medical

Mitochondrial Replacement “three-parent IVF” set for UK go-ahead

Mitochondrial Replacement “three-parent IVF” set for UK go-ahead

Artificially inseminated babies created from the genes of three people could be a reality as early as 2014, with the UK the first to approve so-called mitochondria replacement to prevent inheritable diseases. The controversial procedure involves transferring the genetic material from two parents into an egg from another woman; by removing the donor egg's nucleus, and replacing it with the parents' nucleus, the risk of inherited defects that could have otherwise been passed down to the baby is removed. However, the fact that the child will have DNA from three parents, not two - albeit only around 0.1-percent from the woman who donated the egg - has some genetic modification opponents angry, given IVF embryos are destroyed in the process.

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MindWalker brain-controlled exoskeleton puts the paralyzed on their feet

MindWalker brain-controlled exoskeleton puts the paralyzed on their feet

An eight week EC trial of a brain-controlled exoskeleton potentially promising newfound mobility to those with lower-limb paralysis will finish this week, with the project expected to spark a five year development path to a commercial version. The device, dubbed MindWalker, is the handiwork of a seven partner team coordinated by Space Applications Services, which has been working for the past three years on a motorized exoskeleton that can be controlled and navigated via brain impulses. Now, New Scientist reports, the European Commission will assess the results, having funded the project so far.

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Scanadu Scout “Medical Tricorder” crowdsources testing for FDA

Scanadu Scout “Medical Tricorder” crowdsources testing for FDA

Real-life tricorder project, the Scanado Scout, has graduated to crowdfunding stage, with the DIY health monitoring tool looking to raise $100,000 and ship to backers by March 2014. The project, by startup Scanado, aims to turn a smartphone into a health tracking device - or "an Emergency Room in your pocket" - with a compact vital-sign reading puck that wirelessly communicates via low-power Bluetooth.

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Doctors say Tetris could fix lazy eye

Doctors say Tetris could fix lazy eye

The condition commonly known as lazy eye has an official medical name, amblyopia. However, most people know what lazy eye is, it's a medical condition where one eye doesn't move in the same manner as the other, and it can lead to vision loss. Canadian doctors believe they found a new way to treat lazy eye and it involves playing the video game Tetris.

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Better’s iPhone app is a doctor in your pocket

Better’s iPhone app is a doctor in your pocket

Everyone has had their moments of medical uncertainty, being bitten by an unknown insect and forming a rash, having a funny feeling you've never had before, or perhaps more serious symptoms that happen at a time when a trip to the hospital is impossible or inconvenient. Soon, you'll be able to say, "There's an app for that," with Better announcing an iPhone app at AllThingsD's D: Dive Into Mobile.

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Patient has 75% of skull replaced with 3D-printed implant

Patient has 75% of skull replaced with 3D-printed implant

Earlier this week, a surgical procedure saw the first-ever patient to receive a partial skull transplant using 3D-printed materials. A whopping 75% of the man's skill was replaced with the polyetherketoneketone material. However, it's not said what part of the skull was replaced, nor if the 75% accounts for just the top of head.

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FDA approves artificial retina for the blind

FDA approves artificial retina for the blind

The FDA approved a new technology this week that promises to give limited vision to people who are blind. The technology the FDA has approved is called the artificial retina. It allows people with certain types of blindness to be able to detect crosswalks, people, cars, and some can detect large letters or numbers.

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Harvard geneticist says a Neanderthal can be cloned with the aid of an adventurous woman

Harvard geneticist says a Neanderthal can be cloned with the aid of an adventurous woman

A Harvard geneticist named George Church had some interesting things to say during an interview with the German paper Der Spiegel, during which he discussed the cloning of a Neanderthal baby. Among other things, one of the big requirements for such a project is the willingness of a woman to be a surrogate for the child, a scenario that seems straight out of a Hollywood movie.

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