Net Neutrality

Five US ISPs accused of holding the internet to ransom

Five US ISPs accused of holding the internet to ransom

Five US internet providers have been accused of "deliberately harming" the web experience for their customers, with claims that the companies are purposefully keeping things congested so as to extract cash from content providers. The US ISPs - described as "large Broadband consumer networks with a dominant or exclusive market share in their local market" - and one European ISP are not named by "internet middleman" Level 3, though the company has previously requested that the FCC look into AT&T's handling of networks.

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Mozilla offers FCC a fresh take on net neutrality

Mozilla offers FCC a fresh take on net neutrality

Net neutrality is a hot-button topic, and the FCC currently hovers a finger right over it. A new proposal by Mozilla has some interesting fundamentals in place, and deftly challenges the FCC’s understanding of the matter altogether. If Mozilla has their way, the FCC will turn the Internet on its ear — and that may be the best thing for all.

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FCC proposing skewed Net Neutrality rules: preferential treatment

FCC proposing skewed Net Neutrality rules: preferential treatment

It’s become apparent this week that the Federal Communications Commission plans on proposing a set of rules which would affect the way we access the internet. While in the past, "Net Neutrality" bills have suggested there be no blocking or preferential treatment of or for companies with webpages and web provider networks. This week the FCC is proposing that these companies can have their cake and eat it too.

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EU lawmakers approve plan to kill roaming charges and impose new net neutrality rules

EU lawmakers approve plan to kill roaming charges and impose new net neutrality rules

Lawmakers in the European Union have approved some tough new laws for the Union that have to do with eliminating roaming charges and putting new rules in place for net neutrality. Once the final ruling is in, the new rules will go into effect across the entire 28-member European union. While the lawmakers have approved the rules, the proposals still need to be approved by the next European Parliament to be elected next month.

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FCC isn’t giving up on Net Neutrality

FCC isn’t giving up on Net Neutrality

The FCC has outlined its reworked plan to achieve net neutrality, following its defeat in the federal courts last month, including the possibility of reclassifying ISPs altogether so as to force through rules. The Federal Communications Commission was told it did not have the authority to stop broadband providers like Verizon and Comcast from prioritizing select internet traffic or, conversely, slowing other traffic, but the court pointed out that it may already have the power in other ways under existing telecoms laws. Now, FCC Commissioner Tom Wheeler says he will "accept that invitation" from the court.

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Net Neutrality is a mess: We can’t even decide what the Internet is

Net Neutrality is a mess: We can’t even decide what the Internet is

The internet as we know it is in peril. Verizon's victory in the court of appeal this week, seeing the FCC's attempts to regulate broadband providers in the name of Net Neutrality defeated, has the potential to change how we access the internet and web services like Netflix, Hulu, and others more fundamentally than 2013's SOPA threatened to. In question isn't whether internet access should be a free-for-all, but what it is fundamentally, legally classified as, and who therefore has control over what gets shuttled through: Verizon and the broadband providers, in control of the "pipes", or the FCC as protector of infrastructure that uses public rights of way. For all both sides are claiming some degree of victory this week, we're still no closer to settling that fundamental question.

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Obama “committed” to Net Neutrality as Verizon hypes “two sided” web

Obama “committed” to Net Neutrality as Verizon hypes “two sided” web

President Obama won't take the appeal court striking down the FCC's net neutrality rules lying down, with a White House statement saying that the commander in chief is still "committed to an open internet." The surprise decision earlier today that US broadband providers could charge content companies to deliver at higher speeds has prompted renewed fears of a multi-tier internet where the best service is available only to those with the deepest pockets. Now, Obama has waded in with his renewed support for the principle of net neutrality.

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FCC Net Neutrality powers struck down by federal court

FCC Net Neutrality powers struck down by federal court

This morning a court has struck down the FCC's ability to enforce certain key "Net Neutrality Rules" on companies that would favor certain kinds of web traffic over others. That's what Net Neutrality protects the public against, after all: with a "neutral" law in place, all web data is treated equally. Without these rules in place, companies that provide web connectivity are able to legally place restrictions on some content while making other content run faster - whichever they do so choose.

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