piracy

SOPA and PIPA delayed indefinitely, Internet Wins

SOPA and PIPA delayed indefinitely, Internet Wins

In what can only be described as seeming to be a Flawless Victory, not a few hours after Senator Harry Reid announced he'd be delaying the vote on PIPA, representative Lamar Smith, better known now as the sponsor of SOPA, has announced he would delay consideration on that bill as well. Both teams have been pressured by waves of not only internet-based groups during the blackout of major websites earlier this week, but by voters calling in from around the nation this week as a result of it. Both groups have noted their intent to "revisit" how to defeat "foreign thieves" in regards to piracy, but would be stopping votes on their legislature for now.

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Protect IP Act vote postponed as Senate ponders revision

Protect IP Act vote postponed as Senate ponders revision

The US Senate vote on the Protect IP Act (PIPA) set to go ahead on January 24 2012 has been postponed, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has confirmed. "In light of recent events, I have decided to postpone Tuesday's vote on the PROTECT IP Act" Senator Reid tweeted, while TPM posted a full memo distributed by his office that details the decision. While PIPA - along with the Stop Online Piracy Act - was the cause of widespread online protest earlier this week, this postponement doesn't, however, mean the act is dead.

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Anonymous speaks on #OpMegaUpload as CEO Dotcom faces extradition

Anonymous speaks on #OpMegaUpload as CEO Dotcom faces extradition

The FBI's surprise takedown of Megaupload continues to send shockwaves, with increasingly vocal complaints from legitimate users of the online locker service that their files and backups are being held hostage. The unexpected downtime has left many surprised and angry that Megaupload - which the US Department of Justice described as "an international organized criminal enterprise" - has been taken offline with no consideration of non-copyrighted content, a reason some Anonymous members claim was their motivation for involvement in the huge denial-of-service attack yesterday. Meanwhile, reports from New Zealand where company founder Kim Dotcom was arrested suggest the outspoken exec locked himself in a panic room so as to avoid arrest, and was discovered near a sawn-off shotgun.

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Megaupload: Seven charged, Anti-piracy stance a sham say Feds

Megaupload: Seven charged, Anti-piracy stance a sham say Feds

Seven have been charged in the Megaupload copyright shutdown case, including site founder Kim "Dr. Evil" Dotcom, as more details on the $500m suit emerge. At least four of the seven have been arrested so far, the NYTimes reports, though the company's legal team has said in a statement that "Megaupload believes the government is wrong on the facts, wrong on the law." The dramatic shutdown of Megaupload and the seizure of around $50m in assets led to swift response by the hacking community, with collective Anonymous taking down the Department of Justice's site, along with the RIAA, MPAA and Universal Music.

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Anonymous take down Department of Justice, RIAA, MPAA, Universal Music

Anonymous take down Department of Justice, RIAA, MPAA, Universal Music

Earlier today the sites Megaupload and Megavideo were shut down by ICE, a federal group responsible for working with and shutting down groups that pirate media illegally - in retaliation the hacker collective known as Anonymous have shut down the RIAA, the MPAA, Universal Music, and the United States Government site Justice.org, belonging to the Department of Justice. These hits have been confirmed by several anonymously run "official" Anonymous sources such as twitter accounts @Anonops, @AnonymousIRC, and @YourAnonNews, and were likely planned in advance. As a bit of an extra jab after the biggest sites in this situation were downed, Anonymous noted that they should simply say, "for #SOPA supporters their#SOPAblackout is today."

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Megaupload is down, Piracy indictment to blame

Megaupload is down, Piracy indictment to blame

One of the most notoriously popular media uploading and downloading sites in the world has been shut down today amid allegations of piracy and charges amounting to $500 million in lost revenue for pirated content. These charges come from federal prosecutors in Virginia and are being leveled against the founder and others involved with the site. If found guilty, needless to say, Megaupload's owners will stand no chance of revival any time soon.

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Lawmakers sway post-SOPA/PIPA protest but Acts still have venom

Lawmakers sway post-SOPA/PIPA protest but Acts still have venom

Wikipedia is back, Google has taken off its blindfold and US Representatives have danced, shuffled and snuck across the aisles as the whip counts waver, leaving the future of SOPA and PIPA uncertain. After online protests against the Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect IP Act saw multiple sites post call-to-arms messages or black-out altogether, at least seven senators have jumped ship from supporting the proposed legislation. Yet Wikipedia - and others - highlight the fight isn't over; "we're not done yet" the online encyclopedia ominously warned today.

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SOPA and PIPA are the Wrong Way to Tackle Piracy

SOPA and PIPA are the Wrong Way to Tackle Piracy

Anti-SOPA and anti-PIPA protests have begun in force today, with sites like Wikipedia giving the internet a taste of a web without freedom of speech, as censorship and piracy take center stage for lawmakers, content-owners and users alike. The proposed acts are, we believe, a heavy-handed and naive approach toward the legitimate issue of content theft. Being against the proposed acts isn't the same as being "pro-piracy"; that's why we here at SlashGear (and R3 Media, the company behind SlashGear), as avid content-creators and content-consumers, believe SOPA and PIPA are the wrong way to tackle piracy online.

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Wikipedia anti-SOPA blackout underway

Wikipedia anti-SOPA blackout underway

Wikipedia has entered a twenty-four hour blackout in protest of SOPA and PIPA, the US anti-piracy acts currently giving free-internet advocates headaches. Visit any English-language Wikipedia page and instead of a crowd-sourced entry you'll be prompted to "Imagine a world without free knowledge" as well as offered links to spread the message. Meanwhile, Google has opened up some of its historically whitespace homepage for an anti-SOPA call to arms, while other sites prepare to go dark.

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SlashGear 101: SOPA and PIPA explained in plain English

SlashGear 101: SOPA and PIPA explained in plain English

If you've not heard of either SOPA or PIPA in the last few weeks and months in your journeys through the internet, now's the time to get educated, and quick. While the most recent news has been that the White House reaction to the SOPA bill specifically has effectively curbed it, there's no reason why it can't pop up again with a different name or a couple of simple changes that allow it to pass silently. These two bills, SOPA and PIPA, are amongst the most dangerous pieces of legislature ever to be written up for passage by the United States government in regards to innovation and the free market on a global scale today: this post will tell you why.

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