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TiVo unveils next-gen interface with predictions and fast content access

TiVo unveils next-gen interface with predictions and fast content access

TiVo has introduced its next-generation user interface, an offering that will better meet the wants and needs of modern users and bring with it some new features like Predictions. According to the company, this next-gen interface is designed to bring content from a bunch of different sources together. In addition, the UX will offer predictions about what it thinks you may want to watch based on your content viewing habits, as well as what time of the day it is and what device is being used to watch the shows.

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Russian river turns blood red in nation’s latest environmental mystery

Russian river turns blood red in nation’s latest environmental mystery

Russia, land of bears and ice and mystery. The nation is no stranger to fireballs falling from the sky and, more recently, huge deep craters appearing in the Siberian ice from seemingly nowhere. Now there's another mystery for locals to ponder: a river has turned blood red, something that doesn't yet have any determined cause but that, some think, may be the result of pollution. As it turns out, the Hope Metals Plant is located upstream and may be leaking.

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Pistachio scarcity looms as droughts decimate farms

Pistachio scarcity looms as droughts decimate farms

If you love pistachios, stock up while you can: the next few years or more may see a scarcity of the nut as long-running droughts in Iran have decimated entire pistachio farms and have others on the brink of collapse. Pistachios are a vital export for Iran, coming second only to crude oil, with the nation’s various pistachio farms producing 250,000 tons last year. Extreme water scarcity in the nation, though, has led to mass farm loss and more farms are sure to fail soon if something doesn't change.

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Nazi U-boat seen for first time since sinking in 1942

Nazi U-boat seen for first time since sinking in 1942

The German ‘U-boat’ submarine U-576 has been seen for the first time since sinking about 74 years ago. Entombed within are the 45 German sailors who went down with the sub; according to the researchers who discovered it, the hatches are still closed, and most of the other elements — minus the now-rotted wooden deck pieces — are still present. The discovery marks the end of a mission that has been ongoing since 2009, providing an actual look at the vessel that was first 'seen' by sonar in 2014.

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Amazon’s new anti-counterfeiting fee has sellers upset

Amazon’s new anti-counterfeiting fee has sellers upset

Counterfeit goods harm both the person unknowingly buying the product and the company behind the real products. Amazon has worked to keep these counterfeit goods off its website, but nothing is perfect and users are, unfortunately, on the receiving end of fake products at times. Word has it the company has seen the number of counterfeit products growing, and so it is attempting to keep those sellers away by instituting an across-the-board selling fee.

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Miniature lion fossils lead to discovery of new species

Miniature lion fossils lead to discovery of new species

A new species of miniature marsupial lion has been discovered thanks to a newly uncovered fossil found in Queensland. The new species has been dubbed the Microleo attenboroughi, in honor of Sir Attenborough and in recognition of the creature’s small size. The miniature lion is said to have lived in Northern Australia’s rainforests about 18 million years ago.

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Microsoft launches portal to report hate speech on its products

Microsoft launches portal to report hate speech on its products

Microsoft has launched a portal in which users can report hate speech located on one or more of several of its products, including OneDrive, Xbox Live, and more. Because it is possible that content could be removed erroneously, Microsoft has also launched a portal through which affected users can request that their disabled content be reinstated. This is merely a refinement of the company's existing content policies.

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Massachusetts is considering a time zone change

Massachusetts is considering a time zone change

The promise of summer’s end is everywhere you look: school has started, stores are stocking autumn products, and the days are noticeably becoming shorter. Soon enough, the days will be so short they will, for some people, be dark before dinner time. That prospect is upsetting, yes, and Massachusetts is tired of dealing with it. Per a newly signed bill, the state will conduct research into the idea of changing the state’s time zone.

Short daylight hours are dreaded by just about everyone, and they have a real effect on daily lives: some people develop depression during the darker days, physical activities suffers, and many people report being less productive during the height of winter darkness. For states with such dim winters, there’s also another issue to contend with: young populations fleeing to states where winter sunsets aren't so early in the day.

During the darkest point of winter, the sun starts to set shortly after 4PM in Boston, giving kids very little daylight to enjoy after school. The state may solve the issue, though, by leaving the eastern time zone in favor of the Atlantic one, and ditching the tiresome model of changing the clocks back and forth. Under such a model, the mornings would stay dark a little longer, but the evenings would stay bright longer, too.

The state has expressed concerns about college students fleeing for brighter states, but it hasn’t determined fully whether this mass flight is due to the short daylight hours during winter or something else. Still, the argument is being made that longer days, as well as the elimination of daylight saving time, will be better for the population’s overall health.

At the end of the day, though, Massachusetts is exploring this possible time zone change as part of a larger economic development plan, and so any changes will likely have to be found fruitful for the economy. The research will be ongoing for months, with the report of findings not being due until July 2017.

SOURCE: Bloomberg
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Million dead fish wash up in New Jersey: low oxygen levels blamed

Million dead fish wash up in New Jersey: low oxygen levels blamed

This week, more than an estimated million dead fish washed ashore in New Jersey, something experts are saying was likely caused by a combination of events, among them being inadequate levels of oxygen in the water. The fish were found in water bodies in the northern New Jersey city Keansburg; officials finished cleaning the dead fish remains this morning, all the while increasing the estimate of how many died.

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Researchers suggest ancient round ‘tools’ were actually weapons

Researchers suggest ancient round ‘tools’ were actually weapons

Ancient stone objects are often rudimentary in design and, due to their age and possible exposure to the elements, sometimes lacking in finer details. This can make it difficult to discern what exactly any particular discovery is, and few things are more ambiguous than simple stone spheres. Were previously discovered round hand-sized stones used as tools? Researchers have thought so, but a new study suggests they may actually have been used as projectile weapons.

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Endangered pack of gray wolves to be exterminated in Washington soon

Endangered pack of gray wolves to be exterminated in Washington soon

Washington state officials have been given the go-ahead to exterminate a pack of 11 gray wolves after they were determined to be behind attacks against cattle. The state is estimated to only have about 90 gray wolves total spanning 19 packs, and the controversial decision to eliminate one of the packs — called the Profanity Peak pack — will reduce the overall percentage of these endangered gray wolves significantly. The pack, however, has killed more than a dozen adult cows and calves with no sign of stopping.

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‘Adonis’ is Europe’s oldest tree with an age of 1,075 years

‘Adonis’ is Europe’s oldest tree with an age of 1,075 years

Europe’s oldest living tree is located in northern Greece and is, according to a team of researchers, more than 1,075 years old. Dubbed ‘Adonis,’ the tree is of the Bosnian pine variety, and it has recently been dated using dendrochronology — the science of analyzing tree rings. Using this data and the data of similarly old trees could help scientists understand the climate and related history of the region, as well as the effect those changes have on the trees.

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