medical

Playing Candy Crush Saga non-stop for 8 weeks ruptures man’s thumb tendon

Playing Candy Crush Saga non-stop for 8 weeks ruptures man’s thumb tendon

BlackBerry users from days of yore may remember the condition that was jokingly dubbed BlackBerry thumb — that is, a repetitive strain injury caused by tapping the device's buttons over and over again for long periods of time. Well, that condition can develop from any repetitive thumb use, and as this story reveals, one modern candidate may be the smartphone game Candy Crush Saga. Addiction to the free-to-play Candy Crush games isn't new, but this California man's playing was so excessive, he didn't even notice the pain leading up to a thumb tendon rupture.

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Apple makes ResearchKit available to Devs and researchers

Apple makes ResearchKit available to Devs and researchers

ResearchKit has the capacity to truly change things. Today, Apple is letting Developers and researchers realize its promise, and has opened ResearchKit up to anyone who wants to contribute. Developers are now free to develop apps that utilize the framework, and researchers can begin new studies to aide in ramping up their studies. Announced at Apple’s March event, ResearchKit uses an iPhone as a diagnostic tool when users opt-in to providing data. On launch, Apple and a few select partners had medical studies relating to Breast Cancer, Parkinson’s Disease, Asthma, and Cardiovascular Disease.

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White House details plan to fight drug-resistant bacteria

White House details plan to fight drug-resistant bacteria

Drug-resistant bacteria is a serious problem, causing thousands of deaths in the US (and even more elsewhere) and millions of hard-to-treat illnesses every year. It's important to address the issue, and while some campaigns aiming to educate the public on how to help prevent this have taken place, they haven't been enough. Now the White House is getting involved, with the Obama administration detailing its recent past efforts and future plans for addressing the issue, including the development of diagnostic tests and limiting inappropriate prescriptions.

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Cloud DX: First working tricorder prototype for XPrize revealed

Cloud DX: First working tricorder prototype for XPrize revealed

If you hate getting poked and prodded for a medical exam, you're not alone. I've always been envious of the crew on Star Trek; they made it look so easy as Dr. Crusher waved a tricorder over her patients for an instantaneous exam. The tricorder is like a medical diagnostic magic wand; it was assumed to be fictional, until now. The Cloud DX is the first prototype to be revealed for the Tricorder XPrize competition. The device is designed to diagnose 15 different medical conditions and can monitor vital signs for 72 hours.

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Bioprinter 3D-prints living cartilage nose in 16 minutes

Bioprinter 3D-prints living cartilage nose in 16 minutes

While traditional 3D-printers build objects using layers of plastic, we've seem some great strides in 3D-printing like lattices emerging from amorphous, resinous goo. Now bioprinters are entering the ring with their ability to create 3D models from biological materials. There's no need to wait for an ear to grow on the back of a mouse; this bioprinter from the ETH Zurich Cartilage Engineering and Regeneration Group can print a nose from biopolymers and living cartilage cells in only 16 minutes. Best of all, no mice are harmed in the process!

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Premera Blue Cross breached by hackers

Premera Blue Cross breached by hackers

Hackers have found their way into servers that contained medical information on subscribers to health insurance provider Premera Blue Cross. The health insurance company announced this week that it had been the victim of a cyberattack that could have exposed medical data and financial details on its subscribers. As many as 11 million people could be affected by the breach.

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New Narbis neurofeedback glasses force you to concentrate

New Narbis neurofeedback glasses force you to concentrate

It's so easy to get distracted these days when we really need to focus. A new set of glasses may hold the key to honing your concentration. These glasses aren't prescription strength; they actually darken when you become unfocused which trains your brain to concentrate so the lenses stay clear. Perhaps calling them glasses is a bit of a misnomer. It's actually the Narbis wearable neurofeedback device. Narbis is hoping to take the focus-improving science of neurofeedback out of a clinical setting and bring it to everyone through Kickstarter.

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23andMe plans to make drugs based on customer data

23andMe plans to make drugs based on customer data

23andMe has had a somewhat rocky existence, first offering data on one's own ancestry and genetic data, then stripping that down to only ancestry information coupled with raw data that coupld be parsed for medical reasons by third-party companies. That was due to meddling by the FDA. That was recently changed with genetic test kit approval (though conditions apply), and now the company has made a very big announcement: it is planning to use customer data to make pharmaceutical drugs.

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Heart-on-a-chip tests drugs’ cardiotoxicity with its real heartbeat

Heart-on-a-chip tests drugs’ cardiotoxicity with its real heartbeat

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans. Recently the bio-tech industry has been exploding with cardiac research like last week's heart attack preventing nanobots. New research by the team at the University of California, Berkley has created working human heart cells on a tiny chip designed to test the efficacy of new drugs in clinical trials. This heart-on-a-chip is officially known as a cardiac microphysiological system, or MPS. Using this heart-on-a-chip, scientists can measure the potential cardiac damage of a drug before it reaches expensive human trials.

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MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

Organ transplant lists are notoriously long. Sometimes a patient in need has to wait years to receive a transplant, if they are lucky enough to receive one at all. The most successful transplants come from living donors, but a faithful friend isn't always a medical match to her friend in need. Enter MatchGrid, a biomedical program designed to match potential kidney donors and recipients. MatchGrid was created by former WIRED editor and kidney recipient David Jacobs. His program established a method to match twelve people and create a six-way kidney transplant chain.

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