nanotechnology

The Daily Slash: April 23rd 2010

The Daily Slash: April 23rd 2010

Welcome to Friday! You made it! Don't you feel proud of yourself? We're proud of you for making it through your long, arduous, and probably ridiculously busy work week, and landing squarely right here, with us, for this edition of the Daily Slash. Tonight, in the Best of R3, we've got a pre-order option for an Android-based tablet, the life expectancy of the iPad Camera Kit accessory, and another kind of Samsung Galaxy S. In the Dredge 'Net, the police are looking into the iPhone HD/4G debacle, there's a kitchen out there that might destroy you, and even more bad news for Palm.

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Graphene may be used for 1,000GHz chips

Graphene may be used for 1,000GHz chips

Graphene might be the next material of choice for making processor chips, according to an MIT report. In fact, Graphene, a substance discovered in 2004 that consists of pure carbon, could allow for faster speeds than ever thought possible.

The current research shows that a frequency multiplier could be created, which works to double a signal and likewise doubles a processor's clocking speed. Color me impressed! This idea is not new, but it is certainly new when applied to Graphene, which possesses only an atom's thickness.

So, what's so exciting about this? Well, Graphene chips could make for processors that run between 500GHz and 1,000GHz. That's quite a leap from the current 5GHz chips, wouldn't you say? We should see a commercial version of this technology within two years, according to MIT.

[via PC Pro]...

Nanotechnology-infused material is completely water resistant

Nanotechnology-infused material is completely water resistant

Now this is pretty interesting. If nanotechnology news gives you the warm fuzzies then you'll be pleased to learn that some chemists at the University of Zurich have created a new fabric that can't ever get wet. Ever. I mean, it was in water for two months and it's still not wet!

This material is made from polyester which were covered with 40nm-wide silicone nanofilaments. Since these filaments are so tiny and so spiky, they make it so water actually sits above the material in a sort of pocket. This is a permanent state. The material won't ever be made wet.

So what are the potential applications of this technology? Well, it reduces drag in water by up to 20%, for one. It can also serve as a self-cleaning cloth. Regardless of how it ends up being used, this is still pretty cool and presents numerous opportunities....

iPosture keeps you standing tall

iPosture keeps you standing tall

Sitting at the computer all day not only strains your eyes--it hurts your back. That's why Moacir Schnapp and his wife, Dr. Elma Schnapp, developed the iPosture, which is meant to remind you to sit up straight.

The device is rather small and can be worn on the skin with an adhesive patch, or clipped to a bra strap or shirt. It works by means of nanosensor technology. the microchip within the iPosture can actually monitor the angle of your upper chest and will vibrate when it detects a three degree change from your "ideal stance."

The iPosture will cost about $99.95, but it could be well worth it. The researchers say you may only need to wear the device four hours a day for two to four weeks, initially at least, to train your body into its new upright position.

[via Crave at CNET]...

Rat neuron-infused robot learns, avoids obstacles

Rat neuron-infused robot learns, avoids obstacles

A group of scientists at Reading University in the UK have developed a robot that is controlled by rat neurons. In case you're wondering why anyone would take rat brain cells and stuff them in a robot, the answer is simple: to learn more about the human brain, how it works and potentially make progress in the battle against degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

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Invisible material could make objects ‘disappear’

Invisible material could make objects ‘disappear’

The purported "invisibility cloak" has been in the news before. However, University of California at Berkley researchers are on the cusp of something big. They've developed a material "that can bend light around 3D objects" in effect, causing them to disappear.

Now, of course this material currently only exists on a nano scale. But these recent developments could potentially one day be scaled up to create great expanses of the material that could conceal objects and even people.

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