malware

Android app secretly mines for Dogecoin, FTC not amused

Android app secretly mines for Dogecoin, FTC not amused

When you say your app is free of malware but does exactly the opposite, you aren't just lying, you could also be committing a crime. That is exactly what Prized app developers Equiliv Investments and Ryan Ramminger learned the hard way when they were slapped with an FTC complaint because their app actually used infected smartphones to help the developers mine for cryptocurrency like Dogecoin. The defendants wisely decided to settle out of court, which included a monetary judgment of $50,000, which is no small amount for someone desperately hunting for digital currency.

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Oracle’s Ask Toolbar gets the malware treatment from Microsoft

Oracle’s Ask Toolbar gets the malware treatment from Microsoft

Microsoft security tools will now be treating the Ask Toolbar that comes alongside Oracle's Java installations as "unwanted software" (a category that also includes malware). For a while now, when Windows users install Java, they have to opt out of getting the Ask Toolbar installed in their browser. Opting out is a small task, but it's enough to give Java users a bad impression of Oracle.

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Stuxnet malware child hits Kaspersky with “zero-day trampoline”

Stuxnet malware child hits Kaspersky with “zero-day trampoline”

While you don't hear the words "trampoline" and "malware" in the same sentence very often, today it's entirely warranted. Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab, a research organization that concentrates on hackers and hacking activity, have discovered a second state-sponsored group of hackers that've created malware derived from Stuxnet. A second, that is, after the USA and Isreali group discovered in 2012, creators of the Stuxnet malware used for hacking international groups, the same malware this new group used to create their own sophisticated worm.

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Hackers able to steal fingerprints from Galaxy S5, other Android phones

Hackers able to steal fingerprints from Galaxy S5, other Android phones

Fingerprint readers have quickly become commonplace on our smartphones, and while they are touted as offering some of the best security, it seems that may not be true across the board. A group of researchers at FireEye have reported a flaw in certain Android phones like the Galaxy S5 that could allow hackers to steal fingerprint data. Now, before you start panicking and preparing to set your fingerprint-based phone on fire in the name of security, know that this can only take place in extremely limited situations, and as for Android itself, the loophole was already patched with the release of Lollipop.

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Whistleblowers’ lawyer: cops supplied infected hard drive

Whistleblowers’ lawyer: cops supplied infected hard drive

Attorney Matt Campbell is representing former and current law enforcement officers in a whistleblower case, and he reportedly discovered malware on an external hard drive supplied by the Fort Smith Police Department. Three officers, both former and current, are being represented by Campbell, and are said to have been wrongfully probed after reporting issues with overtime pay and wrongful termination within the police department. As part of his discovery request, Campbell supplied the police department with an external hard drive, and they were to load it with some documents in response. When it was returned, however, it included malware.

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Dyre Wolf malware transfers victims to live operator

Dyre Wolf malware transfers victims to live operator

IBM has detailed a new variation of the Dyre malware, which it is calling "The Dyre Wolf". The malware targets large enterprises, and comes with an unexpected twist: a bit of social engineering involving a live operator posing as a representative. When on the phone with this operator, the hackers on the other side use banking information provided by the victim to initiate a large wire transfer...and in some cases use a DDoS attack to keep the company from discovering the transfer until it is too late.

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Installer Hijacking affects almost half of Android devices

Installer Hijacking affects almost half of Android devices

Android has a reputation for having a more open platform and ecosystem than, say, iOS, but, sadly, it is probably also notorious for sometimes being too open to malware as well. Of course, like any other software, it has its own fair share of vulnerabilities, but given its popularity and reach, sometimes those can be quite frightening. Take for example this "Android Installer Hijacking" technique that hails back from 2014, which could install malware on a user's Android device, naturally without the user being aware of it.

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Microsoft reports on its Superfish hunting trip

Microsoft reports on its Superfish hunting trip

Lenovo had a fish problem early this year, one that refused to die even when it was ignored. The Superfish adware fiasco left the world's biggest PC maker with mud on its face and an angry mob at its gates. While the scandal has seemingly died out, with Lenovo frantically moving to fix both the technical problems and PR fallout, not everyone is safe yet from the deadly fish. Now it's Microsoft's turn to give its users the weapon of knowledge to better arm themselves. Oh, and they are also providing an updated tool to remove Superfish.

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Xiaomi solves Mi 4 malware dustup: device was counterfeit

Xiaomi solves Mi 4 malware dustup: device was counterfeit

Yesterday, news surfaced that the Xiaomi Mi 4 came preloaded with malware. While we can handle a little bloatware, malware is just — no. Even more subversive than straight-up malware, some of the apps installed were disguised as Google apps. Security company Bluebox, who released the report, even suggested Xiaomi handed their handset off to a third party to get the malware installed, which is about as low as you can get. Now, Xiaomi has their say, and comfortably quashed any thought of malware on their devices.

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Xiaomi Mi 4 malware accusation prompts security controversy

Xiaomi Mi 4 malware accusation prompts security controversy

Earlier this week, Bluebox, a data security company, released a findings report on their tests of the Xiaomi Mi 4 smartphone. Unfortunately for Xiaomi, their results were far from stellar. Not only did the security firm find malicious malware installed on the device, but some of it was even disguised to appear as Google apps. Even worse, they believe an unknown third party tampered with the Android-powered smartphone. Read on for more details about what they found, as well as Xiaomi's official response to the report.

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