opinion

Windows 8: what Microsoft did right and what went wrong

Windows 8: what Microsoft did right and what went wrong

Windows 10 is coming really soon. If AMD is to be believed, that is happening around July. Given this upcoming version of Windows is set to fix a number of complaints about Windows 8, it's release will surely call to mind some its predecessor's shortcomings. But for all the warts that Windows 8 had, it wasn't completely a failure in all aspects and even laid the foundations of many features and mindsets still present in Windows 10 and elsewhere. Here we take a look at 5 of the things Windows 8 could have gotten right and also how they failed to reach the mark.

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Apple Watch success isn’t sales, it’s stickiness

Apple Watch success isn’t sales, it’s stickiness

Apple isn't saying how many Apple Watches it sold in the first weekend of preorders, but arguably the bigger question is how many will still be wrapped around wrists a few months after. Unofficial estimates of sales have suggested as many as a million of the iOS wearables have been earmarked for eager owners, pushing shipping estimates into the summer at the earliest, and for many it was a case of buy first, try second since preorders opened before store demo displays did.

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Take a knee; we need to talk about you (not) spending money on apps

Take a knee; we need to talk about you (not) spending money on apps

Look at your smartphone’s app selection — how many of those apps did you pay for? How many of those apps did you spend any money on via in-app purchases? According to a new study, not many. Mobile marketing firm Swrve found about 60% of mobile game revenue comes from less than 1% of players. Actually, it’s less than 0.5%. To be even more accurate, it’s even less than 0.25%. While that’s just games, it’s indicative of the app industry. This actually is your fault, and it needs to stop.

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No, the new MacBook (and its single USB-C) isn’t for everyone

No, the new MacBook (and its single USB-C) isn’t for everyone

More controversial than the keyboard, more divisive than the battery life: the thing that's causing the greatest number of arguments about the new Retina MacBook is its paucity of ports. A single USB-C on the left side of the notebook isn't, as Vincent observed in our own review of the 2015 MacBook, a deal breaker, but not everyone is quite so ready to be convinced. It's a legitimate concern, even if in the grand history of tech it's not a new one.

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Why I refuse to believe VR is the future of gaming

Why I refuse to believe VR is the future of gaming

Virtual reality was all the talk at the Game Developers Conference this week. From Sony to Valve to Oculus to Sulon, a slew of companies showed off virtual reality technology that they say, will carry us well into the future.

Of course, this is something we’ve heard before from hardware makers. Oculus has shown its Rift product off for years, arguing that it can succeed in virtual reality where so many other companies have failed. Now several other companies are arguing the same.

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Elon Musk is Easily the Most Fascinating Person in Tech

Elon Musk is Easily the Most Fascinating Person in Tech

I’m often asked who I think could be the biggest game-changer in the world of technology in the next decade. Often, people share their opinions on the matter, saying that it’ll be Apple or Google or even Microsoft. They argue that companies – not individuals – will ultimately be the change agents going forward. While I can certainly agree that major companies will likely play a major role in industry growth, I see things a much different way. I still believe that individuals can change the world in dramatic fashion, and the person who has the highest likelihood of doing that right now is Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk.

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Apple Watch may have already beaten Android Wear

Apple Watch may have already beaten Android Wear

Canalys says about 720,000 Android Wear devices have been shipped. Of those watches, the Moto 360 is ‘the clear leader’ in the clubhouse, with the G Watch R from LG also making an impact versus its squared sister device. Their findings are interesting, but the caveat is ‘shipped’ versus ‘sold’. We know the two don’t directly correlate (we saw that with Samsung tablets). Now I'm starting to wonder if the Apple Watch has already beaten Android Wear, without ever having seen the inside of an Apple Store.

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Is iPad innovation dead?

Is iPad innovation dead?

Earlier today, something caught my attention. In a report on why the iPad might see a sales dip in 2015, an analyst cleverly shouldered Developers with blame for the iPad’s decline. Specifically, he claimed there weren’t enough good apps to compel potential customers to want an iPad. Is that true? Is the iPad in decline because Developers don’t create solid iPad experiences? Apple has created new foundations for iOS development, but are things like Metal and Swift proactive, or reactive? The answer: it’s complicated.

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It’s time to hit reset – not delete – on Google Glass

It’s time to hit reset – not delete – on Google Glass

Farewell, Explorers. Goodbye, Glass. Google's decision to spin out its controversial wearable into a standalone business was instantly portrayed by many as the often-predicted death of the headset, but the reality is less clear-cut. Glass' struggles saw early enthusiasm sour when questions around privacy and usefulness collided head-on with anti-ostentatious-geek sentiment, and the "face computer" never managed to restore its reputation. While the temptation may be to hit delete on the whole saga, I'd argue a Glass reboot with far greater focus on how head-worn wearables might fit into our daily lives would be a far more rewarding strategy.

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Project Ara has a lot to prove

Project Ara has a lot to prove

The geek within me loves Project Ara. Interchangeable modules that snick into a brushed aluminum frame and turn your smartphone into a pseudo-DSLR or a Tricorder: what's not to like? Google's ATAP team demonstrated the latest prototype - and detailed its flaws and future improvements - at Ara's second developer event yesterday, inviting module-minded partners on stage to discuss exactly what the flexible phone could become with a little imagination. Ambitious, certainly, but while many (myself included) left the event impressed by Regina Dugan and her intriguing handset, that enthusiasm was tempered with concern over whether the real-world would be so welcoming.

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