patent suit

Supreme Court declines to Google’s appeal in Oracle copyright suit

Supreme Court declines to Google’s appeal in Oracle copyright suit

The United States Supreme court rejected an appeal from Google after it lost a copyright infringement case against Oracle. The case originally dates back to 2010. It was then that Oracle Corp., the software company behind Java, alleged that Google's Android OS infringed on copyrighted Java APIs (application programming interfaces). In 2012, a district court found the case in favor of Google, but, in May of last year, the judge's ruling was overturned when an appeals court ruled in favor of Oracle. As the U.S. Supreme Court has backed off, this could be the ruling that stands, holding that API's can be copyrighted.

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Microsoft phones infringe on patents, may face import ban

Microsoft phones infringe on patents, may face import ban

Microsoft may have acquired more than Nokia's mobile business. It has also inherited the Finnish company's legal headaches and now it will be facing the music. A judge for the US International Trade Commission has deemed that Microsoft's smartphones indeed infringe on two patents held by patent licensing outfit InterDigital. This lawsuit was first filed against Nokia almost four years ago and it is Microsoft who will now be paying the price. Worst case scenario, the ITC could ban imports of infringing Windows Phones into the US.

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Google wants to buy your patents before trolls get them

Google wants to buy your patents before trolls get them

No stranger to patent trolls, Google has introduced a program they’re calling the ‘Patent Purchase Promotion’. Equal parts patent purchasing clearinghouse and troll roadblock, Google’s scheme will allow those interested in selling patents an avenue for submitting the patent, setting a price, and allowing Google to review the offer. After a review period, Google will either make an offer or refuse the purchase. Google is calling the new program ‘experimental’, and its first wave will open up next month for a two week period.

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Patent fight, round one: NVIDIA: 1, Samsung, Qualcomm: 0

Patent fight, round one: NVIDIA: 1, Samsung, Qualcomm: 0

Samsung and Qualcomm might have had a falling out over the chips that would have been used for the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 edge, but the two might have to become frenemies soon if they are to see victory in the patent challenge NVIDIA has brought to their doorsteps. Claiming the first kill, NVIDIA proudly announced on its blog that presiding Administrative Law Judge Thomas Pender has ruled in favor of NVIDIA's construction of the patent claims, which very well sets the tone for the upcoming trial, or even call for a settlement.

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Apple sued again by firm that just snatched $529 million from them

Apple sued again by firm that just snatched $529 million from them

Just days ago, Apple found itself on the losing end of a lawsuit. The $529 million judgement came to the chagrin of many, but not because Apple had done anything overtly wrong.The ruling was in favor of Smartflash LLC, often described as a patent troll. The lawsuit was in regard to that slippery slope of intellectual property, where Smartflash claims Apple trampled on several patents they hold. With a half-billion dollar ruling under their belt, Smartflash is at it again — with Apple, again.

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Apple loses $532.9 million patent lawsuit

Apple loses $532.9 million patent lawsuit

In the latest case, Smartflash LLC v. Apple Inc., Apple was ordered by a federal jury to pay $532.9 million in damages to Smartflash LLC in a Texas courtroom. Smartflash is a small company that successfully took down Apple over intellectual property rights. Smartflash claims Apple infringed on three of their patents. They originally sought $852 million in damages while Apple contested that damages should be limited to $4.5 million. Smartflash has also sued Samsung and Google using the same patents pertaining to digital rights management, data storage, and managed access payment systems.

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RPX buys all Rockstar patents; promises licensing, not lawsuits

RPX buys all Rockstar patents; promises licensing, not lawsuits

Rockstar, the patent trolling firm formed by Apple, Sony, Microsoft and others, is dissolving as we know it. The company, which was formed after the member companies joined forces to purchase over 6,000 patents being sold by Nortel Networks during their bankruptcy, has sold 4,000 of those patents to patent firm RPX for a reported $900 million. The remaining 2,000 patents were distributed to the companies involved with Rockstar, and are not subject to this sale. Rockstar is also ending all current litigation to quickly close the deal.

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Google settles patent squabble with Rockstar Consoritum

Google settles patent squabble with Rockstar Consoritum

It seems that either Google or Rockstar (the industry consortium, not the game developers) has decided to throw in the towel. Details are still unclear on who called it quits first, but the fact of the matter is that, at least in the patent case filed in Texas, Google and Rockstar have reached an agreement to settle "all matters of controversy". It is highly likely that a large amount of money will also be involved. But what's even less clear is how it will affect Android, who is at the heart of the litigation.

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NVIDIA responds to Samsung’s “false advertising” claim

NVIDIA responds to Samsung’s “false advertising” claim

It is a well known legal tactic, especially between companies, for one to fight back a lawsuit with a countersuit. So when NVIDIA sued Samsung and Qualcomm last September, in what it claims to be the first patent suit it has ever filed, it fully expected Samsung to hit back with a suit of its own, which it did this week. But what it didn't expect was for Samsung, in the same lawsuit, to accuse NVIDIA of falsely advertising its Tekgra K1 as "the world's fastest mobile processor".

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