medical

Motorized device helps infants at risk for cerebral palsy

Motorized device helps infants at risk for cerebral palsy

This may look like how Eleven started as an infant in Stranger Things, but it's actually a device that is designed to help infants who are at risk of developing cerebral palsy. This condition covers a range of early neurological disorders that affect movement and muscle coordination and can be caused from a number of factors. Those factors include brain damage during birth, infection, and trauma.

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Kinsa Elmo smart ear thermometer tracks temps via app

Kinsa Elmo smart ear thermometer tracks temps via app

Everything is connected today from your toothbrush to your TV. It's no surprise that our thermometers are now connected as well. Kinsa has debuted a new ear thermometer that is designed to look like Elmo from Sesame Street and is called the Elmo Smart Ear Thermometer. The connected device mixes the ability to take your temperature along with the ability to track symptoms via the app.

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‘Harpoon’ device eliminates open heart surgery for mitral valve repairs

‘Harpoon’ device eliminates open heart surgery for mitral valve repairs

A new device may revolutionize the world of mitral valve repair, making it possible for surgeons to fix this particular heart problem without having to perform open heart surgery. According to researchers investigating the device, which is called ‘harpoon,’ it has shown 100-percent performance and safety for this medical purpose. Unlike open heart surgery, using the image-guided contraption is safer for the patient, less physically taxing, and requires much less recovery time. In fact, the researchers estimate someone could leave the hospital the day after a mitral valve repair is performed with Harpoon.

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Glaucoma researchers restore partial vision in blind mice

Glaucoma researchers restore partial vision in blind mice

A group of Stanford researchers may have just made significant progress in finding a way to cure or treat Glaucoma, the illness that gradually leads to blindness. In an experiment involving blind mice with a glaucoma-like condition, they managed to restore partial eyesight in the animals, the first time for such an accomplishment in mammals.

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Theranos CEO banned from running lab for 2 years by US regulators

Theranos CEO banned from running lab for 2 years by US regulators

Over the last year, blood-testing startup Theranos has fallen from its position as a rising star in Silicon Valley. The company has become the subject of several federal investigations, been accused of false advertising and unreliable test results, and found to be operating without FDA approval, all following an investigation by The Wall Street Journal eight months ago over recurring irregularities. Now Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes has been federally banned from running a US lab for the next two years.

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Why this vast helium discovery is being called “life-saving”

Why this vast helium discovery is being called “life-saving”

You might associate helium with party balloons and squeaky voices, but the gas is a whole lot more important: that's why scientists have been so worried in recent years of a helium shortage. Vital for everything from MRI scanners through to essential nuclear energy production systems, helium's usefulness has traditionally stood at odds with its relative rarity.

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DARPA program seeks ‘rugged drugs’ that don’t expire

DARPA program seeks ‘rugged drugs’ that don’t expire

Much like the food in your fridge and the cleaning supplies in your closet, the drugs — both over the counter and prescription — in your medicine cabinet have an expiration date. While that expiration date isn’t a hard and fast rule in most cases, at least according to past research on the matter, it does mark a time when one can expect the medication to start losing potency, making it difficult to take proper dosages. Thanks to a new synthetic protein recently detailed by DARPA, however, that reality may itself soon be obsolete.

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FDA approves home stomach pump to combat obesity

FDA approves home stomach pump to combat obesity

This week, the Food and Drug Administration announced its approval of a stomach-draining device called AspireAssist; it is designed to combat obesity via a drainage tube and port implanted in the patient’s stomach, allowing the patient to drain some of their stomach contents after they eat. When used properly, the device will drain about 30-percent of a meal's calories, according to the FDA, essentially serving as an alternative to lap band surgeries.

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Upcoming Theranos movie will star Jennifer Lawrence as CEO

Upcoming Theranos movie will star Jennifer Lawrence as CEO

One of the recent trends we've seen in Hollywood is movies based on drama surrounding Silicon Valley companies. We've had movies based on the origins of Facebook as well as Steve Jobs, and now the medical startup Theranos, the subject of many regulatory investigations, is next. It looks like the yet-untitled film is getting some real acting talent too, with Deadline recently reporting that actress Jennifer Lawrence will be playing Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes.

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Theranos ‘Voids’ Tens of Thousands Of Blood Tests, Casts Doubt On Edison Device

Theranos ‘Voids’ Tens of Thousands Of Blood Tests, Casts Doubt On Edison Device

Sometimes, when a medical technology appears to be too good to be true, it actually is. Witness the debacle that has dogged Theranos Inc. and its promise of being able to run multiple blood tests based on very small samples using its proprietary Edison device. In the fall of 2015 it was revealed by the Wall Street Journal that Theranos, which had parlayed Edison into a $9 billion stock market valuation, was actually making use of traditional blood analysis machines and procedures while it awaited FDA approval of Edison itself. Now, the WSJ is reporting that Theranos has 'voided' two years of Edison blood tests.

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New blood glucose monitor replaces finger pricks with microwaves

New blood glucose monitor replaces finger pricks with microwaves

The future holds a lot of promise for diabetics, not the least of which is because of the more advanced glucose monitors researchers have been creating. There's the Patch monitor, a band-like wearable that sticks on the skin to keep track of sugar levels. Similar but suitably different is a new contraption created by researchers at Cardiff University's School of Engineering -- a small device that attaches to the skin and uses microwaves instead of finger pricks to check sugar levels.

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This ultra-thin electronic skin puts a digital display on your body

This ultra-thin electronic skin puts a digital display on your body

Smartwatches and fitness device may be the wearables of today, but in the not-too-distant future we be using super-thin skin-like membranes that can put a digital display right on the surface of our bodies. University of Tokyo researchers are bringing us closer to such a future, as they've been developing a new type of electronic skin, or e-skin, that is nearly as flexible and stretchy as the real stuff, but has the benefit of putting polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) on your hand or anywhere it's applied.

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