MPAA

BitTorrent traffic on the downswing in the US for the first time

BitTorrent traffic on the downswing in the US for the first time

For the first time, BitTorrent traffic has declined in the United States, a trend that is said to be caused by more available legal alternatives, such as Netflix, Amazon Instant Prime, and similar streaming and digital-download services. On the flip side, torrenting has continued to increase in Europe, and the most likely reason is similar, if unfortunate -- there are less legal means of acquiring content, and so viewers seek illegal copies.

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Movie studios’ automated takedown requests target legitimate links

Movie studios’ automated takedown requests target legitimate links

In what may end up becoming a legendary moment of public embarrassment, several movie studios have issued DMCA takedown notices to Google for legitimate content, including official Facebook pages, Wikipedia entries, and legal copies of their own movies. This is the by-product of automated takedown requests submitted on behalf of the studios by YesItIs.org, which has since gone offline, indicating that perhaps the issue isn't as straight-forward as it seems.

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Leaked AT&T training documents reveal anti-piracy plan

Leaked AT&T training documents reveal anti-piracy plan

A leaked batch of AT&T training documents reveal an anti-piracy plan in the books, which includes sending warning notices to flagged accounts. In what seems to be a completely draconian measure, any subscriber who's account is flagged multiple times for copyright infringement will have access to frequently-visited websites (Facebook? YouTube?) blocked until they complete an online course on copyright. The warning notices will begin on November 28th.

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Google’s new search policy leaves free Internet advocates worried

Google’s new search policy leaves free Internet advocates worried

Yesterday, Google announced that it will begin using copyright takedown notices to influence where sites show up in search results. The general idea behind it is that if a site has a lot of takedown notices (made under DMCA), it risks being demoted in search rankings. Obviously, this new decision has won the hearts of copyright advocates like the MPAA and the RIAA, but it's making those who would keep the Internet free and open a little uneasy.

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MPAA: embedding an illegal video is copyright infringement

MPAA: embedding an illegal video is copyright infringement

You’re probably well aware of the MPAA and its crusade against movie piracy, but here's some of the latest shenanigans. ArsTechnica reports on the struggle between the MPAA and various internet bodies over whether or not embedding a video hosted by a third party can be considered copyright infringement. The MPAA believe that there shouldn’t be a legal distinction between hosting infringing content and embedding it, telling the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals that both should carry a risk of direct copyright infringement.

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MPAA doesn’t want Megaupload data transferred

MPAA doesn’t want Megaupload data transferred

Not long ago the hosting company based in Virginia where Megaupload stored the 25 PB of data customers have uploaded sought relief from the courts. While Megaupload and its founder Kim Dotcom had been battling in court, the hosting company claims it is spending $9000 a day to retain the massive amount of data. The hosting company, Carpathia, had previously sought to get the courts to offer it some relief from the massive costs until the court case was decided.

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South Park creators reveal MPAA corruption in plain english

South Park creators reveal MPAA corruption in plain english

The creators of the hit cartoon series South Park, Matt Stone and Trey Parker, did an interview at the Paley Center in which they revealed some shocking allegations of mis-deeds of the MPAA. This video is one of many in which these two fellows let loose on a variety of groups (as they're prone to do), but the MPAA clip has begun to gain significant traffic this week as the MPAA finds its name popping up in relation to the Megaupload saga as well as the soon to be released movie "Bully" which will be released without the MPAA's approval. Have a peek at what this pair of foul-mouthed miscreants has to say about how seemingly corrupt the MPAA appears to have gotten.

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MPAA may use retained Megaupload data for more suits

MPAA may use retained Megaupload data for more suits

The Motion Picture Association of America wants Megaupload's hosting service to retain a whopping 25 PB of customer data that is stored on its servers. It's allegedly costing the host, Carpathia based in Virginia, about $9000 each day to store the massive amount of user data. The MPAA's court filing shows that Hollywood may use that store data in suits of other organizations associated with Megaupload.

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