NASA

NASA will send your name to Mars on a microchip

NASA will send your name to Mars on a microchip

NASA will send your name to Mars on a microchip if you sign up before the midnight deadline on September 8. Upon signing up, users are presented with a futuristic-looking boarding pass including a “frequent flyer number” and other details, such as the launch site location, rocket, arrival site, when the launch is scheduled, and more. This batch of names (as you might know, NASA had done this before) will be shipping out with the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, more commonly called InSight.

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NASA building microsatellites to better track & predict hurricanes

NASA building microsatellites to better track & predict hurricanes

In an effort to prevent a reoccurrence of the Hurricane Katrina disaster from ten years ago, NASA is currently working on project that will see satellites used to observe hurricanes from space, and improve forecasts of their movements. The mission is called CYGNSS (Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System), and relies on eight microsatellites — as opposed to one, large satellite — working in a group. Together, they will be the first such crafts to be able to frequently look into the inner core of an active storm.

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Keep calm and carry on: no asteroid coming, says NASA

Keep calm and carry on: no asteroid coming, says NASA

A lot of things go viral on the Internet these days, from cat photos to stupid videos to inspiring stories. Sadly, misinformation is just as easily, or even more easily, spread these days thanks to the wide reach of the Net. The most recent scare play on the fears and imagination surrounding a favorite doomsday scenario in recent years, at least before the zombies came. But NASA's Near-Earth Object Observations Program is reassuring that public that no giant asteroid is coming to destroy a good chunk of the earth any time soon.

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NASA shares the real tech behind Ridley Scott’s “The Martian”

NASA shares the real tech behind Ridley Scott’s “The Martian”

Today NASA is showing the real science behind the film "The Martian". Not just the bits and pieces you'll know already - space travel and all that - but the technology you might not have known exists. NASA has the technology to make MOST of what you'll see in The Martian a reality. All they need is time and funding. And Matt Damon, of course. Can't forget Matt Damon. And Ridley Scott. This all begins with "the Hab", or The Habitat, the place where our hero Watney spends his days in the film.

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Watch Japan launch a rocket with supplies for the International Space Station

Watch Japan launch a rocket with supplies for the International Space Station

Only a few hours ago, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) successfully launched an unmanned rocket carrying supplies for the International Space Station (ISS). The Kounotori-5 departed from the southern tip of Japan on Wednesday night local time, or just before 8:00 AM Eastern. The successful launch comes as good news to all in the space exploration community, as the last few months have seen a number of resupply missions end in failure, including SpaceX's launch of a Falcon 9 rocket in June.

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NASA finally answers lingering lunar question

NASA finally answers lingering lunar question

The big experiments in space might seem like they're happening on Mars or even further afield, but NASA's latest discovery proves there's plenty to learn closer to home. Thanks to the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft, we now know that the atmosphere of our own moon contains neon, something suspected all the way back in the days of the Apollo missions, but until now unconfirmed.

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NASA’s Cassini to give Saturn’s moon Dione one last flyby

NASA’s Cassini to give Saturn’s moon Dione one last flyby

NASA will be getting one of its best look to date of Saturn's moon Dione today, as the Cassini spacecraft will be flying within 295 miles of its surface. This will be the fifth and final close flyby that Cassini conducts of the pockmarked Dione before its mission of studying Saturn concludes in 2017. Scientists are hoping the data gathered will tell them if the icy moon is geologically alive and active, similar to Enceladus, another of Saturn's satellites.

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Aerojet Rocketdyne completes sixth rocket engine test

Aerojet Rocketdyne completes sixth rocket engine test

Aerojet Rocketdyne has announced it successfully finished a complete verification test with its RS-25 rocket engine, which will be powering NASA’s Space Launch System in the future. The full duration was 535 seconds long; the test was performed alongside NASA at its Stennis Space Center. This marks the half-dozen test out of a planned seven-test series. The first test took place back in January. The RS-25 rocket engine was formerly referred to as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), and spent decades in service powering the space shuttle, according to Aerojet.

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NASA’s latest contest seeks smartwatch app for astronauts

NASA’s latest contest seeks smartwatch app for astronauts

NASA contests are nothing new -- it has one every so often seeking different things from the public for its various efforts. The space agency has initiated a new one, this time oddly enough through the freelancing website Freelancer, where it is seeking entries related to a smartwatch app for astronauts. According to the contest’s description, NASA has an interest in smartwatch technology, and is planning to use such devices to aid astronauts. Ordinary watch apps won’t do, however, and so it is looking for the creations of the public. The space agency has detailed its requirements, but developers are given freedom around them.

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Perseid meteor shower peaked with 100 meteors an hour

Perseid meteor shower peaked with 100 meteors an hour

Last night brought a grand celestial show for those who were in regions with agreeable weather. The Perseid meteor shower was complemented by a lack of intrusive moonlight, and as a result many got a solid look at the meteors as they blazed by. The shower started in earnest earlier this week and increased over a couple days to hit its peak last night. Very early this morning was arguably the best time to have watched the shower, but it you go out tonight you'll still be able to catch the stragglers.

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The Universe is dying – across all wavelengths

The Universe is dying – across all wavelengths

While it's been widely accepted that the Universe is slowly fading since the late 1990s, a study published today shows the great extent to which its death is occurring. "The Universe has basically sat down on the soft, pulled up a blanket, and is about to nod off for an eternal doze," suggested Simon Driver of ICRAR, lead author on the study. Measurements of energy output of each of 200,000 galaxies has been done at 21 wavelengths, from far infrared back down to ultraviolet. As broad a wavelength range as possible was studied by researchers who've now concluded that, yes, the Universe is indeed fading out.

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Space lettuce: astronauts eat first-ever off-world veggies

Space lettuce: astronauts eat first-ever off-world veggies

The first fresh food grown in a microgravity environment - off of the planet Earth - have been consumed by astronauts aboard the International Space Station this week. Members of Expedition 44 shared video of their harvest and consumption of the lettuce they grew, part of an experiment called Veg-01. Before samples of the lettuce are sent back to the surface of our planet, astronauts took their first bites. This experiment was started by Expedition 39's flight engineer Steve Swanson back in May of 2014.

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