medical

New blood test detects concussions days after they happen

New blood test detects concussions days after they happen

Concussions are a serious problem in the world of sports, particularly when it comes to youth sports — concussion symptoms are sometimes delayed in children (less commonly in adults, as well), meaning an evaluation immediately after an incident may not accurately reflect the nature of the injury. Researchers have discovered a way to deal with this, developing a new type of blood test that can identify whether someone has suffered a concussion up to a week after it happened.

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Samsung brainBAND tracks concussions in athletes

Samsung brainBAND tracks concussions in athletes

Samsung Electronics Australia has rolled out a new bit of tech called the brainBAND that is designed to help coaches and medics keep up with concussion injuries in athletes. The brainBAND is a wearable device and the prototype was developed via the Samsung Launching People program that puts a pair of researchers from different backgrounds together to see how tech can help solve challenges in society.

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Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Anyone who has been around a diabetic that has to prick their fingers multiple times a day to check their blood glucose levels can understand in an instant just how difficult and annoying the disease can be. Factor in the need for some diabetics to not only prick fingers to check glucose levels, but to give themselves shots of insulin to control the blood sugar and things only get worse for diabetics. Scientists have developed an innovative medical device that might make diabetes less of a prick.

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Apple Watch gets built-in ECG monitor with Kardia Band

Apple Watch gets built-in ECG monitor with Kardia Band

The Apple Watch's heart rate monitor has been praised before about how accurate it is for a smartwatch, but now it's about to get even more advanced with a medical-grade ECG (electrocardiogram) monitor built into the new Kardia Band from accessory maker AliveCor. The watch band features a small metal sensor on the side that communicates with an accompanying app on the device itself, monitoring and alerting wearers of abnormal heart rates.

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NY’s digital prescriptions use tech to battle addiction

NY’s digital prescriptions use tech to battle addiction

Paper prescriptions: they're hard to read, easy to lose, and, for those particularly desperate, not terribly difficult to modify. Starting March 27, New York will be the first state to require all doctors to submit prescriptions digitally rather than writing them out on a sheet of paper. Doing so presents some minor downsides for patients — namely, they’re stuck with whatever pharmacy receives it rather than being able to take it wherever is cheapest at that moment — but there are several upsides as well.

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Designer (successfully) 3D prints his own invisible braces

Designer (successfully) 3D prints his own invisible braces

While you're patting yourself on the back for 3D printing a replacement battery cover for your TV remote, one design has proudly shown off his new smile, one made straight via a series of teeth-straightening invisible braces he created himself using a 3D printer. The end result is as successful as anyone could hope for, which is to say he's now the proud owner of perfectly aligned teeth. The orthodontic world shudders.

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MobilECG business card has a working ECG display

MobilECG business card has a working ECG display

Some folks are content with the cheapest paper business cards they can get their hands on. Others want a business card that stands out and people want to keep around. The latter type of business card is the one that will be remembered. We have seen some very cool business cards in the past, including cards that are actually Lego Minifigs and augmented reality cards.

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Asthma inhaler prototype is nearly as slim as a credit card

Asthma inhaler prototype is nearly as slim as a credit card

Asthma inhalers have largely had the same design for a very long time, and for good reason: they're relatively lightweight and small, and can be slipped into a pocket. Still, they're highly conspicuous and no one likes to pull them out in public for an impromptu puff; as well, having to carry it around is burdensome if it is reserved for the rare occasional asthma attack rather than daily use. That's where this new ultra-slim inhaler prototype comes in.

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Mind-controlled prosthetic arm can wiggle its fingers

Mind-controlled prosthetic arm can wiggle its fingers

Prosthetic research has progressed rapidly over the past few years, with researchers demonstrating increasingly fine and complex control, in some cases using direct brain connects to facilitate the movements. The industry has just unveiled yet another milestone, with John Hopkins researchers successfully demonstrating individual prosthetic finger movements performed via mind control.

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3D bioprinter used to print a transplantable human ear

3D bioprinter used to print a transplantable human ear

Scientists have developed a new 3D bioprinter that has been successfully used to print a replacement human ear that could be transplanted to a patient in need. A human ear isn't all that the scientists have used the 3D printer to create, so far the team has created part of a jawbone, muscle, and cartilage structures in addition to the ear. The team is led by Anthony Atala from the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the printer is the result of almost a decade of work.

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New polymer can retain shape changes, resets with body heat

New polymer can retain shape changes, resets with body heat

A team of University of Rochester researchers have developed a new polymer that may play a big part in the medical field in the future. The material is able to maintain a new shape after being stretched or manipulated, something in itself that isn't new, but the incredible part is that it then can be returned to its original shape with just body heat. The researchers say that's only half of their discovery, however, as during shape recovery the polymer is able to release a large amount of stored energy.

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DARPA: ‘stentrode’ implant travels to brain via blood vessels

DARPA: ‘stentrode’ implant travels to brain via blood vessels

Under DARPA’s Reliable Neural-Interface Technology program, a team from the University of Melbourne has created a new device called a ‘stentrode’ that, when implanted near one’s brain, is able to read signals from neurons. The work was done as part of a DARPA project, and it is said to be safer than implants requiring brain surgery. The device is about the size of a paperclip, according to the researchers, and it is implanted through a blood vessel.

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