Nike

Apple patent apps tip Nike+ for bikes, worry developers

Apple patent apps tip Nike+ for bikes, worry developers

Patents galore from Apple, and a dash of controversy to keep things suitably spicy.  First up is the uncontroversial stuff, a patent application that suggests Apple wants to do for cyclists what, with Nike+, they did for runners.  The so-called "Smart Bicycle System" uses sensors in the bike's chassis which wirelessly connect with the Apple device (either iPod or iPhone) to track everything from speed through gear status.

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The Daily Slash: June 21st 2010

The Daily Slash: June 21st 2010

Hope your weekend went well. We had a pretty busy day here, especially for a Monday, but we're thrilled that you could stick it out with us. It's time to wind down, so welcome to Monday's edition of The Daily Slash. Tonight, in the Best of R3 Media, we've got a great app for your Android device, Sony's talking smack about the 3DS, and Verizon Wireless completes a round of LTE testing. In the Dredge 'Net, Nike's got a giant LED screen, AT&T and Verizon kind of agree on something, and Kinect gets priced by Microsoft -- still not officially.

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iPhone Nike+ screenshots leak

iPhone Nike+ screenshots leak

Leaked screenshots of Nike's latest fitness collaboration with Apple have allegedly shown up online, giving the healthy and the wannabe-healthy a glimpse of what will be making them sweat almost as much as a Steve Jobs keynote.  Nike+ for the iPhone appears to bring many of the previously desktop-only features -such as mapping and performance graphing - directly to the handset itself.

Nike+ Sportsband – now all profits going to Nike, screws Apple

Nike+ Sportsband – now all profits going to Nike, screws Apple

With the Nike+ iPod product line you had to buy the Nike Trainers, the Nike+ iPod kit, and an iPod Nano, which was helping Apple make some dough. With this latest product Nike has cut out Apple completely making everything the previous Nike+ kit did possible, except for the music, without the iPod.

Instead the system uses a wrist band that communicates with the sensor that goes in your Nike Trainers and stores the data on its flash storage. The band then comes apart to reveal a USB interface which you can use to transfer up to 16 hours of workout data to your computer or upload and share it with the online community at Nikeplus.com.

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