nest

Logitech Harmony now speaks with Nest Protect, Rheem EcoNet

Logitech Harmony now speaks with Nest Protect, Rheem EcoNet

The number of smart appliances you can put in your home is increasing exponentially to the point that keeping track of them, much less controlling them, is becoming a chore, which nullifies the premise of a smart home. The peace of mind that comes with orchestrating all these disparate pieces together is exactly the promise that Logitech Harmony makes. Today, it is increasing that peace of mind by adding Nest's Protect smart smoke detectors and Rheem's EcoNet smart water heater to the list of supported devices.

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Scout Alarm DIY security system now ‘Works with Nest’

Scout Alarm DIY security system now ‘Works with Nest’

Scout, the do-it-yourself home alarm system that has standalone connectivity, is now working with Nest. In a blog post, Scout says their system now works with Nest “to enable seamless access and control of your Nest device(s) within your Scout account.” Your Scout Alarm will now work with Nest’s Smoke + Carbon Monoxide detector, as well as Nest Learning Thermostat. Though the reasoning for grouping your thermostat and home security system together might not be immediately clear, Scout has outlined several ways it can be handy.

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‘Nest Audio’ job listing suggests voice control could be the future

‘Nest Audio’ job listing suggests voice control could be the future

Nest wants to be the central hub of your home, which was made evident by their ‘Works with Nest’ platform, introduced last year. By allowing other IoT gadgets to link to Nest’s new platform, your home is tied together via the thermostat, of all things. Though third-party support will remain intact, it seems Nest is also extending their own reach into your home. A new job listing for ‘Nest Audio’ wants someone who can head the new team, though it’s not exactly clear why just yet.

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Google patent wants to make even doorknobs smart

Google patent wants to make even doorknobs smart

Google acquired Nest and then Dropcam, so it isn't much of a surprise that it might want more. If there was any doubt there, this latest patent, filed just months after the two acquisitions, would dispel all that. It might be deceptively called "Security Scoring in a Smart-sensored Home", but the message it sends is clear. Google wants to make homes smarter, and probably gather more information than you're willing to hand over through browsers and phones. And like any other house, it all starts at the door.

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‘Terribly buggy’ Nest Protects can’t be hushed for one unlucky Googler

‘Terribly buggy’ Nest Protects can’t be hushed for one unlucky Googler

Any time a smoke alarm goes off, it’s troubling. Either your home is on fire, or the blackened tuna you’re searing caused a panic in your home. When cooking, getting your smoke alarm to silence quickly becomes priority one, but what if it just won’t shut up? Even worse — what if there was no smoke to begin with? Google’s Brad Fitzpatrick recently uploaded a video to YouTube, showing just what happens when your Nest Protect smoke alarm can’t get right, and just won’t shut up.

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Nest says annual savings pay for hardware in two years

Nest says annual savings pay for hardware in two years

The Nest thermostat is a hefty spend. At $250, it’s not something you’d purchase without much though, like you probably did with the Chromecast. Nest claims to save you money, but varying reports go into how much it actually ends up saving you. Today, Nest is averaging the weight of three separately funded reports, and saying the average household will save about $138 per year they have a Nest. In two years’ time, your Nest will have paid for itself, if these reports are indicative of your use and savings.

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Luna smart mattress cover learns to keep your bed toasty

Luna smart mattress cover learns to keep your bed toasty

You better be paying attention to the latest smart home trends, because before you know it, the Internet of Things will be crawling with you into bed. Take for example Luna, touted to be the world's first smart mattress cover. It can learn from your habits, preferences and even your very sleep patterns in order to set the perfect temperature for your bed. What's more, Luna can even talk with your other smart home appliances to orchestrate the perfect morning wake up routine.

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Misfit Flash fitness wearable now also a connected life gadget

Misfit Flash fitness wearable now also a connected life gadget

the Misfit Flash may not be the flashiest fitness wearable around, but it’s handy. A small Bluetooth button, which then slides into a watchband or clip-on, Flash is good at tracking your activity levels. Starting today, Flash is getting a whole lot handier, as Misfit announces they’ve integrated several new platforms into their own service. To round out your connected life, Misfit now interacts with Yo, Spotify, Nest, August, Logitech, and IFTTT. With a few taps or long presses, you can automate your life like never before.

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Ford R&D Palo Alto puts driverless cars in pole position

Ford R&D Palo Alto puts driverless cars in pole position

Ford CEO Mark Fields may have been critical of the auto industry’s attempts to over-hype driverless cars, but that doesn’t mean the company isn’t working on its own model at its new Research and Innovation Center in Palo Alto, California. The car firm has snagged a former Apple engineer, Dragos Maciuca, to lead its innovation efforts, heading projects like autonomous and remotely-piloted vehicles, integrating the dashboard with the smart home - including hooking up with the Google-owned Nest thermostat - and leveraging GPU acceleration for things like swifter speech recognition.

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It’s time to hit reset – not delete – on Google Glass

It’s time to hit reset – not delete – on Google Glass

Farewell, Explorers. Goodbye, Glass. Google's decision to spin out its controversial wearable into a standalone business was instantly portrayed by many as the often-predicted death of the headset, but the reality is less clear-cut. Glass' struggles saw early enthusiasm sour when questions around privacy and usefulness collided head-on with anti-ostentatious-geek sentiment, and the "face computer" never managed to restore its reputation. While the temptation may be to hit delete on the whole saga, I'd argue a Glass reboot with far greater focus on how head-worn wearables might fit into our daily lives would be a far more rewarding strategy.

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