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McAfee and Bletchley Park under fire over cyber security Snowden snub

McAfee and Bletchley Park under fire over cyber security Snowden snub

Attempts to edit Edward Snowden out of cyber security history have prompted fierce debate about the role played by the NSA whistleblower, after famed spy museum Bletchley Park opted not to include the 2013 revelations and his role in them in a new exhibit. Bletchley Park, today a museum but formerly the clandestine UK site where Alan Turing and others cracked the Nazi's Enigma code and arguably turned the fate of the Second World War, has courted controversy by electing to omit Snowden's part in digital security in a new gallery, out of concerns that doing so might be interpreted as condoning his leaks.

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RSA denies NSA collusion over backdoor code access

RSA denies NSA collusion over backdoor code access

Security firm RSA has categorically denied colluding with the US National Security Agency (NSA) after allegations that the company accepted $10m of government cash in order to make compromised code its default. Reports late last week suggested RSA had been paid by the NSA to adopt a random number generator that the agency had purposefully left backdoor access to, something the company strenuously denies.

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NSA and GCHQ targeted 1,000 allied individuals: latest Snowden drop

NSA and GCHQ targeted 1,000 allied individuals: latest Snowden drop

The latest installment of the ongoing slow release of the whistleblower Edward Snowden's cache of 1.7 million stolen NSA documents has revealed over 1,000 targets of the NSA's and GCHQ's international spying efforts between 2008 and 2011. The targets include high-ranking officials in allied nations, economic regulatory bodies, humanitarian aid agencies, and -- seemingly as an afterthought -- individuals being watched for hypothesized ties to terrorism. These particular documents were reported Friday by the American newspaper New York Times, Britain's the Guardian and Germany's Der Spiegel.

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NSA paid RSA millions for backdoor access allege insiders

NSA paid RSA millions for backdoor access allege insiders

The US National Security Agency (NSA) allegedly paid security firm RSA $10m to open a secret back door into encryption products, new reports from documents obtained from whistleblower Edward Snowden suggest. Earlier leaks had revealed that the NSA created a flawed random number generation system, Dual Elliptic Curve, which RSA used in its Bsafe security tool; now, Reuters reports, the government agency paid RSA to ensure that its formula was set as the default system in Bsafe, making it more likely that the NSA would be able to quietly access systems and documents users thought secured.

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Obama hears panel: Stop NSA bulk phone data collection

Obama hears panel: Stop NSA bulk phone data collection

The White House has released a lengthy report written by a five-member panel recommending sweeping reforms of the NSA. Included among the 46 recommendations by the "Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies" is one to delete all bulk telephone metadata on Americans from the NSA's servers. The panel also suggested that the data should be allowed to be stored by the private telecoms for a capped length of time -- five years in most cases -- accessible by the NSA only through court order or other official third-party permission.

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Tech industry presents unified privacy front to White House

Tech industry presents unified privacy front to White House

A veritable pantheon of top-ranking emissaries from some of the largest and most powerful tech companies in the United States descended on the White House today to press the Obama administration to move aggressively on reforming the NSA's nearly universal surveillance of US citizens and the world. Their message was clear: Stop the spy agency from forcibly or stealthily seizing and storing bulk data about their customers. The message comes during an ongoing firestorm of public opposition to the agency's bulk data collection programs, ignited and continually stoked by the revelation of Edward Snowden's cache of an estimated 1.7 million stolen NSA documents detailing its ongoing quest for data omniscience.

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NSA phone data-tapping ruled unconstitutional by federal judge

NSA phone data-tapping ruled unconstitutional by federal judge

This week in Washington a district judge by the name of Richard Leon has ruled that the NSA's data collection program on phone call data collection is unconstitutional. This ruling came amid a court case which had two American citizens filing suit against the National Security Administration to stop any and all data collection programs. The case was originally filed the day after Edward Snowden's avalanche of NSA leaks began to be revealed for the first time.

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