privacy

Police can create fake Instagram accounts without warrant, says US judge

Police can create fake Instagram accounts without warrant, says US judge

A significant topic has developed over the last few months over the legality of whether law enforcement can create fake social network accounts to impersonate people for the purpose of trapping criminals. A new contribution to that discussion has been made after a US district judge said that police officers don't need to get search warrants in order to create a fake Instagram account and view the photos a suspect shares on the service. This decision will already have a direct effect on a case involving a suspect posting photos of stolen cash and jewelry.

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Uber responds to Sen. Al Franken’s questions

Uber responds to Sen. Al Franken’s questions

Though facing more recent criticism, Uber is still dealing with the fallout from last month's various troubles. The hoopla had managed to attract the attention of Senator Al Franken, who sent the ridesharing service a letter expressing concerns about privacy, as well as a series of questions. Sen. Franken requested a response to his questions by December 15, and down to the deadline Uber has sent back a reply, saying it "welcomes the opportunity to respond".

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Study: iOS users encrypt data more than Android users

Study: iOS users encrypt data more than Android users

Data security is important to us all, but who’s more concerned with it? From a mobile standpoint, cloud storage offers an easy way to back files up, and each major mobile OS has a remote device lock feature. Cross-platform cloud storage solution iDrive has examined the backups on their platform from both iOS and Android, and compared the measures we take to safeguard our stuff. In addition to highlighting the content we save most often, iDrive also found that when it comes to security, iOS users are much more likely to use encryption.

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Blackphone PrivatOS gets “Spaces” sandbox, own app store

Blackphone PrivatOS gets “Spaces” sandbox, own app store

They say that a chain is only as strong as the weakest link and sometimes in the case of operating systems, that weakest link is in the apps ecosystem. That is why Blackphone will be updating its Android-based security and privacy hardened PrivatOS with two new features that tries to mitigate the adverse effects of third-party applications. With Spaces, PrivatOS can keep personal files and apps personal, away from sensitive enterprise content. And its own app store ensures that only equally secure apps actually get installed.

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FIDO releases v1.0; password days are numbered

FIDO releases v1.0; password days are numbered

There are plenty of ways to log-in at a computer, but how many of them are secure? Standard sign-in procedures, like using a social account or two-factor authentication might be easy or more secure than your (probably terrible) password, but don’t offer the security features of biometrics. FIDO, a standard for using a USB or other plug-in as a security key for your computer or device, has just released version 1.0 of their software. This builds on the work of Google, who have previously worked with FIDO, but takes it a step further.

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Senator Al Franken quizzes Lyft on its privacy policy

Senator Al Franken quizzes Lyft on its privacy policy

Uber's business troubles over the past few weeks have spawned an increased scrutiny toward ridesharing services in general. The company recently posted its privacy policy, which spurred Senator Al Franken to fire a letter off to Uber expressing concerns and questioning aspects of it. During all this, Lyft quietly updated its own privacy policy, something the WSJ reported on late last month. With that change, Lyft implemented "new technical restrictions", and now Senator Franken has some questions about that, too.

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Uber job applicant said he had access to user data for hours

Uber job applicant said he had access to user data for hours

Uber has been called into question over privacy concerns after news about its "God View" tool, which grants employees access to user data, came to light. That tool has reportedly been used improperly in the past, including having been used to track a journalist without her permission, according to BuzzFeed. Though the company published its privacy policy on its blog last month, that has done little to settle concerns about how safe its customer data is, and now an anonymous source has surfaced at The Washington Post claiming he was granted access to it -- and he wasn't even an employee.

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Google+ is ‘Facebook-lite’ says former Googler

Google+ is ‘Facebook-lite’ says former Googler

“Adrift at sea”. “Facebook-lite”. According to former Googler Chris Medina, that’s exactly what Google+ is. Rather than serving as the “social backbone” it was designed to be, Media thinks Google+ is about as far from that missive as possible. In a recent post on blogging site Medium, Medina took aim at his former company’s “social” platform, calling them out for violating privacy and trust along the way. If you’re wondering what gives Medina pause to take on Plus, it’s easy: he used to work on it.

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Bing, Yahoo begin accepting European ‘right to be forgotten’ requests

Bing, Yahoo begin accepting European ‘right to be forgotten’ requests

Good news for individuals in Europe looking to have unwanted information about them purged from internet search results, as Microsoft's Bing and Yahoo's search have officially started accepting and processing "right to be forgotten" requests. This follows a ruling in May by the European Union's Court of Justice that gives people the right to make such requests, and requires search engines to comply under certain circumstances.

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