nanotechnology

First Millimeter Scale Computing System – Coming to an eye near you

First Millimeter Scale Computing System – Coming to an eye near you

The University of Michigan Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science has created a prototype for what is believed to be the first complete millimeter-scale computing system. The prototype is an implantable eye pressure monitor for glaucoma patients. The whole system measures just over 1 cubic millimeter, and has an ultra low-power microprocessor, a pressure sensor, memory, a thin-film battery, a solar cell, and a wireless radio with an antenna that can transfer data to an external device held near the eye.

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Nokia Research Centre Shows Off Stretchable Electronic Skin

Nokia Research Centre Shows Off Stretchable Electronic Skin

The Nokia Morph concept phone has been something that Nokia fans (and even non-Nokia fans) have been aching for. The ability to change your phone into something that you need, whenever you need it, just by molding it to a different form is an exciting idea. And it looks like, while Nokia has been pretty quiet about the Morph for awhile now, the company is still putting quite a bit of effort into getting that idea into the real world.

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Your Heartbeat Could Power Next-Generation Implants

Your Heartbeat Could Power Next-Generation Implants

Implants have been used for quite some time, and as the future becomes the present, the technology powering them gets better and better. One of the more troubling aspects of those gadgets, though, is powering them. After all, you can't have all those power cables we're so accustomed to in our day-to-day lives trailing out of your body, now can you? That's why how we power those implants needs to change with it, and get better at the same time. Thanks to scientists at Georgia Tech, we're now officially one step closer to seeing our own bodies power the implants that are so essential to some.

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Nanocoating Inspired by Moths Could Reduce Glare and Scratching on Glass

Nanocoating Inspired by Moths Could Reduce Glare and Scratching on Glass

While we love our AMOLED displays, we hate using them in direct sunlight. It's way too frustrating, because everything on the screen gets washed out, and we can no longer see what we're doing without tilting it all crazy-like, making people stare at us. So, consider us pretty happy that some scientists across the pond have created a new nanocoating that could get rid of our troubles for good.

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The Daily Slash: April 23rd 2010

The Daily Slash: April 23rd 2010

Welcome to Friday! You made it! Don't you feel proud of yourself? We're proud of you for making it through your long, arduous, and probably ridiculously busy work week, and landing squarely right here, with us, for this edition of the Daily Slash. Tonight, in the Best of R3, we've got a pre-order option for an Android-based tablet, the life expectancy of the iPad Camera Kit accessory, and another kind of Samsung Galaxy S. In the Dredge 'Net, the police are looking into the iPhone HD/4G debacle, there's a kitchen out there that might destroy you, and even more bad news for Palm.

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Graphene may be used for 1,000GHz chips

Graphene may be used for 1,000GHz chips

Graphene might be the next material of choice for making processor chips, according to an MIT report. In fact, Graphene, a substance discovered in 2004 that consists of pure carbon, could allow for faster speeds than ever thought possible.

The current research shows that a frequency multiplier could be created, which works to double a signal and likewise doubles a processor's clocking speed. Color me impressed! This idea is not new, but it is certainly new when applied to Graphene, which possesses only an atom's thickness.

So, what's so exciting about this? Well, Graphene chips could make for processors that run between 500GHz and 1,000GHz. That's quite a leap from the current 5GHz chips, wouldn't you say? We should see a commercial version of this technology within two years, according to MIT.

[via PC Pro]

Nanotechnology-infused material is completely water resistant

Nanotechnology-infused material is completely water resistant

Now this is pretty interesting. If nanotechnology news gives you the warm fuzzies then you'll be pleased to learn that some chemists at the University of Zurich have created a new fabric that can't ever get wet. Ever. I mean, it was in water for two months and it's still not wet!

This material is made from polyester which were covered with 40nm-wide silicone nanofilaments. Since these filaments are so tiny and so spiky, they make it so water actually sits above the material in a sort of pocket. This is a permanent state. The material won't ever be made wet.

So what are the potential applications of this technology? Well, it reduces drag in water by up to 20%, for one. It can also serve as a self-cleaning cloth. Regardless of how it ends up being used, this is still pretty cool and presents numerous opportunities.

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