nsa

NSA catalog lets agents deliver cloned hardware to targets

NSA catalog lets agents deliver cloned hardware to targets

A new examination of the seemingly bottomless well of Snowden documents describes an internal NSA catalog of dead ringers for consumer hardware that the NSA can deploy on unsuspecting targets' systems. For example, when a target orders a new hard drive, router, monitor cable, or USB plug online, the NSA can intercept the order and send a bugged clone, which the target would then install by his own volition. The catalog includes hardware by Seagate, Samsung, Cisco, Huawei, Dell and many others.

Continue Reading

NSA phone surveillance ruled legal by NY judge [UPDATE]

NSA phone surveillance ruled legal by NY judge [UPDATE]

In a ruling on federal phone-tracking this week a U.S. District Judge based in New York has ruled that the NSA’s actions thus far have been legal. Judge William Pauley sent a ruling on Friday, the 27th of December, saying the NSA program “represents the government’s counter-punch” in efforts to eliminate al-Qaida network efforts. This ruling dismisses a lawsuit brought on by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Continue Reading

McAfee and Bletchley Park under fire over cyber security Snowden snub

McAfee and Bletchley Park under fire over cyber security Snowden snub

Attempts to edit Edward Snowden out of cyber security history have prompted fierce debate about the role played by the NSA whistleblower, after famed spy museum Bletchley Park opted not to include the 2013 revelations and his role in them in a new exhibit. Bletchley Park, today a museum but formerly the clandestine UK site where Alan Turing and others cracked the Nazi's Enigma code and arguably turned the fate of the Second World War, has courted controversy by electing to omit Snowden's part in digital security in a new gallery, out of concerns that doing so might be interpreted as condoning his leaks.

Continue Reading

RSA denies NSA collusion over backdoor code access

RSA denies NSA collusion over backdoor code access

Security firm RSA has categorically denied colluding with the US National Security Agency (NSA) after allegations that the company accepted $10m of government cash in order to make compromised code its default. Reports late last week suggested RSA had been paid by the NSA to adopt a random number generator that the agency had purposefully left backdoor access to, something the company strenuously denies.

Continue Reading

NSA and GCHQ targeted 1,000 allied individuals: latest Snowden drop

NSA and GCHQ targeted 1,000 allied individuals: latest Snowden drop

The latest installment of the ongoing slow release of the whistleblower Edward Snowden's cache of 1.7 million stolen NSA documents has revealed over 1,000 targets of the NSA's and GCHQ's international spying efforts between 2008 and 2011. The targets include high-ranking officials in allied nations, economic regulatory bodies, humanitarian aid agencies, and -- seemingly as an afterthought -- individuals being watched for hypothesized ties to terrorism. These particular documents were reported Friday by the American newspaper New York Times, Britain's the Guardian and Germany's Der Spiegel.

Continue Reading

NSA paid RSA millions for backdoor access allege insiders

NSA paid RSA millions for backdoor access allege insiders

The US National Security Agency (NSA) allegedly paid security firm RSA $10m to open a secret back door into encryption products, new reports from documents obtained from whistleblower Edward Snowden suggest. Earlier leaks had revealed that the NSA created a flawed random number generation system, Dual Elliptic Curve, which RSA used in its Bsafe security tool; now, Reuters reports, the government agency paid RSA to ensure that its formula was set as the default system in Bsafe, making it more likely that the NSA would be able to quietly access systems and documents users thought secured.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15