NHTSA

Takata airbag recall doubles in size, Tesla added to affected list

Takata airbag recall doubles in size, Tesla added to affected list

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has doubled the Takata airbag recall in the U.S., announcing that between 35 million and 40 million additional inflators will be added. The announcement was made today, and marks a new record-breaking auto recall, bringing the total number of affected parts up to 69 million. As well, Tesla Motors has been added to the affected list, bringing the number of manufacturers up to 17.

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Google pressures government to fast-track its self-driving cars

Google pressures government to fast-track its self-driving cars

Google is pressuring the US government to green-light more advanced autonomous car testing, including ditching the requirement that prototype vehicles have controls for emergency use. Leader of Google's project, Chris Urmson, has penned a letter to U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx requesting more flexibility in how self-driving vehicles are judged, a move which would not only affect Google but any other company working on such technology.

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Car hacking the next big road threat warns FBI

Car hacking the next big road threat warns FBI

Drivers should be cautious of potential car hacks, the FBI has warned today, pointing out that increasingly connected vehicles open the door to futuristic automotive exploits. The PSA, issued by the Federal Bureau of Investigation along with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Department of Transportation (DoT), recognizes that onboard data connections - whether installed by automakers themselves, or via a third-party accessory by the cars' owners - can be useful, but cautions that we're unlikely to have heard the last of high-profile hacking incidents.

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20 automakers commit to auto-braking cars by 2022

20 automakers commit to auto-braking cars by 2022

Cars that can brake themselves in the case of an emergency will be standard on forecourts by 2022, with twenty automakers agreeing to fit the technology by default on their US models. The voluntary commitment to Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) could prevent an extra 28,000 crashes and 12,000 injuries, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said today.

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Ford F-150 drivers allege brake failure, NHTSA investigates

Ford F-150 drivers allege brake failure, NHTSA investigates

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced an investigation into complaints that some 2013 and 2014 model year Ford F-150 trucks can experience brake failure. According to the NHTSA, the issue could affect about 420,000 of the 3.5-liter V6 pickups; it has received 33 complaints about the possible issue so far, with some drivers reporting their trucks suffered “complete” braking failure, a few instances of which reportedly resulted in crashes.

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NHTSA Safety Probe Involves 856,000 Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep Shifters

NHTSA Safety Probe Involves 856,000 Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep Shifters

Auto designers are always looking for ways to maximize interior space, and that includes thinking outside the box when it comes to reinterpreting the control surfaces we've all become so accustomed to in modern vehicles. At Fiat Chrysler, in recent years this has meant transmuting the traditional transmission shifter stalk into a smaller selector that frees up significant room on the center console by avoiding a direct mechanical linkage with the transmission in favor of an electronic connection.

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Ford Focus door latch issue catches NHTSA attention

Ford Focus door latch issue catches NHTSA attention

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will investigate an issue affecting 2012 and 2013 Ford Focus vehicles that, at times, could prevent the doors from latching properly. The issue is said to affect about 400,000 of the vehicles, and according to some drivers, has at times manifested while the cars are in motion. The NHTSA revealed its plans in new documents released today; this is a similar probe to the one that ultimately lead to Ford and Lincoln recalls in 2015.

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Here’s what automakers think of Obama’s autonomous car plans

Here’s what automakers think of Obama’s autonomous car plans

The auto and electronics industries alike have reacted positively to the DoT's news of a near-$4bn push for autonomous vehicles. The decade-long proposal to turn America's roads into a welcoming arena for self-driving cars - and hopefully cut casualties, emissions, and expense along the way - still needs to be approved as part of President Obama's FY17 budget, but already big names in driverless research have praised the scheme.

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This is Obama’s $4bn, 10yr plan for America’s driverless cars

This is Obama’s $4bn, 10yr plan for America’s driverless cars

The US government aims to spend almost $4bn on autonomous driving in the next decade, pushing real-world trials that put computerized cars on roads. The investment was announced by US Transportation Department Secretary Anthony Foxx at a speech at the North American International Auto Show today, and came after US President Obama discussed wide-ranging support for self-driving vehicles in his State of the Union speech earlier this week.

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Rules requiring ‘quiet cars’ to have audio alerts delayed (again)

Rules requiring ‘quiet cars’ to have audio alerts delayed (again)

In January 2013, the U.S Department of Transportation (DOT) proposed a minimum sound requirement for electric and hybrid vehicles, a move to protect pedestrians who may fail to notice a silent car driving past. “This proposal,” the agency had said, “will help keep everyone using our nation’s street and roadways safe.” The plan to implement such sounds has been ongoing since despite auto maker objections, but it recently hit a snag that has stalled the finalization until early next year.

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Record $200m fine for Takata over airbags

Record $200m fine for Takata over airbags

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced its largest ever civil penalty, which has been lobbed against Takata, maker of the faulty airbags that have resulted in millions of recalls and several deaths. The penalty is for alleged Motor Vehicle Safety Act violations. In addition, and in line with what we’ve previously heard, the NHTSA has decided to take the unprecedented step of using its own authority to accelerate the recall repair rate.

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Takata airbag recall: regulators in talks about taking over

Takata airbag recall: regulators in talks about taking over

In what would end up being an unprecedented move in the U.S., government regulators are in talks about intervening in the Takata airbag scandal, doing so to ensure that all repairs are made efficiently and quickly. Reasons cited revolve around the sheer size of the recall, with a dozen major auto makers being involved and millions of cars. According to a recent report, the NHTSA is leaning in favor of taking over.

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