malware

Security software makers found to be using Superfish engine

Security software makers found to be using Superfish engine

It seems like Superfish is still one hot fish even after Lenovo has admitted its lapses in addressing the rather eerie security situation. Discovery of Superfish and Komodia, the software company that makes it all possible, has led researchers to look for other traces of the software and the results they ran into are rather shocking. It's almost acceptable that adware would make use of something like Komodia, but for software that are designed to actually keep users safe from phishing and spoofing is almost unbelievable.

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PowerOffHijack Malware keeps spying even after users shut off the device

PowerOffHijack Malware keeps spying even after users shut off the device

Malware can grant hackers unfettered access to your devices, and this time even turning off your phone can't stop them. AVG security has dubbed this threat PowerOffHijack. It's so called because it actually hijacks your ability to turn off your phone. This malware creates a false shutdown screen, so the user thinks he is turning off his phone. The screen turns black and it looks like any other time your phone has been turned off. In fact, the device is still on and just as capable of being controlled by an outside user.

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Lenovo found installing adware on its computers

Lenovo found installing adware on its computers

Bloatware might be a common curse on smartphones these days, but it didn't start with mobile devices. Even PCs and laptops bought from manufacturers and dealers had them long before. Now the biggest PC maker has just been found installing adware on machines. Lenovo used software from Superfish to inject ads into users' browsers without them knowing it, but the somewhat innocent sounding adware might actually be more trouble and more dangerous that it might initially look.

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Equation group creates “The Death Star of Malware”

Equation group creates “The Death Star of Malware”

According to the Kaspersy Labs Global Research and Analysis Team (GREAT), one piece of malware has infected thousands of victims throughout the world. The team suggests that it may be possible that tens of thousands of victims have been infected with malware made by Equation APT, or The Equation Group, through a number of "implants" - otherwise known as Trojans. These infection points are called upon by Kaspersy to identify the spread. Kaspersy calls this team of hackers The Equation group - their real identities remain a mystery.

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Hackers rob banks around the world of over $300 million

Hackers rob banks around the world of over $300 million

In what is appearing to be one of the largest bank thefts across the globe, hackers have managed to steal over $300 million from more than 100 banks in 30 different countries. The new comes from a Kaspersky Labs report given to the New York Times, which explains a large-scale, sophisticated malware was used since 2013 to siphon the money from financial institutions. No banks have officially come forward to disclose the security breaches, but victims include those in Russia, the U.S., Europe, and Japan.

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Android malware found on Google Play with millions of downloads

Android malware found on Google Play with millions of downloads

Avast has dropped the bomb on a new variety of Android malware permeating the Google Play Store, something that has found its place on millions of users' devices in the form of games and other simple -- and seemingly legit -- content. Those who have had an adware-infected computer at one time or another will be familiar with the intrusion; all goes well for the infected user for a while, but after some period of time has passed, advertisements begin appearing when the phone or tablet is unlocked, hawking products that are, in some cases, legit.

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Micromax revealed to be remotely installing bloatware

Micromax revealed to be remotely installing bloatware

Smartphone users are no strangers to bloatware, unwanted software installed by manufacturers or carriers on devices, be they laptops, tablets, or, most especially, smartphones. While some have resigned themselves to these as a fact of life, it seems that in other places, they have become more than just a simple nuisance. Indian OEM Micromax has been reported to not only install bloatware, it also installs these remotely without the user's knowledge nor consent, making this particular implementation border on being malware.

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Palo Alto Networks reveal CoolReaper backdoor on Coolpad devices

Palo Alto Networks reveal CoolReaper backdoor on Coolpad devices

Bloatware has been an annoying issue on any device, whether it be smartphone, tablet or laptop, but what Chinese OEM Coolpad is doing goes beyond bloatware into potentially criminal territory. Palo Alto Networks, the very same research firm that alerted the world to the WireLurker iOS malware last month is now hot on the trails of "CoolReaper" a backdoor software that Coolpad has intentionally installed on millions of its devices, exposing users not just to its own control but possibly to external malicious threats as well.

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FBI malware warning hints at Sony Pictures attack

FBI malware warning hints at Sony Pictures attack

The FBI has issued a warning about dangerous malware, and Reuters has acquired a five-page confidential document on it the agency sent to unspecified companies in the U.S. today. That document reportedly contains some information about the malware, and reports that it has been used in a "destructive cyberattack" in the US. The agency did not specify which company has fallen victim (nor if there is more than one), but it is believed to be related to the recent massive attack against Sony Pictures.

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Regin malware: three things you need to know

Regin malware: three things you need to know

Today the folks at Symantec have reported their discovery of the malware known as Regin. This software is detected by Symantec and Norton products as "Backdoor.Regin", and it seems clear that given the complexity of the hack, a nation state is likely responsible for its creation. This software is extremely "low key", meaning it can remain undetected for several years in a system, and even if it IS detected, it's not always possible to find out what its been up to.

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