Medical Gadgets

Prick-free way to monitor glucose might be the future

Prick-free way to monitor glucose might be the future

Diabetes is nothing to take lightly but many of its life-threatening dangers can be avoided by vigilance. Sadly, despite our hi-tech age, monitoring blood sugar levels still feels almost medieval, drawing a drop of blood to feed into portable glucometers. Luckily, science and technology might be on the verge of coming up with less invasive means to measure glucose levels. At the University of Leeds in the UK, a small device utilizes lasers to do all the measuring, and it's low-powered enough not to do any damage to your skin, much less prick it.

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App aims to save lives by diagnosing pneumonia earlier

App aims to save lives by diagnosing pneumonia earlier

In many parts of the world, there aren’t enough doctors to take care of people leading to higher mortality rates. A team from Makerere University in Uganda was the only African team to win in the 2014-2015 Big Ideas Contest organized by the University of California Berkeley. The device that the team won with tied for second place in the contest and is an app and cell phone combo designed to aid in detecting pneumonia early.

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Google develops health wearable for medical, research tracking

Google develops health wearable for medical, research tracking

The unmonitored period between doctor visits can make it difficult for medical professionals to adequately treat patients with chronic issues, and to fill that void are various medical gadgets designed to monitor some aspect of one's daily life or health metrics. Google has decided to enter that market with a new health wearable, one that will be targeted at doctors and those performing clinical trials rather than the average consumer. The wearable was developed by Google X.

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BrainPort V100 allows the blind to see using their tongue

BrainPort V100 allows the blind to see using their tongue

A device that sounds very strange has won FDA approval to come to market. The device is called the BrainPort V100 and it is a sensory substitution device that is designed to give the blind vision of a sort. Seeing in this case is done via an electrode that stimulates the tongue of the user. The FDA cleared Wicab, the maker of the device, to bring it to market last week.

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Bioengineered bacteria change color in urine to indicate diseases

Bioengineered bacteria change color in urine to indicate diseases

Science is going to great lengths to harness the ability to detect disease before it can wreak havoc on the human body. From a cancer detecting bra, to a smartphone accessory that can detect HIV, new medical gadgets are making it easier to identify what ails us. Recently, researchers have decided to do away with the gadgetry altogether, letting bacteria do the work. These new, mutant bacteria are bioengineered to detect specific diseases, and change the color of the patient's urine for a fast diagnosis.

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New Ebola-proof tablet designed for medical field workers

New Ebola-proof tablet designed for medical field workers

Ebola field doctors' need for an "Ebola-proof" tablet is finally filled. Hose it down with de-contaminating bleach, and all of the data will still be safe as its virus-free exterior. Here's something you probably never considered about the world's Ebola outbreaks: How can doctors and nurses keep track of patient data when every piece of paper, pen, and clipboard becomes contaminated just by being in the hot zone? As it turns out, according to Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), the doctors were shouting patient data over makeshift barricades to avoid spreading the contagion.

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Cloud DX: First working tricorder prototype for XPrize revealed

Cloud DX: First working tricorder prototype for XPrize revealed

If you hate getting poked and prodded for a medical exam, you're not alone. I've always been envious of the crew on Star Trek; they made it look so easy as Dr. Crusher waved a tricorder over her patients for an instantaneous exam. The tricorder is like a medical diagnostic magic wand; it was assumed to be fictional, until now. The Cloud DX is the first prototype to be revealed for the Tricorder XPrize competition. The device is designed to diagnose 15 different medical conditions and can monitor vital signs for 72 hours.

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Bioprinter 3D-prints living cartilage nose in 16 minutes

Bioprinter 3D-prints living cartilage nose in 16 minutes

While traditional 3D-printers build objects using layers of plastic, we've seem some great strides in 3D-printing like lattices emerging from amorphous, resinous goo. Now bioprinters are entering the ring with their ability to create 3D models from biological materials. There's no need to wait for an ear to grow on the back of a mouse; this bioprinter from the ETH Zurich Cartilage Engineering and Regeneration Group can print a nose from biopolymers and living cartilage cells in only 16 minutes. Best of all, no mice are harmed in the process!

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New Narbis neurofeedback glasses force you to concentrate

New Narbis neurofeedback glasses force you to concentrate

It's so easy to get distracted these days when we really need to focus. A new set of glasses may hold the key to honing your concentration. These glasses aren't prescription strength; they actually darken when you become unfocused which trains your brain to concentrate so the lenses stay clear. Perhaps calling them glasses is a bit of a misnomer. It's actually the Narbis wearable neurofeedback device. Narbis is hoping to take the focus-improving science of neurofeedback out of a clinical setting and bring it to everyone through Kickstarter.

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Targeted nano-particles can now prevent heart attacks

Targeted nano-particles can now prevent heart attacks

Soon it may be possible to prevent heart attacks by an injection of nano-particles into the bloodstream, according to the newest research paper from the scientists at Columbia University Medical Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America. A large part of that is atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. This occurs as plaques build up along the inside of the arterial wall. The research team created targeted nano-particles designed to heal atherosclerosis. This is the latest discovery in a growing field of pint-sized medical discoveries. We've seen robots that can swim inside your eyeball and smart pills, but nothing as small as this nano-treatment.

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