news

Google Trends shows the most misspelled word in each state

Google Trends shows the most misspelled word in each state

We all have a special word or two that never looks quite right, that you have to stop and think about for a moment or two, that you may second guess yourself over. If you’re like me, you fire up Google and type the world out quickly to see whether you were right. According to Google, a bunch of people search for “how to spell” followed by a word, and it has used Trends to group the queries by state.

Continue Reading

Bacteria resistant to ‘last-resort’ antibiotics found for the first time in U.S.

Bacteria resistant to ‘last-resort’ antibiotics found for the first time in U.S.

Right up there with climate change and increased water scarcity is the issue of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and one particularly terrible variety of it -- bacteria resistant to so-called 'last resort' antibiotics, the very last-ditch solutions for resistant bugs. Now, for the first time, researchers have discovered this super-resistant bacteria in the United States, and they fear a gene in it (mcr-1) could spread to other types of bacteria.

Continue Reading

Google wins “fair use” ruling in Oracle’s $9bn Android trial

Google wins “fair use” ruling in Oracle’s $9bn Android trial

Bad news for Oracle and Larry Ellison today, as a San Francisco jury ruled in favor of Google and dismissed a $9bn attempt to take a bite out of Android. The lengthy legal saga had seen Oracle contend that, in developing Android, Google should've paid for a license to the Java programming language; not so, Google countered, insisting that it was all done under fair use given copyright law.

Continue Reading

Team finds mysterious cave circles were made by Neanderthals

Team finds mysterious cave circles were made by Neanderthals

About 176,500 years ago, Neanderthals created a pair of stone rings far within a cave (located in France) from stalagmites cut to similar heights ranging up to 16-inches. Why? No one knows. However, the discovery — which was made back in 1990 — was recently the subject of a study that found the structures date back to a time when Neanderthals would have made them. This further underscores reshaped notions of how intelligent Neanderthals were, and reveals a big mystery surrounding a possible ritual site.

Continue Reading

Kilauea volcano in Hawaii sprouts two ‘vigorous’ lava flows

Kilauea volcano in Hawaii sprouts two ‘vigorous’ lava flows

The U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has announced that Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano has a pair of new lava flows, and though neither lava flow is putting the nearby residential regions at risk, they have been described as “vigorous.” This is the same volcano into which NASA sent a robotic vehicle last year, and that caused evacuations two years ago.

Continue Reading

Modern oceans may be home to massive, seemingly mythical, squid

Modern oceans may be home to massive, seemingly mythical, squid

As if murky water you can't see through wasn't frightening enough, a newly published study suggests there could be massive squid -- the kind you read about in mythological texts and fantasy books -- swimming around present-day oceans. Search squid sizes on Google and you'll see notes about how squids top out around 13m/43ft in length -- according to this study, though, the correct size may be closer to 65ft.

Continue Reading

Microsoft has torpedoed its smartphone hopes

Microsoft has torpedoed its smartphone hopes

The writing has been on the wall for Microsoft's smartphone ambitions for some time, and now that wall is being demolished altogether. The software giant, unable to coax a viable mobile strategy out of Windows Phone, and now facing uncertainty around Windows 10 on phones, has announced plans to axe 1,850 jobs related to its smartphone business.

Continue Reading

Ancient beer discovery hints China had ‘advanced brewing’ 5,000 years ago

Ancient beer discovery hints China had ‘advanced brewing’ 5,000 years ago

China was home to ‘advanced beer-brewing’ techniques 5,000 years ago, a new study suggests, and it may have been the reason barley was imported and established in the region. Researchers have reached their conclusion based on the analysis of pottery vessel remnants with ancient beer residue inside; this ancient beer recipe includes millet, Job’s tears, tubers, and barley in the ingredients.

Continue Reading

Giant fireball streaked over northeastern US this week

Giant fireball streaked over northeastern US this week

The fireballs making surprise appearances in the sky have been happening in the U.S. lately (though the ones that crop up in Russia are usually much more exciting), and the latest one happened this week. The fireball was spotted by night owls in a few northeastern states, with most of the sightings seeming to come from the Boston region. The event was caught on camera by a few witnesses.

Continue Reading

Pavlok wearable (literally) shocks you into fiscal responsibility

Pavlok wearable (literally) shocks you into fiscal responsibility

Do you keep buying stuff you don’t need, and willpower isn’t enough to stop you? Enter the Pavlok, a wrist band that delivers a 255 volt shock to the wearer when they violate self-imposed spending limits. The wearable works via an integration with a banking platform for Intelligent Environments, a UK company. The setup is pretty straight-forward. Pavlok owners sign up for the service, connect their banking data and their Pavlok, then set limits on their spending. Go over that limit, and the system will notify Pavlok, which will dutifully give you an electric shock as punishment.

Continue Reading

Portugal ran solely on renewable energy for 107 hours straight

Portugal ran solely on renewable energy for 107 hours straight

Portugal recently hit a new clean energy milestone, managing to run for 107 hours straight solely on renewable energy. The energy sources were wind, water, and solar, with the trio — and the technology that harvests them — sustaining the region’s power needs from 6:45AM local time on May 7, a Saturday, to 5:45PM on the following Wednesday. The data comes from ZERO and the Portuguese Renewable Energy Association.

Continue Reading

Spiders’ sticky ‘glue’ also acts as microscopic web spools

Spiders’ sticky ‘glue’ also acts as microscopic web spools

Spiders create a special sort of ‘hybrid’ substance for their web that keeps the silky threads taunt even after they’re stretched out, according to researchers, and that discovery has been used to create a so-called liquid wire with the same properties. The spider’s substance is described as a watery glue deposited in tiny drops onto the threads; when a piece of silk is pulled on or stretched out, it spools within the droplets, keeping the threads taunt and thusly maintaining the structure of the web.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next