medical

Smartphone video microscope finds blood parasites

Smartphone video microscope finds blood parasites

The challenge for medical professionals that work in the field, especially in developing nations where the lab facilities we take for granted in the US and other countries aren’t available, is having the equipment needed to diagnoses medical conditions. A team of researchers led by engineers from UC Berkley has developed a new microscope that works in conjunction with a smartphone to detect and quantify infection by parasites in the blood.

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Harmony Rehab Exoskeleton helps people recover from spinal injuries

Harmony Rehab Exoskeleton helps people recover from spinal injuries

It can be very difficult for people who suffer from spinal and neurological injuries to get better and regain all functionality. Getting better often involves lots of rehabilitation with therapists and doctors along with months or years of work. Researchers from the UT Austin Cockrell School of Engineering have created a new robotic exoskeleton that is designed to help people recover faster from injuries.

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3D-printed splint keeps babies breathing

3D-printed splint keeps babies breathing

This isn't the first time we've seen printed bio-materials find a place in the medical sphere. Last month a bio-printer created an implantable nose made from 3D-printed cartilage. In this case, a team of researchers from the University of Michigan created tracheal splints from 3D-printed bio-material that can be inserted into a child's windpipe to treat tracheobronchomalacia, a condition that causes spontaneous airway collapse. Babies born with the condition are often given a terminal diagnosis and shortened lifespan.

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Playing Candy Crush Saga non-stop for 8 weeks ruptures man’s thumb tendon

Playing Candy Crush Saga non-stop for 8 weeks ruptures man’s thumb tendon

BlackBerry users from days of yore may remember the condition that was jokingly dubbed BlackBerry thumb — that is, a repetitive strain injury caused by tapping the device's buttons over and over again for long periods of time. Well, that condition can develop from any repetitive thumb use, and as this story reveals, one modern candidate may be the smartphone game Candy Crush Saga. Addiction to the free-to-play Candy Crush games isn't new, but this California man's playing was so excessive, he didn't even notice the pain leading up to a thumb tendon rupture.

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Apple makes ResearchKit available to Devs and researchers

Apple makes ResearchKit available to Devs and researchers

ResearchKit has the capacity to truly change things. Today, Apple is letting Developers and researchers realize its promise, and has opened ResearchKit up to anyone who wants to contribute. Developers are now free to develop apps that utilize the framework, and researchers can begin new studies to aide in ramping up their studies. Announced at Apple’s March event, ResearchKit uses an iPhone as a diagnostic tool when users opt-in to providing data. On launch, Apple and a few select partners had medical studies relating to Breast Cancer, Parkinson’s Disease, Asthma, and Cardiovascular Disease.

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White House details plan to fight drug-resistant bacteria

White House details plan to fight drug-resistant bacteria

Drug-resistant bacteria is a serious problem, causing thousands of deaths in the US (and even more elsewhere) and millions of hard-to-treat illnesses every year. It's important to address the issue, and while some campaigns aiming to educate the public on how to help prevent this have taken place, they haven't been enough. Now the White House is getting involved, with the Obama administration detailing its recent past efforts and future plans for addressing the issue, including the development of diagnostic tests and limiting inappropriate prescriptions.

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Cloud DX: First working tricorder prototype for XPrize revealed

Cloud DX: First working tricorder prototype for XPrize revealed

If you hate getting poked and prodded for a medical exam, you're not alone. I've always been envious of the crew on Star Trek; they made it look so easy as Dr. Crusher waved a tricorder over her patients for an instantaneous exam. The tricorder is like a medical diagnostic magic wand; it was assumed to be fictional, until now. The Cloud DX is the first prototype to be revealed for the Tricorder XPrize competition. The device is designed to diagnose 15 different medical conditions and can monitor vital signs for 72 hours.

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