issuing transparency reports on government data requests in 2014

There has been a lot of talk going on around the country on the number of requests that the government is making for call data held by wireless carriers like Verizon. Verizon has announced that it will start publishing transparency reports on government data requests in 2014. Verizon will be the first wireless carrier to publish this sort of report if it follows through with the promise.

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Google accuses governments of attempting search censorship

Google accuses governments of attempting search censorship

Google has released its eighth Transparency Report, its public disclosure of how much content governments request be removed from the search giant's database. 3,846 government requests were filed between January and June 2013, Google says, covering a total of 24,737 items of content. That, Google legal director Susan Infantino wrote today, is a 68-percent increase over the preceding six months. As Infantino points out, it's a sign of a "worrying trend" that remains.

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