news

Researchers map individual words to specific brain regions

Researchers map individual words to specific brain regions

Researchers with the University of California, Berkeley, have detailed how the so-called “semantic system” in the human brain works, and their work could one day help form treatments for injuries and diseases that affect one’s ability to speak. The study’s lead author Alex Huth was one of several volunteers who listened to more than two hours’ worth of radio shows while positioned inside an fMRI machine, shedding light on how the brain reacts to words and, eventually helping create a map of sorts.

Continue Reading

Peacocks’ special feather structure creates trippy, hypnotizing ‘dance’

Peacocks’ special feather structure creates trippy, hypnotizing ‘dance’

Peacocks, perhaps nature's most trippy bird, shake their tail feathers when it's time to attract a new mate. Why? Shaking those feathers -- called "train-rattling" -- causes an illusion where the eye-like circles on the feathers become more prominent, seemingly floating outward and hanging in the air. Those circles exist to lure in peahens, but have fascinated more than a few humans, too. Now a new study has taken a closer look at this 'train-rattling' dance and uncovered a few equally fascinating secrets about how it works.

Continue Reading

Apple breaks its revenue streak with Q2 2016 YoY decline

Apple breaks its revenue streak with Q2 2016 YoY decline

It's tough times in tech, and there's no better example of that than Apple recording its first year-over-year decline in quarterly revenue since 2003. The Cupertino behemoth revealed Q2 2016 financial figures today and they don't make for the usual glowing reading, with CEO Tim Cook blaming "strong macroeconomic headwinds" for the market-disappointing numbers.

Continue Reading

Apple’s ‘Find My…’ tool leads Thai police to gang hideout

Apple’s ‘Find My…’ tool leads Thai police to gang hideout

Apple’s “Find My iPhone, iPad, and Mac” tool enables anyone with an iCloud account to figure out where they left their device, or where a thief has taken it. Assuming the proper features are enabled, the account will provide a map showing where exactly the gadget is located, aiding in recovering the device. The feature was recently used to track down a stolen iPad mini in Thailand, and it happened to take Thai police to a gang hideout, leading to a few arrests.

Continue Reading

Brazil targets zika virus with smelly, mosquito-killing billboards

Brazil targets zika virus with smelly, mosquito-killing billboards

Brazil, epicenter of the growing zika virus outbreak, is now home to a pair of billboards that smell like sweaty humans and exist merely to lure mosquitoes to their death. The billboard — the kind that is placed on a city sidewalk — emits a mixture of carbon dioxide and lactic acid aromas to mimic the scent of human sweat, attracting mosquitos from as far away as 2.5km. It is called, appropriately enough, the Mosquito Killer Board, and it was created by ad agencies NBS and Posterscope. Even better, blueprints for the board have been released for free.

Continue Reading

Snapchat excuses Bob Marley lens as 4/20 reaches its end

Snapchat excuses Bob Marley lens as 4/20 reaches its end

Today's 4/20, as you know, and I probably don't have to explain what that means. As expected, social media is filled with photos showing off a certain activity...and, unfortunately, awkward Snapchat photos featuring Bob Marley's likeness. Internet goers were quick to criticize the lens, which the company hasn't formally associated with 4/20, but is all wink wink about it. Still, despite the day's worth of public lashing, Snapchat has excused the filter with a canned statement.

Continue Reading

Study suggests monkeys crossed the ocean 21 million years ago

Study suggests monkeys crossed the ocean 21 million years ago

The discovery of seven small fossilized teeth led to a surprising revelation: 21 million or so years ago, Panamacebus transitus monkeys crossed 100 miles or more of ocean to travel from South America to North America, doing so at a time when the two weren’t connected together by land. The fossilized teeth were found during excavations at the Panama Canal, and pose bigger questions than they answer.

Continue Reading

Ancient Egyptian amulet found by 12-year-old in Jerusalem

Ancient Egyptian amulet found by 12-year-old in Jerusalem

A 12-year-old Israeli girl named Neshama Spielman recently discovered a rare Egyptian amulet that is about 3,200 years old. The amulet is said to have the name of a pharaoh on it, and it was found by Spielman while sifting through dirt as part of the Temple Mount Sifting Project. In a statement today, the Ir David Foundation announced the results of an analysis of the amulet, saying it features the name of Pharaoh Thutmose III.

Continue Reading

Mt. Paeku, the DPRK’s mysterious volcano, studied for first time

Mt. Paeku, the DPRK’s mysterious volcano, studied for first time

In North Korea, it is called Mount Paektu. In China, it’s known as Changbai. Measuring about 9,000ft in height, the volcano has laid dormant for many, many years after having once exploded so violently it sent debris as far away as Japan. To gain a better understanding of the volcano and when another eruption could occur, an international team of researchers have been granted access into North Korea to study it, possibly learning more about its history and what humans can expect from its future.

Continue Reading

Dwarf galaxy’s sudden arrival near Milky Way surprises researchers

Dwarf galaxy’s sudden arrival near Milky Way surprises researchers

An entire dwarf galaxy has caught astronomers by surprise, appearing in orbit around the Milky Way when, last they looked, it hadn’t been there. Called the Crater 2 dwarf galaxy, this ‘new’ Milky Way neighbor was recently detailed by researchers in a new study, and is said to be the fourth largest dwarf galaxy in the Milky Way. How did it avoid detection for so long? Among other things, its stars are spread far apart, making it dim and 'ghostly' in nature.

Continue Reading

Study suggests consciousness happens in small, fast intervals

Study suggests consciousness happens in small, fast intervals

A new study suggests that consciousness is not a constant state, but rather a series of intervals — frame rates, essentially — that play in series. The moments between each interval are spent in an unconscious state, though we obviously don’t perceive it that way. The work was done by researchers with the University of Zurich, Ulm University, and the EPFL; they came to their conclusion by studying both behavioral and psychological studies.

Continue Reading

Ancient humans likely gave Neanderthals herpes, tapeworms and more

Ancient humans likely gave Neanderthals herpes, tapeworms and more

According to a new study, Neanderthals may have been wiped out largely in part due to the diseases the ancestors of modern humans brought them. Herpes, tapeworms, tuberculosis, and stomach ulcers were among the issues humans brought Neanderthals; they weren’t prepared for these “tropical diseases,” and the end result was likely severe, affecting small groups of Neanderthals as they came into contact with migrating ancient humans.

Continue Reading

Prev 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next