President Obama

Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

President Obama publicly signed the executive order driving through new cyber security legislation today, using an appearance at Stanford to discuss the controversial balance of privacy and protection. The bill - already a topic of fierce debate in Congress, which had continually refused to pass it - demands greater information sharing between government and private industry, "sharing appropriate information" as relevant to ensure vital infrastructure isn't compromised by hackers or malicious governments. However, exactly what counts as "appropriate", and what impact that has on individual privacy, remains to be seen.

Continue Reading

Obama knew iPhone would be a hit from day one

Obama knew iPhone would be a hit from day one

President Obama gets a lot right. He gets a lot wrong, too. One thing he absolutely nailed dead-on was the success Apple’s iPhone would have. In an upcoming book named Believer: My Forty Years in Politics penned by President Obama’s political strategist, David Axelrod, The president had glowing things to say after a private meeting with Steve Jobs, who showed him the first iPhone well ahead of its launch. A noted BlackBerry fan, Barry seemed to understand the iPhone was going to be a huge deal form the jump.

Continue Reading

Drone landing at White House may spell doom for consumers

Drone landing at White House may spell doom for consumers

Late last night, a Drone landed on the grounds of The White House. It led to a lockdown of the premises, with a White House spokesperson telling The New York Times that Secret Service agents were looking into it. The President was in no danger (he’s in India), but consumer use of drones is. This incident at the White House is, like many involving drones, likely very innocent. Still, it will probably spark heavy political blowback as the FAA prepares to rule on what we can and can’t do with drones.

Continue Reading

Obama backs Cameron’s fight against encryption

Obama backs Cameron’s fight against encryption

Flip-flopping somewhat on his earlier stance against putting backdoors in software, US President Barack Obama took UK Prime Minister David Cameron's side in telling tech companies to give government agencies access to encrypted devices and communication. Of course, all in the aid of the fight against terrorism and in the interests of national security. The calls from the world's top government leaders came after two recent incidents that are directly related or being linked to encryption: the hacking of Sony computers last year and the shooting at newspaper Charlie Hebdo this month.

Continue Reading

US and UK plan bank hack wargames as security fears grow

US and UK plan bank hack wargames as security fears grow

A war game exercise which will see US and UK banks simulate a huge and potentially devastating hack on their systems will be run later in the year, as the two countries ramp up their preparedness for cyber espionage. The practice will be run by representatives from the NSA and the FBI in the US, and MI5 and GCHQ in the UK, with a so-called "cyber cell" of experts collaborating on worst-case scenarios and the ways in which vital institutions can steel themselves. The news follows the high-profile hack of Sony Pictures late last year, and comes as security commentators warn that more online attacks are a case of "when" not "if".

Continue Reading

President Obama calls for new federal laws on data security

President Obama calls for new federal laws on data security

President Obama thinks you should be protected if you’re connected. On Monday, the President called for the passing of the Personal Data Notification and Protection Act, which would require you to be notified within 30 days if a company you did business with as a consumer or professionally were breached. Secondly, the President wants access to your credit score to be simpler so you can manage your credit data should a hacker wreak havoc on your financial standing, giving you an early start on fixing the problems.

Continue Reading

White House sanctions North Korea in response to Sony hack

White House sanctions North Korea in response to Sony hack

In an apparent attempt to thwart future cyber attacks, the United states has issued sanctions against North Korea. The sanctions are a response to “ongoing provocative, destabilizing, and repressive actions and policies, particularly its destructive and coercive cyber attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment”. Sanctions are part of The White House’s previous statement that any response to North Korea regarding the Sony hack would be “proportional”, though the sanctions aren’t final. The White house is calling them the “first part” of a full response.

Continue Reading

North Korea’s internet is down in wake of The Interview

North Korea’s internet is down in wake of The Interview

Late Sunday, the 22nd of December, North Korea began suffering a major internet outage cross-country. This sort of internet failure is not common in North Korea, and researchers have suggested that it's very possible the country is under a concentrated DDoS attack. This would be a denial-of-service for North Korea shortly after the FBI suggested whoever was responsible for the digital attack on Sony would suffer costs and consequences. Meanwhile President Barack Obama suggested that "we will respond proportionally, and we will respond in a place and time and a manner that we choose."

Continue Reading

Obama: Sony pulling The Interview was “a mistake”

Obama: Sony pulling The Interview was “a mistake”

President Obama has criticized Sony for pulling The Interview following the hack blamed on North Korea, saying that while he is "sympathetic" to its losses, he nonetheless believes "they made a mistake." Describing cyber-security as an "urgent issue," Obama drew parallels between the Sony Pictures Entertainment hack and other, perhaps more traditional types of terrorism, including the Boston Marathon bombing. However, while Obama confirmed that some sort of response by the US was in order, he declined to give any specific details as to what that might be.

Continue Reading

Cuba about to go online as Diplomacy wins out

Cuba about to go online as Diplomacy wins out

Before you get too tucked into this article, or any news regarding the United States’ new diplomatic views on Cuba, just know this: as it stands, a Cuban resident can’t read any of it. Say what you like about the content or context of any article on any site you read, but the people of Cuba by and large aren’t going to read it. They can’t. That’s likely to change over time, as the free-flow of information is coming their way.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9