NASA

Smithsonian wants to digitize Neil Armstrong’s space suit

Smithsonian wants to digitize Neil Armstrong’s space suit

Astronaut Neil Armstrong's historically significant space suit is the latest subject of restoration at the Smithsonian. The crew hopes to not only fully restore the suit itself, but to digitize its image. With the latest technology in imaging and 3D scanning, the Smithsonian hopes to turn the suit into a digital piece of material. With the media created, the suit will be able to be looked at and explored in classrooms and museums around the world - not to mention the virtual reality space for all people everywhere.

Continue Reading

NASA releases hypnotizing new image of Earth

NASA releases hypnotizing new image of Earth

While much of the buzz from NASA recently has been about the New Horizons' trip to Pluto, the agency hasn't totally forgotten about the blue orb we inhabit. Captured from a camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory, NASA has just released the satellite's first view of the sunlit side of Earth from 1 million miles away, and it sure is stunning. The image shows North and Central America, with the Caribbean islands located in the turquoise areas in the center.

Continue Reading

New Horizons reveal Pluto’s wildly varied landscape

New Horizons reveal Pluto’s wildly varied landscape

This morning the folks behind NASA's New Horizons mission revealed the heart of Pluto. What the New Horizons crew revealed today is a number of deep differences in areas on different sides of the planet. They've also gone over the escaping atmosphere surrounding Pluto. What we're able to see here is a set of two - at least two - very different sorts of landscape on the dwarf planet Pluto. Today's lesson is this - Pluto is not just one simple, flat piece of rock. It's not even just a lumpy rock - it's a whole lot more complicated than that.

Continue Reading

Space is scary: ISS crew cowers from space junk peril

Space is scary: ISS crew cowers from space junk peril

Astronauts on the ISS were forced to take cover in an emergency Soyuz capsule today, as debris from an old satellite threatened to pummel the space station. Damage to the orbiting research facility was, thankfully, avoided, NASA has confirmed, but the unexpectedly close pass of broken chunks of Russian weather satellite forced emergency precautions as there was no time to move the ISS out of the way.

Continue Reading

Latest New Horizons images put Pluto’s icy geology in spotlight

Latest New Horizons images put Pluto’s icy geology in spotlight

The fruits of New Horizons' trip to Pluto continue to emerge, with the latest photos showing fresh mountain peaks and raising new questions for scientists. In the latest batch of images beamed back from the spacecraft, NASA has identified an unusual depression running across Charon, one of Pluto's moons, slashing across the rock with a length of around 240 miles and complete with a central peak. However, it's not the only geological anomaly New Horizons has spotted.

Continue Reading

The best Pluto photos from New Horizons so far

The best Pluto photos from New Horizons so far

New Horizons successfully reaches and passes Pluto, taking photos during a 22-hour period of observation. What we're doing here is collecting the best of the best - which, incidentally, may end up being the whole collection. Straight from NASA to your eyeballs, these are the first images of Pluto from within several thousand miles of the dwarf planet. You can also have a peek at a large set of images captured over the past few weeks by New Horizons by hitting up our New Horizons tag portal.

Continue Reading

New Horizons phones home to say it’s OK

New Horizons phones home to say it’s OK

Pluto may be the god of death, but that has no bearing on NASA's greatest achievement yet. Dozens of sleep-deprived, and most likely teary-eyed, scientists and engineers at NASA awaited in both anticipation and dread as New Horizon's diagnostics data came flowing in a bit before 9 PM Eastern. The good news? New Horizons is safe and sound and didn't encounter any space debris that endangered its flight or its existence. The bad news? Now it has to beam down tons of data for scientists to drool over for the next months, even years!

Continue Reading

We’ve passed Pluto – where are the photos?

We’ve passed Pluto – where are the photos?

Now that we've passed Pluto, you might be wondering why we're not looking at brand new up-close photos of all sorts. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has an antenna that must remain stationary at all times - it's not attached to a robotic arm or anything. Because of this, and because the craft was only passing extremely close to Pluto for a short period of time, the team wisely decided to utilize the time collecting data from our spacey cousin rather than sending back data as fast as they could. In short - photos and data are coming inside this week, just not right this minute.

Continue Reading

See the best color image of Pluto taken just before New Horizons flyby

See the best color image of Pluto taken just before New Horizons flyby

As NASA's New Horizons spacecraft approached Pluto for the much-anticipated flyby at 7:49 AM ET this morning, the agency released the final and best color image of Pluto yet to be taken. And because Pluto is such a social media celebrity, NASA even posted the image to Instagram first. The photo offer a stunningly clear look at Pluto, as it was taken from only 476,000 miles away, NASA said, at roughly 4:00 PM ET on July 13th.

Continue Reading

New Horizons proves Pluto is larger than we thought

New Horizons proves Pluto is larger than we thought

The problem with deducing composition and sizes through a telescope is that you won't really know how accurate or far off your models are until you get a first-hand, or even a second-hand close up. For decades, almost a century, that has been the problem with Pluto's size ever since it was discovered way back in 1930. Thanks to New Horizons, however, scientists are now able to turn that dream into reality and answer one of the biggest questions of all time: how big is Pluto really?

Continue Reading

As New Horizons passes Pluto, 22-hours of silence

As New Horizons passes Pluto, 22-hours of silence

NASA won't see any images or get any data from Pluto flyby mission New Horizons for 22 hours after it begins its closest flyby of the dwarf planet. There are two reasons for what's effectively a radio silence. The first reason is the applicable power. Every single resource the craft passing Pluto is capable of using will be going toward capturing imagery and data on and around Pluto. That should be obvious. We've waited years - we can wait a few more hours.

Continue Reading

Pluto approaching: New Horizons’ scientist answers 4 questions

Pluto approaching: New Horizons’ scientist answers 4 questions

New Horizons' Ralph Instrument Scientist Dennis Reuter speaks up today about th eminent approach of the mission to Pluto. Also speaking on his position with the Goddard Space observatory, Reuter tapped into Pluto and the exploration of the Kuiper Belt - our solar system's "last frontier." Reuter spoke up about the data collection this mission will execute, seeking out information on Pluto's chemical and atmospheric makeup using the Ralph spectrometer. This mission's apex will be reached tomorrow at 11:50 UTC - that's 4:50 AM Pacific Time, 7:50 AM Eastern Time.

Continue Reading