motion tracking

Swiss Horological Smartwatches tout MotionX activity tracking

Swiss Horological Smartwatches tout MotionX activity tracking

With Apple's entry into the smartwatch market, watch makers are finally taking note that the fledgling wearable isn't just a fad that's going away any time soon. At the same time, however, they have the unique problem of staying steadfast to their calling of making "true" watches. Some have dived head on with smartwatch models. Others are taking sort of middle road. And instead of doing things completely alone, some have grouped together to bring forth what will be collectively known as the Swiss Horological Smartwatches.

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Eye-tracking hits AAA gaming with Assassin’s Creed

Eye-tracking hits AAA gaming with Assassin’s Creed

This week the folks at SteelSeries have announced that their Tobii eye-tracking system will be used to track the eyes of gamers playing Assassin's Creed Rogue on the PC. Released last year for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 (at the same time as Assassin's Creed Unity, Assassin's Creed Rogue will employ eye-tracking technology to allow the user to work with an "infinite screen." Your view will center wherever your eyes do so gaze - left, right, up, down, or anywhere you peek in-between.

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Samsung EYECAN+ lets people control mice with their eyes

Samsung EYECAN+ lets people control mice with their eyes

It's quite encouraging that people are now pouring more attention into technologies that will empower those who otherwise cannot take advantage of all the fancy gadgets and software that this generation has at its disposal. After all, even people with disabilities might want to go online, use Facebook, or watch videos on YouTube. That is why efforts like Samsung's EYECAN+, actually in its second generation already, are welcome additions to the slowly growing number of accessibility products that bring these people and technology closer together.

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The irony: Microsoft makes depth-tracking phone while ignoring Kinect

The irony: Microsoft makes depth-tracking phone while ignoring Kinect

Microsoft may have conspicuously ignored Kinect in its Gamescon event today, going as far as to leave the motion sensor out of all three of its new Xbox One bundles, but that doesn't mean the rest of the company is giving up on clever camera tech. Microsoft Research has been working on turning a regular smartphone into a depth-camera, delivering Kinect and Google Project Tango style scanning and tracking but with a fraction of the complexity.

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Touch+ hands-on: Someone finally gets gesture control right

Touch+ hands-on: Someone finally gets gesture control right

Touchscreens work for tablets and phones, but getting your fingers involved with notebooks and PCs can be trickier, something Kickstarter success Ractiv believes it has fixed with its Touch+ motion tracking sensor bar. Eschewing the vague waving of Leap Motion, Touch+ takes a top-down approach by creating a virtual multitouch layer right on top of the keyboard. I caught up with the team behind the sensor to find out more on the path from crowdsourcing to shipping a commercial product now.

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Google’s self-driving car could lose its hat with new laser tech

Google’s self-driving car could lose its hat with new laser tech

Self-driving cars like Google's controversial 25mph autonomous pod could get significantly more affordable to make, researchers have promised, with a new LIDAR radar system far cheaper than the expensive turret on top of current models. The laser tracking system - the distinctive "turret" on top of the Google self-driving car - is one of the single most expensive components in the vehicle, estimated to add around $80,000 to the bill of materials. However, a Berkley team believes it could do the same thing at a fraction of the cost.

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Microsoft SurroundWeb reworks IllumiRoom for immersive web

Microsoft SurroundWeb reworks IllumiRoom for immersive web

Microsoft has given its IllumiRoom concept a makeover, with the immersive projected gaming experience evolving to deliver interactive web content that fills the living room and engages with Xbox One, Windows Phone, and Windows. Dubbed Microsoft SurroundWeb, the concept relies on the same approach of using projectors to cast digital graphics onto the surfaces of real-world objects, like the wall surrounding a TV or the coffee table in front of it, which then react to the user within that space.

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