medical

Japan may place emergency toilets and water in elevators

Japan may place emergency toilets and water in elevators

Japan is frequently hit by earthquakes and while they don’t typically cause major destruction, the frequent earthquakes do often leave people trapped in elevators. Recently an earthquake left dozens of people trapped for over an hour after a magnitude 7.8 quake hit the country on Saturday leaving people stuck in lifts inside buildings. Most of the elevators in building stopped at the closest floor and the doors opened to let passengers out.

Continue Reading

Implantable biosensor chip can monitor glucose and drugs in real-time

Implantable biosensor chip can monitor glucose and drugs in real-time

A team from the EPFL integrated Systems Laboratory have unveiled a new implantable sensor that is about a centimeter long that is designed to be implanted under a person's skin and gets power from a patch on the surface of the skin. The sensor is able to communicate with a mobile phone and is designed to measure the concentration of certain molecules in the body at the same time.

Continue Reading

Bioengineered bacteria change color in urine to indicate diseases

Bioengineered bacteria change color in urine to indicate diseases

Science is going to great lengths to harness the ability to detect disease before it can wreak havoc on the human body. From a cancer detecting bra, to a smartphone accessory that can detect HIV, new medical gadgets are making it easier to identify what ails us. Recently, researchers have decided to do away with the gadgetry altogether, letting bacteria do the work. These new, mutant bacteria are bioengineered to detect specific diseases, and change the color of the patient's urine for a fast diagnosis.

Continue Reading

Mind-controlled bionic prosthetic legs unveiled by Ossur

Mind-controlled bionic prosthetic legs unveiled by Ossur

A company called Ossur based in Iceland creates some of the most advanced bionic lower limb prosthetic devices available. The lower leg prosthetic devices that the company builds have the ability to sense the phase of the gait of the user and smoothly power the artificial ankle joint to get the foot in the proper alignment for a natural stride. Recently the company announced a new breakthrough in prosthetics that make the lower limb even more natural and lifelike when walking.

Continue Reading

Brain controlled robotic arm lets paralyzed man drink

Brain controlled robotic arm lets paralyzed man drink

Picking up a cup from the counter to take a drink is something that we all do hundreds of times a month without putting much thought into it. The process of picking up a cup is rather complex when you stop and think about it since we have to hold the cup in a way that it doesn’t spill and need to put enough pressure on the cup to keep it from dropping, but not so much that we crush the cup.

Continue Reading

Smartphone video microscope finds blood parasites

Smartphone video microscope finds blood parasites

The challenge for medical professionals that work in the field, especially in developing nations where the lab facilities we take for granted in the US and other countries aren’t available, is having the equipment needed to diagnoses medical conditions. A team of researchers led by engineers from UC Berkley has developed a new microscope that works in conjunction with a smartphone to detect and quantify infection by parasites in the blood.

Continue Reading

Harmony Rehab Exoskeleton helps people recover from spinal injuries

Harmony Rehab Exoskeleton helps people recover from spinal injuries

It can be very difficult for people who suffer from spinal and neurological injuries to get better and regain all functionality. Getting better often involves lots of rehabilitation with therapists and doctors along with months or years of work. Researchers from the UT Austin Cockrell School of Engineering have created a new robotic exoskeleton that is designed to help people recover faster from injuries.

Continue Reading

3D-printed splint keeps babies breathing

3D-printed splint keeps babies breathing

This isn't the first time we've seen printed bio-materials find a place in the medical sphere. Last month a bio-printer created an implantable nose made from 3D-printed cartilage. In this case, a team of researchers from the University of Michigan created tracheal splints from 3D-printed bio-material that can be inserted into a child's windpipe to treat tracheobronchomalacia, a condition that causes spontaneous airway collapse. Babies born with the condition are often given a terminal diagnosis and shortened lifespan.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next