Megaupload

Kim Dotcom announces third file storage service as nonprofit

Kim Dotcom announces third file storage service as nonprofit

Kim Dotcom, the well-known internet entrepreneur behind file hosting sites MegaUpload, and its successor Mega, has announced he's planning to launch a third file storage service, but this time as a non-profit. This comes after last week's news that Dotcom is not involved with Mega any longer, following a "hostile takeover by a Chinese investor," as he phrased it. While Mega has denied the accusation, Dotcom went on to publicly state that he lost faith in the site's security and privacy, and users' data was no longer safe.

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Department of Justice report details case against Kim Dotcom, former Megaupload leaders

Department of Justice report details case against Kim Dotcom, former Megaupload leaders

Kim Dotcom, the man behind Mega, the successor of the now-defunct Megaupload, has been the subject of a long-lived investigation, the details of which were revealed today in a 191-page report by the Department of Justice. The seven defendants in the case, among them being Dotcom, are currently located in New Zealand, and have been hit with many charges, including copyright infringement.

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Kim Dotcom ditches Mega to focus on music project and more

Kim Dotcom ditches Mega to focus on music project and more

Kim Dotcom has announced he is stepping down as director of the new file sharing service he launched called Mega. We've talked plenty about Kim Dotcom, the man who headed up Megaupload and found himself under serious legal assault by the United States over alleged copyright infringement. While Dotcom was fighting US authorities and trying to stave off being extradited to the United States along with other executives from his company, he has been working on launching new online services including Mega.

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Megaupload loses petabytes of data as Euro host pulls plug

Megaupload loses petabytes of data as Euro host pulls plug

Petabytes of Megaupload data trapped on one hosting company's server has been deleted without warning, outspoken founder Kim Dotcom has revealed, meaning a huge number of predominantly European users have likely seen the end of their content. Leaseweb, one of several server providers Megaupload paid to store files, wiped 690 servers Dotcom told TorrentFreak, giving no notice to Dotcom's legal team or, indeed, the US court still tussling over what should be done with user data.

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FBI ordered to return confiscated hard drives to Kim Dotcom

FBI ordered to return confiscated hard drives to Kim Dotcom

It's been quite the journey for Mega founder Kim Dotcom, but it seems like things are slowly coming to a conclusion. The High Court of New Zealand has ordered the FBI to return confiscated hard drives that were taken from Dotcom's home when it was initially raided last year. They have also ordered the US government to destroy all copies that they might have archived.

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Kim Dotcom can sue the New Zealand GCSB says courts

Kim Dotcom can sue the New Zealand GCSB says courts

A new wrinkle has been unveiled in the legal saga of Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom and his battle against extradition to the United States. Dotcom and other members of the Megaupload team stand accused of copyright infringement among other things and face huge fines and prison time. A court in the Zealand ruled this week that Dotcom can file suit against the New Zealand spy agency.

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Mega now accepts Bitcoin as payment, also hints at e-mail, chat, voice expansion

Mega now accepts Bitcoin as payment, also hints at e-mail, chat, voice expansion

Kim Dotcom has just announced through Twitter that Mega, his successor to Megaupload, will now be accepting Bitcoin as payment for its cloud storage services. You can purchase your Mega service with Bitcoin through Mega's newest reseller, Bitvoucher. Bitcoin is a P2P digital currency that allows you to instantly make a payment to anyone, anywhere in the world. It does not operate under a central authority, such as banks or the government, but instead is operated by only the Bitcoin network. This allows everyone to be able to use its services, and it also allows users to make payments that cannot be traced by the government.


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Mega search engine listings appear as files get the axe

Mega search engine listings appear as files get the axe

Kim Dotcom's Mega is off to a high-profile start, but today we're hearing of seemingly inevitable copyright woes for the site. Mega has only been officially up and running for 11 days, but according to ComputerWorld, the website has already received 150 copyright warnings for 250 files. Since Mega lacks a search function and requires users to share links in order to share content (which is encrypted when uploaded), how are these copyright holders finding their content on Mega?

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Kim Dotcom: Mega will “take encryption to the mainstream”

Kim Dotcom: Mega will “take encryption to the mainstream”

This week the next-generation iteration of online file hosting known as Mega has taken hold, its creator Kim Dotcom making it clear in an interview that this is no Megaupload, his goal being to usher in a new era for the web. This interview took place with the Wall Street Journal and included no lack of assurances from Dotcom that this web service would not end up like the last. Singing some of the same tunes as he did this past weekend at the official launch of the service from his own New Zealand mansion, Dotcom made clear: "Every single pixel on that site has been looked at by lawyers, and of course we are fully compliant with all laws."

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