Medical Gadgets

The RP-7 robot plays doctor

The RP-7 robot plays doctor

Pretty much everyone has had at least one if not several bad experiences in hospitals. Well this robotic doctor was created to try to make your stay at the hospital a little better.

PillCam ESO 2 – Take one and call me in the morning

PillCam ESO 2 – Take one and call me in the morning

Are you worried about how everything is working on the inside? No, not your computer's insides, your insides. There are some pretty exciting gross pics after the jump of just what you can see with the new PillCam ESO 2.

The PillCam is basically a small camera that they have crammed inside of a giant pill. It has just recently been approved by the FDA. So just swallow this huge pill and it will start clicking pictures at a rate of 14 images per second.

The Vitality GlowCap

The Vitality GlowCap

Taking your pills can be difficult to remember and frankly not everyone needs a day sorter. Really, those things are even inconvenient for the people that are stuck using them. This pill cap might be a great alternative.

Exoskeleton for rent

Exoskeleton for rent

A while back ago Cyberdyne showed off their latest Hybrid Assistive Limb exoskeleton HAL-5. It was designed with the idea of letting the elderly and disabled rediscover their lost strength.

Soldiers get new robot arms

Soldiers get new robot arms

Better known, perhaps, for titting about on a Segway, Dean Kamen occasionally reminds us all that he's an inventor not to be underestimated.  For every two-wheeled steed in Steve Wozniak's stable there's an equivalent "let's do some good" development like the IBOT balancing wheelchair.  Latest on the list is a robotic prosthetic arm for members of the armed services who have lost limbs through various kinds of explosives; Dean showed the prototype in action during TED, with a video of a soldier using the arm to write.

The video is yet to appear on his site, but apparently shows the solider using it to scratch his nose, pick up a pen and perform other delicate actions.  Of equal importance on a mental level is the fact that it can be covered with a perfect, mirror-image cast of the individual's other arm.

InfoWorld [via BoingBoing]

Doctors get more choice in tablets

Doctors get more choice in tablets

First off I ignored this Philips medical tablet, thinking I was seeing stories about Motion's C5 Mobile Clinical Assistant.  But it turns out that the high-tech medic has a choice of touchscreens for their virtual practice.  This one, excitingly, not only has a 10.4-inch display, digital camera, WiFi and Bluetooth, it can read barcodes and RFID tags and - according to Philips - has a "ground breaking" hand grip.

 

Emergency Medical Information in your wallet

Emergency Medical Information in your wallet

Given the current climate of litigation, it's actually statistically more dangerous to attempt to resuscitate an unconscious person in the street than it is to dance naked in a pit of angry, poisonous snakes.  Get one thing wrong and before you know it, you're up in the dock trying to explain why jabbing someone in the throat with the barrel of a biro seemed like a great idea at the time.  Luckily, impromptu medical calamity should soon be a thing of the bleary eyed past, as we all get our hands on EMI's 911 rCard.

As is obvious from the picture and the name, it's a credit card sized slab of medical-documentation goodness.  Scroll keys allow for navigating multiple pages of allergies, current medication and charts from recent scans and tests.  Should the USB-rechargeable battery go dead, the toll-free number on the back links to the subscription-based EMI service, who for $20 a year will keep your information updated and available should you fall to the ground after drinking far too many carbonated beverages.

VR limbs help alleviate Phantom Limb Pain

VR limbs help alleviate Phantom Limb Pain

Phantom Limb Pain (PLP) is something difficult to conceptualise if you've not experienced it.  People who haven't had to have parts of their body amputated don't immediately understand that, when injury is experienced somewhere on them, it's the brain that registers what we know of as "pain".  Yet for amputees it can be a debilitating problem, with incredible episodes of chronic discomfort that cannot be treated due to the limb not actually being present.  Until now it's been almost impossible to deal with; however, researchers at the University of Manchester, UK, have given sufferers a fake limb - not made of rubber or plastic, but experienced through virtual reality.

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