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MIT’s latest robot cheetah can jump higher than you

MIT’s latest robot cheetah can jump higher than you

MIT's Biomimetics Robotics Lab has created a new version of its robotic cheetah. The Cheetah 2 is capable of even more animal-like actions than DARPA's faster and simpler predecessor. The Cheetah 2 can reliably identify and jump over objects up to 40 cm (about 15 inches) high. When it jumps, it mimics the movements of an actual cheetah, creating a double arc as its fore and high legs clear the hurdle.

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MIT reseachers remove unwanted reflections from photos

MIT reseachers remove unwanted reflections from photos

Taking photographs through a window can be a mess. Anything behind the camera could be reflected, infiltrating the photograph. It can be difficult to see the intended image due to the photographer's own reflection obscuring the image. In the fictional, TV world of CSI, you could just say, "enhance!" But, until now, it hasn't been so easy to erase photographed reflections in the real world. Thankfully, a group of MIT researchers have figured out a complicated algorithm which can remove undesired reflections from photographs.

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MIT’s NailO puts a tiny trackpad on your fingernail

MIT’s NailO puts a tiny trackpad on your fingernail

MIT has a new invention that, upon first glance, looks like a poorly positioned fake thumbnail. The reason is that it is tiny trackpad designed to be mounted on your fingernail, lending perhaps the best yet remote control of your tablet or smartphone. It's one of the more innovative and unusual wearables we've seen in recent months, and though it is odd to behold at first, there are some valid uses for it. Those with certain disabilities might find it convenient, for example, as well as those who want covert control of their phone.

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MIT researchers design a chair that can assemble itself

MIT researchers design a chair that can assemble itself

If you have ever purchased cheap furniture that you have to assemble at home, you know what an arduous processes building a table or cabinet can be. Researchers at MIT have designed some high tech furniture, albeit on a small scale, that can assemble itself. The prototype is a chair that can put itself together under controlled circumstances.

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Mars One mission could fail terribly, says MIT students

Mars One mission could fail terribly, says MIT students

The world's interest in sending people to Mars has never been higher, and for good reason: it is cited as both a necessity for the human race, and the technology to pull it off is advancing quickly. Multiple entities are looking into sending people to the Red Planet, perhaps the most notable being Mars One, which is looking to send a group of astronauts on a one-way trip. Unfortunately, as exciting as the prospects are, a group of MIT students says the mission is doomed, and that with the current plan the astronauts would starve.

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MIT develops pill coated with tiny needles to replace shots

MIT develops pill coated with tiny needles to replace shots

Shots are strange things -- though small in the grand scheme of life and injuries, some of the most hardened folks among us turn jelly-knee'd at the sight of them. Perhaps there is some instinctual association between needles and poisonous stingers. Regardless, MIT has developed a potential solution, and it doesn't sound much more comforting: a pill with micro needles.

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MIT recycles old car batteries into cheap, long-lasting solar panels

MIT recycles old car batteries into cheap, long-lasting solar panels

Lead pollution is a serious issue, particularly when looked at from the perspective of thousands of old car batteries that are increasingly unneeded due to changes in the battery technologies used. Researchers at MIT have developed a new way to recycle these batteries, and rather than creating them into new car batteries, they've figured out how to make them into very efficient solar panels.

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Algorithm extracts audio from silent video using vibrations

Algorithm extracts audio from silent video using vibrations

It feels almost like a scene straight out of a spy movie or crime procedural show. You only have a video a of man talking with his back to the camera. No audio to tell you clearly what he's saying and there are no lips to read to give you a clue. But by observing just the movement of the leaves of a plant nearby, you are able to reconstruct what the man is saying, stop his evil plot, defeat the bad guy, and save the day.

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Rim light photography? Not a problem for this drone

Rim light photography? Not a problem for this drone

Soon, professional photographers might have a use for these fancy personal drones that are becoming popular among hobbyists today. A joint research group from MIT and Cornell University are developing a kind of drone that will assist photographers by providing them with the perfect light, even in the most difficult requirements, like rim light.

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Learn a language by…eating a pill?

Learn a language by…eating a pill?

The task of learning a language has never been simple, despite efforts to make it so. Hundreds of programs, methods, and pseudoscience applications have cropped up over the course of spoken existence aiming to simplify the acquisition of the skill, but few have succeeded. MIT Media Lab's founder Nicholas Negroponte is confident that will change in the future, however, and how he anticipates we'll acquire new languages is very unique.

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