Portable Media

Microsoft Argo / Zune MP3 Video player

Microsoft Argo / Zune MP3 Video player

While the information provide by Engadget and Gizmodo are still rumors and unconfirmed, it's very likely and credible that the image below is indeed the Microsoft Zune (it's possible that the device also went by the code name Argo.

According to Engadget’s report, the Zuno display is 4:3 ratio not 16:9.  The screen size might be in the range of 3 to 3.5-inches wide.  There's also a big wheel with two buttons on either side; the left seems to be a "back" and the right is a "play/pause" button.

New Details on the Microsoft “mPod”

New Details on the Microsoft “mPod”

Thanks to the Seattle Times, we have even more information on what could turn out to be Microsoft's iPod-killer (which we've dubbed the mPod for now). Codenamed Argo, the device is apparently being designed as part of a "complete line" of Xbox-related gear. By "complete line," we're assuming that means that there will be more to this lineup than just the Argo and the Xbox 360 (hint hint). Argo's team is being led by J Allard, the man who co-developed the Xbox, and includes members from the MSN Music team and Allard's XNA Framework team.

Venzero Unveils LilOne PMP

Venzero Unveils LilOne PMP

Portable media players are everywhere today, since these devices are one of the new must-have gadgets around. While some might consider the Venzero LilOne to be a bit of a wimp in the world of PMPs, the device is not without its place in the world. Sporting a 6 GB micro hard drive, the LilOne isn't shy of features, allowing users to play both video and audio (and pictures too, but who uses those anymore?) in its tiny 1.5-inch, 262,000-color screen.

An iPod That Talks?

An iPod That Talks?

In keeping with our ever-expanding coverage on the future of Apple's little music player, speculation has arisen (in the form of yet-another patent filing) that the next-generation Apple music machines will speak to you, announcing the song's title and artist in a variety of celebrity voices. While it's sort of creepy to consider having your iPod talk to you (is it really so difficult to just look at the song title, people?), this might be a great step forward in allowing iPods to be used by vision-impaired customers who can't read the text on the iPod's admittedly tiny screen.

Low cost Linux portable digital audio workstation by Trinity

Low cost Linux portable digital audio workstation by Trinity

Trinity Audio Group is attracting budget conscience music producers and podcasters around the world. It is based on the Compulab's CM-X270L, the Trinity, along with a variety of open source audio applications, such as on Linux, inclusive of Audacity and Escasound, helps them in developing their own graphical frron-end.  The specs seems to be usual, that includes a 6.5 inch TFT running at 640x480, 128MB RAM, 20GB hard drive, built-in WiFi, two Neutrik combo jacks, and a purported four hours of battery life. It will be ready to be shipped in October for $1000.

[Via Linux Devices]

Update on the Microsoft iPod-Killer

Update on the Microsoft iPod-Killer

Thanks to our friends over at Gizmodo, we have some new details on the rumored Microsoft iPod-killer. First, the Wi-Fi capabilities of the device won't be limted to just downloading new songs on the go; the "mPod" will allso allow you share songs with other listeners, allowing you to sample the music immediately and then buy it when you get home. Also, the Wi-Fi connectivity will be used to send ads to your device automatically, adding a 10% off coupon as a bonus for watching that ad. The other bit of news is that, should you have a sizable iTunes collection built up already, Microsoft's service will scan this collection and give you the music for use with your "mPod" for free, giving users a huge incentive to jump ship as they wouldn't need to pay for music twice.

Say Hello to the mPod?

Say Hello to the mPod?

Microsoft, everyone's favorite computer empire, is apparently working on an iPod-style music and video player, hoping to have the final product ready to roll come this Christmas. What more, the Microsoft music player will come with an iTunes-style music program/store and will feature Wi-Fi capabilities, which is planned to allow users to download music and videos without being connected to a computer - this feature alone could spell trouble for Apple should a competing capability not find its way into the iPod. In typical Microsoft fashion, expect the launch of these devices to be part of a multi-million dollar campaign; also in typical Microsoft fashion, I would be surprised to see virii for the devices before they debut. Stay tuned.

[via AppleInsider]

iLuv Introduces the i180 iPod Video Recorder

iLuv Introduces the i180 iPod Video Recorder

So, you just spent $300 on your new 30 GB iPod, but you want to be able to do more than just listen to your tunes? Well, there's always the iTunes Music Store's TV library, but in case you're happy with the video library you've already paid for, iLuv has the answer. Say hello to the i180 iPod Video Recorder, an iPod dock that also allows you to turn your fifth-generation iPod into a DVR (the device doesn't work with any other iPod but the 5G).

Digital Cube Shows Off BMP-1430

Digital Cube Shows Off BMP-1430

Portable media players are all the rage these days, for no matter where people go, nothing can fill spare time like a couple of random Family Guy episodes. With this information in mind, Digital Cube, a PMP manufacturer out of Korea, has taken the wrappings off the BMP-1430, which will be sold through Bluedot. A nifty little device, the BMP-1430 features a 4.3-inch screen @ 480x272, a 30 GB hard drive, and a 3.1"x5.2"x1" frame. The BMP-1430 supports MPEG-1, 2, and 4 as well as XviD, WMV7, 8, and 9, MP3, WMA, and OGG, meaning that you'll be hard-pressed to find media that this thing can't handle.

Aigo Unveils the MP-P335

Aigo Unveils the MP-P335

In yet another PMP entry, Aigo has taken the wraps off the MP-P335. As you can see from the image, the MP-P335 is nicely-sized for one's hand, and features a 30 GB hard drive, a 480 x 272 TFT LCD display, MP3, WMA, WAV, MPEG-1, 2, 4, AVI, DivX, XviD, JPEG and text support (quite the impressive array of media formats), 5 hours of playback time per charge, and line in video recording. The Linux-based device is expected to retail for around 400 Euros (about $500 USD), though Stateside launch details weren't available yet. Looks like this might be worth keeping your eye on, so stay tuned to Slashgear for any/all updates on this new device.

Exclusive Preview of Aigo MP-P335 [via Gizmodo]

-B.N.