medical

Researchers develop Dr Who inspired sonic screwdriver

Researchers develop Dr Who inspired sonic screwdriver

The Sonic Screwdriver. It’s a curious tool that seems to work miracles for the Doctor and his companions. Want to open a door? No problem. Fix some kind of alien technology in a couple of second? Piece of cake. While it doesn’t quite have the range of skills as the fictional version, researchers have created their own version of the sonic screwdriver that could help in certain surgeries.

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Stem Cells vs Open Source: The 2012 Millennium Tech Award

Stem Cells vs Open Source: The 2012 Millennium Tech Award

It's no secret that this year's candidates for the Millennium Technology Prize are set to be controversial outside scientific circles. On the other hand, the prize committee at the Technology Academy Finland are quite sure of themselves: Linus Torvalds and Dr Shinya Yamanaka are this year's laureates. The prize this year for this prestigious award will exceed a a lovely 1 million Euros - certainly a pot to be sought after.

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Face transplant recipient recovering well post surgery

Face transplant recipient recovering well post surgery

An American man named Richard Lee Norris has lived as a recluse for the last 15 years after suffering devastating facial injuries after a gun accident. The devastating injuries left Norris without lips and most of his nose and with very limited movement of his mouth. His facial transplant was the most extensive ever performed included giving the man new teeth, nose, tongue, and a new jaw.

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Fortinet sees future where computer virus and biological virus combine

Fortinet sees future where computer virus and biological virus combine

What we know today as a "computer virus" might eventually evolve into the point where it's able to affect human biology. And no, we're not talking about a forgettable 1999 Jamie Lee Curtis flick. In one of those cases where science fiction could turn into fiction, researchers legitimately see a future where someone who's able to make a computer virus today is able to make a biological weapon tomorrow.

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Nintendo Wii Remote can help diagnose ocular torticollis

Nintendo Wii Remote can help diagnose ocular torticollis

Who knows what scientists at the Seoul National University College of Medicine were thinking when they decided to use Wii technology to help diagnose an eye disorder? Called ocular torticollis, patients end up tilting their head to one side to compensate for inefficiencies in one of their eyes. A well established method already exists for a diagnosis test, but researchers decided to try it with a couple Wii Remotes pointed at the subject, and Bluetooth connectivity to track movement.

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Neuroscientists say computers can reverse schizophrenia

Neuroscientists say computers can reverse schizophrenia

One of the most fascinating subjects in all of medical science is neuroscience. The study of the brain has made a lot of advancements throughout the years, especially with the help of increasingly sophisticated computer research. One of the area of most interest is in mental illness, where there is still a flurry of questions about what the best treatment is, if it's curable, and how to approach patients with various diseases. Today, computers are part of that.

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BrailleTouch app brings blind typing to the touchscreen

BrailleTouch app brings blind typing to the touchscreen

In an app coming to the market relatively soon for both iPhone and Android, Georgia Tech researchers have reduced the price of realistically typing Braille on a smartphone from $1700 plus the cost of the phone to essentially free. The $1700 is a basic figure which spoken by Post Doctorate Fellow Mario Romero of the School of Interactive Computing working on the project and mentioning how much a smartphone-connected Braille keyboard costs on average. What the app BrailleTouch will be doing is offering the same functionality with a set of simple gestures and 6 buttons on-screen that allow for accurate and simple typing of Braille characters.

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Remote-controlled medication delivery via chip implant

Remote-controlled medication delivery via chip implant

The field of medical implants hit a new milestone today with the successful implementation of remote-controlled chips that can be implanted and programmed to release medication. With this type of implementation, the idea is that doctors will be able to monitor and moderate dosage remotely with a push of a button.

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European researchers use 3D-printed jaw in successful human surgery

European researchers use 3D-printed jaw in successful human surgery

Instead of traditional reconstructive surgery, an 83-year-old patient was outfitted with a new jaw that came not from another human body but from a 3D printer. Doctors had decided it was too risky to perform the more common form of surgery because of the patient's age and fraile condition. And believe it or not, it appears to have been a resounding success.

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