mit

MIT construction uncovers time capsule intended for 2957 A.D.

MIT construction uncovers time capsule intended for 2957 A.D.

MIT made a fun announcement recently — during construction, a team happened across an object within the ground that looked out of place. Once it was removed, the institute’s Office of Environmental Health and Safety evaluated the item and declared it safe, revealing what it is to the public: a time capsule from the mid-50s that isn’t supposed to be opened until the year 2957. Unlike some time capsules buried during that time period, this one was well constructed and held up very well over the decades.

Continue Reading

MIT creates self-transforming fashion dubbed bioLogic

MIT creates self-transforming fashion dubbed bioLogic

Scientists at MIT have teamed up with New Balance to weave a new discovery into sportswear. The new discovery has to do with the expansion and contraction of natto cells relative to atmospheric moisture. Natto is a bacteria officially called Bacillus Subtilis natto and is a microorganism that lives inside dry rice stalks.

Continue Reading

MIT researchers develop software that identifies people through walls via WiFi

MIT researchers develop software that identifies people through walls via WiFi

It seems like there's no limit to what we can do with WiFi these days, from syncing health data from a watch to our smartphones, to pressing a physical button to order more coffee. But now MIT researchers have found a way to use it to identify people, but not necessarily with the internet itself. Instead they've developed software that can detect people's silhouettes through walls based on variations in WiFi signal.

Continue Reading

Soft robotic hands no longer crush your objects

Soft robotic hands no longer crush your objects

Researchers at MIT have created a robot with the ability to identify the objects it picks up - at least their dimensions - by touch. This robot is working at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and utilizes a 3D-printed hand made with silicone rubber. Each of this robot's three fingers has sensors that, working together, are able to estimate the size and shape of an object. This system is accurate enough to allow the robot to identify objects from a set.

Continue Reading

MIT’s MultiFab 3D printer can handle 10 materials at once

MIT’s MultiFab 3D printer can handle 10 materials at once

3D printers are great, useful, and fun, but the typical hobbyist printer that you can buy for yourself or for your home business has a problem with single-mindedness. For one, it can only really produce one part at a time, leaving the task of assembling parts together into a functional whole to humans. For another, it can only work with one material at a time, though more professional, and more expensive, 3D printers can work with up to three. MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory or CSAIL, however, has a solution that solves both of those at a fraction of the cost of a professional 3D printer.

Continue Reading

Glass 3D printing method unveiled by MIT

Glass 3D printing method unveiled by MIT

3D printing has come a long way in the last few years with printers getting cheaper and printing materials becoming easier to work with. Typically, a 3D printer works with plastics of some sort for creating objects that the user wants to build. Researchers at MIT have created a new 3D printing process that uses glass for the print material, the process is called G3DP.

Continue Reading

These batteries could last forever

These batteries could last forever

This week researchers at MIT and Samsung have revealed a new approach to batteries, paving the way for "rechargeable batteries with almost indefinite lifetimes." MIT suggests that the electrolyte is the key to this next-generation solution to longer-lasting batteries is in a solid electrolyte instead of liquid, liquid being the element used in most common rechargeable batteries today. This new solution could also make the next generation of batteries safer, too, reducing the chance of explosions and harmful chemical leaks.

Continue Reading

MIT shows off trio of robots that work together to deliver meds and drinks

MIT shows off trio of robots that work together to deliver meds and drinks

One of the places that robots will eventually find themselves working is in the medical setting. There are shortages of qualified medical professionals around the world and that shortage leaves staff overworked at times. MIT researchers are showing off three robots that are designed to work closely together to get tasks done ranging from delivering medications to getting people drinks when they need them.

Continue Reading

Yolk-and-shell nanoparticle could boost capacity in lithium-ion batteries

Yolk-and-shell nanoparticle could boost capacity in lithium-ion batteries

The technology world is ever changing and one of the fastest changing parts of the tech world are screen resolutions. It seems every time we look up resolutions are getting higher. One important aspect of the tech world for products of all types that hasn't evolved as fast as consumers would like is battery life. A new nanoparticle called the yolk-and-shell nanoparticle could usher in a new era of lithium-ion batteries.

Continue Reading

Bouncing tactical camera lets police peer safely into dangerous rooms

Bouncing tactical camera lets police peer safely into dangerous rooms

First responders and law enforcement officers often encounter dangerous obstacles on the job. They can't see through walls, but a new bouncing camera can be thrown into a dangerous situation to give officers a clear understanding of where any hostages or gunmen are located.The "tactical spheres" house a six-lensed camera that can record surroundings and stitch them into a single photo which is then sent to a responding officer's smartphone. The ball is also equipped with temperatures and carbon monoxide sensors.

Continue Reading

Tiny self-folding origami robot walks, swims, and then dissolves

Tiny self-folding origami robot walks, swims, and then dissolves

MIT researchers are at it again. This time, a joint research team with TU Munich has developed a self-folding origami robot capable of a range of tasks. The robot can even self-destruct after it completes its mission. The tiny device starts completely flat, and is made from ultra-thin laser-cut polystyrene layers that sandwich a magnet and PVC. The self-folding process is instigated by placing the tiny machine over a heating element. The PVC then contracts along the laser-cut lines, creating folds. The robot weighs only 0.31g and is 1.7cm long, laid flat. It can "walk" at a top speed of 4 cm per second.

Continue Reading

MIT’s latest robot cheetah can jump higher than you

MIT’s latest robot cheetah can jump higher than you

MIT's Biomimetics Robotics Lab has created a new version of its robotic cheetah. The Cheetah 2 is capable of even more animal-like actions than DARPA's faster and simpler predecessor. The Cheetah 2 can reliably identify and jump over objects up to 40 cm (about 15 inches) high. When it jumps, it mimics the movements of an actual cheetah, creating a double arc as its fore and high legs clear the hurdle.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5