networking

Acer Aspire X1200 HTPC BIOS issue can kill HDMI

Acer Aspire X1200 HTPC BIOS issue can kill HDMI

Problems appear to be afoot with Acer's recently announced Aspire X1200 HTPC.  Several users are complaining that their network cards would go into sleep mode and then refuse to wake up without a restart; when told by Acer's tech support team to update the BIOS, the network issue is resolved but the HDMI output no longer works.

Open-Mesh offers mesh-network WiFi extension for $49

Open-Mesh offers mesh-network WiFi extension for $49

WiFi is great until you start reaching the fringes of your router's range, at which point throughput slows to a trickle and you start dreaming of nice, reliable ethernet cables.  Happily there's an alternative to snaking CAT-5 around your skirting boards; Open-Mesh makes Mini-Routers that, when plugged in and registered, automatically create a mesh-network and thus boost your WiFi coverage.

TRENDnet TEW-672GR dual-band WiFi N router

TRENDnet TEW-672GR dual-band WiFi N router

TRENDnet have begun shipping their 300Mbps Dual Band Wireless N Gigabit Router, the TEW-672GR.  Capable of using either the 2.4GHz or 5GHz bands, the TEW-672GR also has four gigabit ethernet ports and a "double firewall" using both Network Address Translation (NAT) and Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI) protocols.

Belkin Powerline AV – Ethernet over power at 200Mb/s

Belkin Powerline AV – Ethernet over power at 200Mb/s

Belkin is about to put a 200Mb/s powerline Ethernet adaptor in the market. The Powerline AV+ uses an integrated hub to share the connection between the three devices plugged in. These three ports however are not gigabit ports, they are 10/100 Mb/s Ethernet ports.

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Linksys WRT610N router for simultaneous dual-band WiFi N

Linksys WRT610N router for simultaneous dual-band WiFi N

Linksys have released their latest WiFi router, the WRT610N, the claim to fame of which is its ability to simultaneously maintain WiFi band-N connections on both 2.4GHz and 5GHz.  The benefit is in being able to use each band for separate, bandwidth intensive applications; 5GHz has a shorter range but higher throughput, while 2.4GHz is backward compatible with earlier WiFi versions that would usually slow the whole network down.

VIA OpenBook opened-up: connectivity flexibility video demo

VIA OpenBook opened-up: connectivity flexibility video demo

Hopefully VIA know - and sanction- what their marketing team is up to, as Tim Brown could be in some trouble otherwise for taking apart the company's OpenBook reference budget ultraportable and filming the whole operation.  Tim's intention is to show off the flexibility of the design; rather than soldering all of the connectivity options to the mainboard, which is a common way to save space, the OpenBook uses two industry-standard PCI Express Mini card-slots.  That leaves it up to manufacturers adopting the design to chose which WWAN, WiFi, GPS or other options they plug in.

HP MediaSmart Connect wireless HD media streamer up for pre-order

HP MediaSmart Connect wireless HD media streamer up for pre-order

First spotted back in January at CES, HP networked media player - then known as the MediaSmart Receiver - is finally available for pre-order. Now called the MediaSmart Connect, it still has WiFi a/b/g and dual-band draft 802.11n, two USB ports for plugging in removeable storage and a bay for HP's Pocket Media Drives. Output is via HDMI or component video with optical audio, and a convenient front-mounted button toggles between 1080i and 720p.

Denon $499 ethernet cable: words fail

Denon $499 ethernet cable: words fail

Half of me wants to call this a hoax, while the other half of me is wondering whether not using Denon's $499 AK-DL1 ethernet cable means my broadband is depressed and sluggish.  At over $8 an inch, the 1.5m cable is, obviously, intended for the "audio enthusiast" (read: "gullible rich guy"), and the ideal way to hook up your Denon Link components.

5-mile WiFi b/g bridge for bargain $318

5-mile WiFi b/g bridge for bargain $318

Networking company HD Communcations has announced a low-cost WiFi bridge with up to five miles line-of-sight range.  The HD26200 consists of two high performance Ubiquiti network radios with integrated 17dbi dual polarity antennas, and can bridge WiFi b and g networks.  Best of all is the price: just $318.

TiVo network control via Telnet, courtesy of Crestron

TiVo network control via Telnet, courtesy of Crestron

After some clever lateral thinking over at the TiVo Community forums there's now a way for users to remotely control their PVR via anything with network access and a telnet client.  It's all thanks to Crestron, who worked with TiVo back when the company was developing v9.1 of the set-top box software; they added support for the home automation company's touchscreens and did so in a relatively straightforward way.  Telnet into your TiVo using port 31339 and you can use almost forty different commands to input numbers, control channels, set recordings and more.

Check out the video of the system in action after the cut

Hawking parabolic WiFi adaptor boosts range by 600%

Hawking parabolic WiFi adaptor boosts range by 600%

Long-distance WiFi accessories are nothing new, in fact you can craft one yourself from something as innocent as a Pringles tube, but Hawking Technologies have an option if hacking isn't your forte.  The Hi-Gain Wireless-300N is a high-gain dish adaptor, that hooks up via USB and can supposedly extend wireless range by up to 600-percent.  Supporting WiFi in b, g and n flavors, they're also claiming up to twelve times the data throughput.

NuVo upgrades their music server to 500GB – upgrade from your 160GB version

NuVo  upgrades their music server to 500GB – upgrade from your 160GB version

Alright, I’ll admit, I’m impressed with NuVo and the systems they offer. However it seems they should probably let someone else make the music servers if a 500GB music server is going to sell for $3000. The thin profile of this component, sleek design, triple outputs, networking capabilities, and OLED screen make it an interesting proposition.

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