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NYPD computers used to edit Wikipedia entries on police brutality

NYPD computers used to edit Wikipedia entries on police brutality

It's not unheard of for companies, politicians, and other famous people to be caught making edits to their own Wikipedia pages in order to appear in a better light or hide information. But now it looks like the New York Police Department has tried its hand at the Wikipedia censorship game, as edits to entries about several instances of police shootings and brutality from the last year have been traced to NYPD computers. Among the edits have been changes meant to be favorable to the officers, as well as requests to delete certain passages.

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The Guardian “clarifies” its Whisper allegations

The Guardian “clarifies” its Whisper allegations

After making a big stink about the issue last year, The Guardian is "clarifying" some of the accusations it flung in anonymous messaging service Whisper's face. Although The Guardian states that these are just clarifications and that the substance of its original reports remains true, those same clarifications have actually removed much of that substance which has painted Whisper as a villainous agent in the service of Big Brother. Now it seems that Whisper, while still reporting some things to the authorities, might not be so devious after all.

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Hubble finds an underground ocean on Jupiter’s largest moon

Hubble finds an underground ocean on Jupiter’s largest moon

The possibility of life on other planets just became more probable with NASA's Hubble telescope's latest discovery. Hubble uncovered evidence of a giant underground ocean on Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede. Ganymede is the largest moon in our entire solar system and has long drawn the focus of astronomers as they search for conditions that could be hospitable to life on other planets. The theory of underground oceans on Ganymede was first proposed on in the 1970's, but it wasn't until now that scientists uncovered solid evidence.

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London’s National Gallery is latest to ban selfie sticks

London’s National Gallery is latest to ban selfie sticks

We've seen some instances of galleries banning the use of selfie sticks, and now the National Gallery in London has decided to join them, making the decision to ban camera monopods due to a variety of reasons, not the least being that you might accidentally jab someone (or something) with it. The gallery already banned the use of tripods, and though it was originally lax when it came to the use of "selfie sticks", it has decided to include them in the tripod ban.

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Lawsuit against Facebook over kids’ purchases to proceed

Lawsuit against Facebook over kids’ purchases to proceed

Facebook has to face up to a class-action lawsuit from parents whose children made purchases on the social network without their permission, a judge has ruled. The order came today from U.S. District Judge Beth Labson Freeman, who gave the go-ahead to the class-action lawsuit seeking alterations to how Facebook goes about kids' transactions. The lawsuit will not, however, be able to go after a refund -- those who are looking to get a refund will need to go after that alone.

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This glorious celestial nursery is packed with baby stars

This glorious celestial nursery is packed with baby stars

The European Southern Observatory has taken the most detailed image yet of the southern constellation of Ara, otherwise known as The Altar, using the VLT Survey Telescope. The image was taken at the ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile, and in it we get an incredible look at clusters of stars, regions forming stars, emission nebulae, and more. This particular sliver of space is located about 4,000 light years from our own planet. We've a link to the high-resolution version after the jump!

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Acer’s having a New York City event in April

Acer’s having a New York City event in April

Acer has something up its sleeve for next month, and though we don't know exactly what it will be showing off, we do know when it'll be debuting a bunch of new products: on April 23 in New York City. There will be new PCs, tablets, handsets, monitors, "gaming products, and other things. This is the company's next big global press conference, and as such it'll be packed with details, all of which we'll have you for as they drop.

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Facebook pulls its ‘feeling fat’ emoji

Facebook pulls its ‘feeling fat’ emoji

Facebook, as you likely know, allows users to insert "feeling" something or other emotions into statuses, such as "feeling happy". One such option has been "feeling fat", which sparked criticism and more recently led to an online petition to get the listing removed. The reason revolved around its trivialization of potential eating disorders and other issues. Facebook originally pushed back against the criticism, but has since conceded, removing the option from the list of emotions (of which, some have noted, "fat" is not a feeling).

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USPTO’s new director is former Googler Michelle Lee

USPTO’s new director is former Googler Michelle Lee

We have been hearing rumbles for a long while now that former Google executive Michelle Lee could become the new head of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, and after a couple years of waiting, the news has become official. Back in October 2014, the Obama administration nominated Lee for the position, and as of today the Senate has confirmed her new role. Among other things, Lee previously served as the lead of Google's patents and patent strategy department.

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Canadian arrested after refusing to give phone passcode to border agent

Canadian arrested after refusing to give phone passcode to border agent

Earlier this week, a Canadian man was taken into custody by border agents after entering the country on an international flight from the Dominican Republic. Was he carrying prohibited items in his baggage, or maybe didn't have his travel documents in order? No, he merely refused to give up the passcode to his smartphone when stopped by agents for a search, on the grounds that the information was "personal." In what may set a legal precedent, this is Canada's first case in charging a citizen for refusing to provide their phone's passcode.

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