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The Black Glove game has been nixed

The Black Glove game has been nixed

Remember the “Black Glove” game we talked about back in October? It was said to be a surrealistic game, and its makers were seeking funding for it on Kickstarter. Unfortunately, and as sometimes happens with crowdfunding campaigns, the game has instead been cancelled, (“for now”, the makers tease), and in its place the team behind it is said to be working on new games. As you might have guessed, the Kickstarter funding didn’t come through, and so it seems it just wasn’t meant to be.

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Uncharted shipwreck discovered during MH370 search

Uncharted shipwreck discovered during MH370 search

A previously unknown shipwreck was discovered by searchers during a search for the missing flight MH370. The shipwreck is said to be in the southern Indian Ocean, and it involves a 19th century cargo ship. Which cargo ship isn't known, since it wasn't uncommon for them to sink during the voyage -- whether this one will end up being identified is unknown at this point, but researchers have taken a greater look at the shipwreck since its discovery. Pics after the jump!

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Bee colony losses in the US decrease a tiny bit

Bee colony losses in the US decrease a tiny bit

Bee population numbers are important, so much so that data on colony information has been tracked for the past several years, but particularly the last handful of years. The Apiary Inspectors of America, Bee Informed Partnership, and United States Department of Agriculture recently published the preliminary data on honey bee colony losses as determined in the ninth annual national survey. Though there was still losses (as expected), the numbers are slightly better than the last year, with the losses dipping below the previous winter's numbers.

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Facebook Instant Articles 101: The Basics

Facebook Instant Articles 101: The Basics

Today Facebook is pushing their newest service, Instant Articles, bringing full News Articles to the public through Facebook alone. With this service, publishers like National Geographic will be bringing full-on articles and videos to Facebook without any buffer. The companies that work with Facebook this way will receive ad revenue, and Google will - essentially - be cut out entirely. Unless you're looking at the article on an Android phone, of course. You'll be leaving all your news requirements to Facebook and the publishers they deem to be worthy.

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Facebook gets deeper into News biz with Instant Articles

Facebook gets deeper into News biz with Instant Articles

Gone were the days when Facebook was just about telling the world what you're feeling or showing off your latest vacation photos. Today, almost anything and everything is being shared on the social network, including sometimes important news and articles. But reading these longer pieces of information isn't as quick or seamless as reading a status update. Facebook, however, has a thing to say about that. It has just revealed Instant Articles, a feature and a platform that will let publishers put up faster loading and more interactive pieces. And maybe earn a buck or two in the process.

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Google’s ‘News & Weather’ Apple Watch app has ‘fail’ written all over it

Google’s ‘News & Weather’ Apple Watch app has ‘fail’ written all over it

Apple Watch apps are typically pretty good at being unique, but offering up an experience that’s both familiar and approachable. Some go a bit above and beyond the call of app duty, making Apple Watch features that stand out. Google isn’t one of them. Today, the largest conduit of information on Earth updated their News & Weather iOS app to support Apple Watch, and it’s not good. It’s barely passable, really. Compared to other apps that offer similar info, Google’s News & Weather falls well short of being exciting, much less interesting.

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Music industry braces for change: Streaming revenue overtakes downloads

Music industry braces for change: Streaming revenue overtakes downloads

In the past, when downloads began to surpass CD sales, it signaled a sea-change in the music industry. Labels had to adapt or die in the face of the changing music industry. As technology evolves, its power to shape the entertainment industry has proven to be a force to be reckoned with. Downloading even helped to topple the Tower Records of yesteryear. Nowadays, instead of paying for downloads of single tracks and albums at the iTunes store, listeners are tuning in to streaming services like Spotify to get their music, and customers are willing to pay for it, too.

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Almost 90% of health care providers hacked in last two years

Almost 90% of health care providers hacked in last two years

Cyber attackers have increasingly turned their attention to health care providers, of which nearly 90-percent were hacked over the course of the last two years. The growing number of cyber attacks against the health care industry is said to cost $6 billion annually, marking a trend where hackers shift focus from financial institutions and retailers to those with medical records. All in all, these attacks are said to have doubled in the United States over the last half decade.

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Survey: 29% of people would sacrifice a finger to keep Internet

Survey: 29% of people would sacrifice a finger to keep Internet

Many debate which is worse: a slow Internet connection or no Internet connection. For some, a complete lack of an Internet connection is something horrifying enough they'd rather sacrifice one of their fingers in exchange for keeping it. At least, that's according to a recent survey in the UK conducted by Cable.co.uk, which asked participants if they'd rather have a finger removed or lose their Internet access. Of those surveyed, 29-percent said they'd rather lose a finger. Hopefully not the use they use to swipe.

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Ceres bright spots caused by unknown “highly reflective material”

Ceres bright spots caused by unknown “highly reflective material”

Back in February, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft snapped some nearer pictures of the dwarf planet Ceres than previously obtained, and in them we saw a mystery: a couple of very bright spots on the surface. The cause of the spots was — and still is — unknown, but as the spacecraft draws closer to the planet it has been able to take increasingly clearer images. The latest show the same two bright spots are still there, only now they look more like they’re made of a bunch of smaller reflective patches.

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