medical

Cloud DX: First working tricorder prototype for XPrize revealed

Cloud DX: First working tricorder prototype for XPrize revealed

If you hate getting poked and prodded for a medical exam, you're not alone. I've always been envious of the crew on Star Trek; they made it look so easy as Dr. Crusher waved a tricorder over her patients for an instantaneous exam. The tricorder is like a medical diagnostic magic wand; it was assumed to be fictional, until now. The Cloud DX is the first prototype to be revealed for the Tricorder XPrize competition. The device is designed to diagnose 15 different medical conditions and can monitor vital signs for 72 hours.

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Bioprinter 3D-prints living cartilage nose in 16 minutes

Bioprinter 3D-prints living cartilage nose in 16 minutes

While traditional 3D-printers build objects using layers of plastic, we've seem some great strides in 3D-printing like lattices emerging from amorphous, resinous goo. Now bioprinters are entering the ring with their ability to create 3D models from biological materials. There's no need to wait for an ear to grow on the back of a mouse; this bioprinter from the ETH Zurich Cartilage Engineering and Regeneration Group can print a nose from biopolymers and living cartilage cells in only 16 minutes. Best of all, no mice are harmed in the process!

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Premera Blue Cross breached by hackers

Premera Blue Cross breached by hackers

Hackers have found their way into servers that contained medical information on subscribers to health insurance provider Premera Blue Cross. The health insurance company announced this week that it had been the victim of a cyberattack that could have exposed medical data and financial details on its subscribers. As many as 11 million people could be affected by the breach.

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New Narbis neurofeedback glasses force you to concentrate

New Narbis neurofeedback glasses force you to concentrate

It's so easy to get distracted these days when we really need to focus. A new set of glasses may hold the key to honing your concentration. These glasses aren't prescription strength; they actually darken when you become unfocused which trains your brain to concentrate so the lenses stay clear. Perhaps calling them glasses is a bit of a misnomer. It's actually the Narbis wearable neurofeedback device. Narbis is hoping to take the focus-improving science of neurofeedback out of a clinical setting and bring it to everyone through Kickstarter.

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23andMe plans to make drugs based on customer data

23andMe plans to make drugs based on customer data

23andMe has had a somewhat rocky existence, first offering data on one's own ancestry and genetic data, then stripping that down to only ancestry information coupled with raw data that coupld be parsed for medical reasons by third-party companies. That was due to meddling by the FDA. That was recently changed with genetic test kit approval (though conditions apply), and now the company has made a very big announcement: it is planning to use customer data to make pharmaceutical drugs.

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Heart-on-a-chip tests drugs’ cardiotoxicity with its real heartbeat

Heart-on-a-chip tests drugs’ cardiotoxicity with its real heartbeat

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans. Recently the bio-tech industry has been exploding with cardiac research like last week's heart attack preventing nanobots. New research by the team at the University of California, Berkley has created working human heart cells on a tiny chip designed to test the efficacy of new drugs in clinical trials. This heart-on-a-chip is officially known as a cardiac microphysiological system, or MPS. Using this heart-on-a-chip, scientists can measure the potential cardiac damage of a drug before it reaches expensive human trials.

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MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

Organ transplant lists are notoriously long. Sometimes a patient in need has to wait years to receive a transplant, if they are lucky enough to receive one at all. The most successful transplants come from living donors, but a faithful friend isn't always a medical match to her friend in need. Enter MatchGrid, a biomedical program designed to match potential kidney donors and recipients. MatchGrid was created by former WIRED editor and kidney recipient David Jacobs. His program established a method to match twelve people and create a six-way kidney transplant chain.

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Targeted nano-particles can now prevent heart attacks

Targeted nano-particles can now prevent heart attacks

Soon it may be possible to prevent heart attacks by an injection of nano-particles into the bloodstream, according to the newest research paper from the scientists at Columbia University Medical Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America. A large part of that is atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. This occurs as plaques build up along the inside of the arterial wall. The research team created targeted nano-particles designed to heal atherosclerosis. This is the latest discovery in a growing field of pint-sized medical discoveries. We've seen robots that can swim inside your eyeball and smart pills, but nothing as small as this nano-treatment.

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Gerbils replace rats as historical plague spreaders

Gerbils replace rats as historical plague spreaders

It would appear that our hatred of rats for the past several hundred years may be due to a bit of mistaken identity. Scientists this week have published a paper which suggests that it wasn't so much rats that spread the bubonic plague across the planet, but gerbils. Your best buddy, the gerbil - the one you've got in a plastic tube cage sitting in your living room right now. He may have been guilty this whole time! All these hundreds of years, keeping silent for his ancestors, the real-deal spreaders of plague.

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23andme wins FDA approval for genetic test kit

23andme wins FDA approval for genetic test kit

You might recognize the name 23andMe as the company that sold home genetic testing kits. Back in 2013, 23andme was all but shut down by the FDA when the FDA ruled that the company could no longer sell its genetic testing kits. In a big turnaround, the FDA has now granted approval to 23andme to sell a home genetic test kit for one specific rare genetic disease.

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CliniCloud brings connected healthcare with stethoscope, thermometer

CliniCloud brings connected healthcare with stethoscope, thermometer

The ‘Internet of Things’ is bringing a lot of cool stuff that isn’t smartphones or tablets. Much of it has to do with your home, with several good DIY home security kits making a splash in their own way. Another avenue for connected success comes via medical equipment for the home, where devices connected to your phone (and an app) promise a better view of your health statistics. We’re seeing this come to light with Wishbone’s contactless thermometer, but a new pair of devices from CliniCloud want to push it a step further.

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This bra claims to detect cancer better than a mammogram

This bra claims to detect cancer better than a mammogram

We've seen some rather unusual lingerie before, like one that has a built-in heart sensor and some that light up in rather questionable circumstances. Cyrcadia Health is making yet another one, but this time it has a more serious tone. The iTbra is a "smart" bra that women can wear to take the place of a mammogram test or monthly tests. The bra is fitted with sensors which communicate with a doctor's or a user's mobile device, making cancer detection quicker and less awkward.

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