memory

Elecom Class-6 SDHC is waterproof

Elecom Class-6 SDHC is waterproof

We’ve seen plenty of flash storage based electronics devices with waterproof feature, hardly the storage itself. The Japanese looks to break the trend with the introduction of waterproof SDHC memory cards. A SDHC card is more likely to float if it’s accidentally dropped in the water but the Elecom-made SDHC is more than H20-friendly; as a IPX7 compliant device, it will withstand accidental immersion in one meter of water for up to 30 minutes.

Besides waterproof; the Elecom is Class-6 standard, meaning it offers real-time recording directly to the card with a guaranteed minimum write speed of 6MB/sec and a data transfer rate of up to 15MB/sec.

Elecom waterproof SDHC is available in 4GB and 8GB capacity. Mum’s the word on pricing information but it is slated to ship in December.

Hynix 7GHz GDDR 5 Video RAM

Hynix 7GHz GDDR 5 Video RAM

Memory manufacturer Hynix have announced the world's first high-speed GDDR 5 RAM capable of running at 7GHz.  The video memory is over a third faster than existing 4.5GHz video RAM, and will initially be available in 54nm 1Gb chips.  It's capable of processing up to 28 gigabytes of data per second.

 

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Everspin 16MB non-volatile MRAM coming 2009

Everspin 16MB non-volatile MRAM coming 2009

Everspin intend to launch 16MB MRAM chips in 2009, with densities to compete with DRAM and FLASH (NOR) by 2015.  The company, which split off from Freescale to develop the non-volatile memory, is currently the only to have commercially-available MRAM products on the market, in the shape of a 4-bit chip.  It has also just announced byte-wide 1MB and 4MB chips.

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Kangaru e-Flash dual eSATA & USB 2.0 32GB flash drive

Kangaru e-Flash dual eSATA & USB 2.0 32GB flash drive

Kangaru Solutions have announced what they're claiming is the first ever eSATA flash drive.  The double-ended e-Flash drive has a USB 2.0 connector on one side and an eSATA connector on the other, offering users either the paltry 480MB/s of dull old USB or the blistering 3Gb/s of everyone's favorite external SATA interface.  Of course, those are just theoretical speeds: when you dig into the spec sheet you see the e-Flash is slightly less impressive than the headlines might suggest.

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Apple MacBook & MacBook Pro both support 6GB of RAM

Apple MacBook & MacBook Pro both support 6GB of RAM

Memory company Ramjet are advertizing an upgrade kit for the new MacBook and MacBook Pro that would give each notebook 6GB of RAM in total.  The amount - which is 2GB higher than the figure Apple themselves claim is supported - is comprised of a 2GB DDR3 chip and a 4GB DDR3 chip.  Unlike with 8GB, which the NVIDIA chipsets used should officially support but, as those have tried it have discovered, leads to system instabilities, 6GB seems to be a balance between performance and playing happily with OS X's current limitations.

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Kingston HyperX DDR3 Triple-Channel Memory launches

Kingston HyperX DDR3 Triple-Channel Memory launches

Kingston announced yesterday their HyperX DDR3 Triple-Channel Memory that was designed with the Intel X58 motherboards in mind. They also meet the 1.65 volt platform recommendation for Core i7.

This new product features 2GHz memory and are available in kits of three 1GB modules. They will also be Intel XMP or Extreme Memory Profile ready. These are the fastest triple-channel memory DDR3 products available right now.

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Sharp LCD Panel gets memory

Sharp LCD Panel gets memory

Sharp recently showed off a new LC panel that's outfitted with memory, so that even if it loses its power source, it will still keeps the last displayed content on. The new panel was exhibited at FPD International 2008, and from the looks of it, has made quite a splash.

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Apple MacBook 3rd-party RAM causing instabilities?

Apple MacBook 3rd-party RAM causing instabilities?

Some new MacBook users are reporting problems when attempting to upgrade their Apple laptops with third-party RAM.  The new, aluminum MacBook can support up to 4GB of 1066MHz DDR3 SDRAM, with the standard configuration being a pair of single 1GB chips.  In replacing those with third-party memory - including seemingly-identical spec chips from big-name brands such as Crucial - some owners have found their MacBooks suddenly prone to crashing.

 

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