malware

Google can now scan your firmware for viruses and malware

Google can now scan your firmware for viruses and malware

When your computer gets a virus or some malware, you'll generally run some sort of antivirus scan to get rid of it. And that's all well and good, as long as the malicious code is contained somewhere on the hard drive of your machine. But what happens when the infection is somewhere deeper?

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Hyatt names dates and locations of credit card breach

Hyatt names dates and locations of credit card breach

Last month we brought you the news that Hyatt had discovered malware in its credit card processing systems. Obviously, that's the last place you'd want to find malware in a hotel chain. While the company said that it was investigating the issues, we didn't get much information pertaining to how long the malware was on the system, and how many locations were affected. Hyatt has come forward today to answer those questions.

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Hyatt hotels reveal malware discovered in payment systems

Hyatt hotels reveal malware discovered in payment systems

Following a series of hotel chains that have recently disclosed the presence of malware in their payment processing systems, Hyatt has come forward as the latest to fall victim. The chain says it made the discovery on November 30th, and is advising any guests who stayed at a Hyatt in recent months to double-check their bank statements for signs of fraud.

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In response to Superfish, Microsoft will block adware at OS level

In response to Superfish, Microsoft will block adware at OS level

Early this year, Lenovo was placed on the hot seat after word of the Superfish adware pre-installed on many of its devices became public. Since then, there has been an increased scrutiny of similar traps that lurk within OEM computers, especially those baked inside the OS or even the firmware. In response to these kind of attacks, Microsoft announced that it will enforce a new security model starting next year that will disallow that kind of software on Windows and instead force advertisers to abide by browser features and rules.

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“InstaAgent” app axed from app stores for stealing credentials

“InstaAgent” app axed from app stores for stealing credentials

Some people are way too obsessed with finding out who viewed their social networking pages. Instead of relying on sanctioned analytics (which are mostly only available to brand or product owners), some resort to third party services and apps to do the snooping for them. More often than not, however, these become vehicles of viruses and malware that plague social networking sites. One such example is "Who Viewed Your Profile - InstaAgent", a mobile app that claims to do what its name says it does for Instagram, while pilfering your account name and password to do very bad stuff.

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New Android malware type gets root-level access, almost impossible to remove

New Android malware type gets root-level access, almost impossible to remove

If you thought the Android platform was on the verge of getting more secure following this summer's Stagefright exploit, you thought wrong. The security researchers at Lookout have identified a new type of Android malware that, after disguising itself as a popular app, gains root access to a device and works itself so deep into the operating system that it's nearly impossible to remove. Users might need to have manufacturers reflash the OS, or just flat-out replace the device, as a factory reset won't be enough.

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Hacker alleges Fitbit smartband could be a malware carrier [UPDATE: Fitbit responds]

Hacker alleges Fitbit smartband could be a malware carrier [UPDATE: Fitbit responds]

PCs, smartphones, and tablets are fair game to hackers these days. And we've also started to see cars with sophisticated infotainment systems and controls also getting hacked. But how about the innocent little whose sole purpose is to keep your body healthy? Well, now they're getting hacked as well. And worse, they might be used to make other computers unhealthy. Fortinet researcher Axelle Apvrille reveals that the Fitbit is one such wearable that easily succumbs to a hack in just 10 seconds and can then spread the malware to computers it syncs with.

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Kemoge adware infects Android phones by rooting them

Kemoge adware infects Android phones by rooting them

Adware, or malicious programs designed to serve ads and gain user information, aren't exactly new, especially on Android. Most are a nuisance at best, but some do make a lot of damage. Security firm FireEye has stumbled on yet another one of the latter class. Dubbed Kemoge, from the command and control or CnC server that it communicates with, this particular malware has one rather frightening ability beyond incessantly flooding you with ads. It can actually root vulnerable devices, which practically gives hackers a direct open door into the device.

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Yispecter iOS malware infects devices that aren’t jailbroken

Yispecter iOS malware infects devices that aren’t jailbroken

iOS malware is nothing new, but for the most part, if your device wasn't jailbroken you really didn’t have to worry about malware much. That has now changed with a new malware called Yispecter that has been discovered that attacks non-jailbroken iOS devices. The malware is the first seen that abuses private APIs in iOS to implement its malicious functionality.

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The fright ain’t over yet: Stagefright 2.0 goes for MP3s

The fright ain’t over yet: Stagefright 2.0 goes for MP3s

The nightmare might be over, but the scare continues ever so slightly. Security outfit Zimperium labs, who broke the news about the first Stagefright, are now back with some bad news. There is a Stagefright version 2.0. This time, the vulnerability comes from two vectors, one of them the same libstagefright responsible for the first security hole. And this time, it rides on MP3 audio as well as MP4 videos. Fortunately, thanks to the first Stagefright, implementing an exploit requires a bit more work but still possible.

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Apple advises users, developers on XcodeGhost scare

Apple advises users, developers on XcodeGhost scare

Sometimes it's Android and sometimes it's iOS, but both platforms has had their share of highly publicized security nightmares. This time, it's Apple's turn to take the heat, though partly through no fault of its own. The recent XcodeGhost malware that has affected dozens, possibly even hundreds, of iOS apps, mostly from China, has definitely worried not a few users. Now Cupertino is setting the record straight for users and guiding developers on how to make sure they won't become unwilling carriers of this security vulnerability.

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iPhone app malware attack: details you need to know

iPhone app malware attack: details you need to know

This morning Apple released a statement on a large-scale attack on their iOS App Store. Apple is in the process of cleaning up after the attack, having found a malicious program by the name of XcodeGhost earlier today. This is the first reported case of malware making its way into Apple's App Stores in any sort of large-scale manner. According to cyber security firm Palo Alto Networks, just five malicious software-containing apps had ever been found on the iOS App Store before.

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