medical

DARPA: ‘stentrode’ implant travels to brain via blood vessels

DARPA: ‘stentrode’ implant travels to brain via blood vessels

Under DARPA’s Reliable Neural-Interface Technology program, a team from the University of Melbourne has created a new device called a ‘stentrode’ that, when implanted near one’s brain, is able to read signals from neurons. The work was done as part of a DARPA project, and it is said to be safer than implants requiring brain surgery. The device is about the size of a paperclip, according to the researchers, and it is implanted through a blood vessel.

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This donkey has a prosthetic leg and her name is Bella Burro

This donkey has a prosthetic leg and her name is Bella Burro

A donkey in Minnesota is living the good life thanks to a prosthetic leg made specifically for her. Her name is Bella Burro, and if it weren't for a couple in Minneapolis, she'd be dead. Totally dead. But she's alive, and she's got her own Facebook page, and it's all thank to both that couple of folks and the fine people at Arise Orthotics. As of this article's posting, Bella is 2 years and 5 months old, and fabulous as ever.

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Dissolving sensor can be used to measure intracranial pressure

Dissolving sensor can be used to measure intracranial pressure

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois led by professor John Rogers has designed an implantable sensor that can be injected into the brain to monitor intracranial pressure and temperature for about five days. That is the length of time where the pressure and temperature inside the head need to be monitored after some sort of traumatic brain injury.

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Myo armband used to control prosthetic arm

Myo armband used to control prosthetic arm

Researchers around the world are working to make prosthetic limbs more lifelike to give people who have lost arms or legs the ability to have a more normal life. Researchers have recently used Myo armbands to allow a prosthetic wearer to control a robotic prosthetic arm wirelessly.

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Myo gesture control band controls MPL prosthetic arm

Myo gesture control band controls MPL prosthetic arm

The Modular Prosthetic Limb has suddenly become a lot more versatile as the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory-developed prosthetic works with the Myo armband. The Myo armband is a gesture-control accessory that allows people to control all manner of devices and software as it senses movements in their arm*. Muscles expand and contract and the armband sends signals wirelessly to other devices. In this case, it means that the armbands are able to give this MPL arm movement.

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MC10 “BioStamp” connects to your body, shares data

MC10 “BioStamp” connects to your body, shares data

Amid waves of wearables at CES 2016, MC10 have revealed the BioStamp Research Connect System. This system works with a sort of soft stamp, or sticker, that sticks to your body and shares physiological data with computers. These flexible body-worn sensors allow the wearer to operate entirely normally as they bend and move with the body, rather than hindering it. This system reduces observation error at the same time as it improves data capture, so says MC10.

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E-cigarette liquid ingredient can cause ‘popcorn lung’ disease

E-cigarette liquid ingredient can cause ‘popcorn lung’ disease

A new Harvard study has found that many e-cigarette liquids contain an ingredient linked to ‘popcorn lung,’ a serious lung disease that got its name after popcorn plant workers developed the disease from exposure to artificial butter fumes. The chemical in question is diacetyl, and Harvard researchers found that more than 75-percent of the liquids and ecigs they tested contained the ingredient.

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Pain killer patch releases ibuprofen over 12 hours

Pain killer patch releases ibuprofen over 12 hours

Ibuprofen can be seen as one of the most useful medications available today; just two to four pills of the pain killer can help treat headaches to muscle pain. But researchers may have just improved its effectiveness by developing the world's first ibuprofen patch capable of releasing the drug over a 12 hour period once applied to the skin. That sounds much better than having to remember to take the pills every four hours or so.

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Bio-ink used to print ‘living’ blood vessels

Bio-ink used to print ‘living’ blood vessels

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have 3D printed living blood vessels using a “bio-ink” — that is, a mash of materials that the human body finds agreeable. Using this ink, principal investigator Monica Moya and team have printed blood vessels that lead to further growth of capillaries. Said Moya, "This technology can take biology from the traditional petri dish to a 3D physiologically relevant tissue patch with functional vasculature."

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Virtual leg injury helps train combat medics

Virtual leg injury helps train combat medics

The difficulty in training combat medics is easy to understand. The combat medic is often in the field with other soldiers and at times alone and tasked to save the lives of his friends and fellow soldiers without assistance. Training on how to treat a myriad of wounds and injuries is vitally important. A new virtual system is being used to train combat medics on how to treat leg wounds.

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Tech tattoos put a working circuit board on your skin

Tech tattoos put a working circuit board on your skin

Technology-imbued tattoos have been discussed many a times over the last year, but now, Chaotic Moon Studios, a creative technology start-up, has taken another step towards making them feasible. Dubbed "Tech Tats," the temporary tattoos use LED lights, a micro-controller, and conductive inks to create a circuit board on the surface of the skin. While they certainly look cool, Chaotic Moon imagines Tech Tats as being much more than cosmetic, from serving as a new form of wearable to playing a part in medical applications.

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