mit

MIT recycles old car batteries into cheap, long-lasting solar panels

MIT recycles old car batteries into cheap, long-lasting solar panels

Lead pollution is a serious issue, particularly when looked at from the perspective of thousands of old car batteries that are increasingly unneeded due to changes in the battery technologies used. Researchers at MIT have developed a new way to recycle these batteries, and rather than creating them into new car batteries, they've figured out how to make them into very efficient solar panels.

Continue Reading

Algorithm extracts audio from silent video using vibrations

Algorithm extracts audio from silent video using vibrations

It feels almost like a scene straight out of a spy movie or crime procedural show. You only have a video a of man talking with his back to the camera. No audio to tell you clearly what he's saying and there are no lips to read to give you a clue. But by observing just the movement of the leaves of a plant nearby, you are able to reconstruct what the man is saying, stop his evil plot, defeat the bad guy, and save the day.

Continue Reading

Rim light photography? Not a problem for this drone

Rim light photography? Not a problem for this drone

Soon, professional photographers might have a use for these fancy personal drones that are becoming popular among hobbyists today. A joint research group from MIT and Cornell University are developing a kind of drone that will assist photographers by providing them with the perfect light, even in the most difficult requirements, like rim light.

Continue Reading

Learn a language by…eating a pill?

Learn a language by…eating a pill?

The task of learning a language has never been simple, despite efforts to make it so. Hundreds of programs, methods, and pseudoscience applications have cropped up over the course of spoken existence aiming to simplify the acquisition of the skill, but few have succeeded. MIT Media Lab's founder Nicholas Negroponte is confident that will change in the future, however, and how he anticipates we'll acquire new languages is very unique.

Continue Reading

Soofa bench charges your phone as you bask in the sun

Soofa bench charges your phone as you bask in the sun

It a great and sunny day and you decide to head outdoors for some alone time with your tablet or phone. But alas, in just a few short hours your device's battery gives you its dying cry. Time to head home and plug in? That might no longer be necessary if Soofa's solar-powered benches become a public fixture just like, well, non solar-powered benches.

Continue Reading

Ford, MIT and Stanford band together to further the cause of automated driving research

Ford, MIT and Stanford band together to further the cause of automated driving research

In order to reach automobile utopia of the future, Ford needs to lay the foundations of that dream today. That is why the car maker has chosen to join forces with the brightest minds from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University to help it achieve its goal of making tomorrow's roads safer and more efficient with cars that have eyes, ears, and even a dash of common sense.

Continue Reading

MIT shows off transparent display that could lead to next-gen HUDs

MIT shows off transparent display that could lead to next-gen HUDs

There are a lot of technologies being investigated around the world to help reduce driver distraction and bring a new level of interactivity to infotainment systems in cars. One of those technologies is the heads up display. A group of researchers from MIT has created a new type of transparent data display system that could lead to next generation HUDs that are cheaper and easy to manufacture.

Continue Reading

MIT researchers create 3D motion tracking system that sees through walls

MIT researchers create 3D motion tracking system that sees through walls

Researchers at MIT have created a new way to track movement through walls, and it is even more accurate and revealing than the motion tracking technology they created in June of this year. It's called WiTrack, and it can sense a person's movements in three dimensions -- physical occlusions or no. It's an update to the same researchers' "WiVi", which could "see" through walls but wasn't nearly as comprehensive as this.

Continue Reading

1 2 3