linux

Steam for Linux: 1,000 games and counting

Steam for Linux: 1,000 games and counting

The recent GDC 2015, especially the revelation of its own VR ambitions, has thrust Valve and Steam back into the spotlight. Many gamers, especially of the PC kind, might still remember the promise of Steam Machines that have yet to materialize in retail forms. But while part of that equation lies on the hardware, especially the special Steam Controller, the other part is tied to the software. So just how well is Steam doing on Linux today? Well, apparently quite healthy, but it could do with a bit more.

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Tinertia hands-on: hardcore platformer, no jump button

Tinertia hands-on: hardcore platformer, no jump button

That's what they say, the creators of Tinertia, they say it's a "Hardcore platformer. No jump button." Indeed it does seem to be, and what we've experienced at GDC 2015 temps us to suggest that it rocks. While we're big fans of the jump button (a classic button, indeed), we're also big fans of moving the gaming universe forward with non-traditional controls. A rocket-launcher as a primary controller in a side-scrolling game is just as good a controller as any - in fact for this sort of arena, it's better.

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This is the first Ubuntu phone, the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition

This is the first Ubuntu phone, the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition

The smartphone space is about to get more crowded, with the first Ubuntu phone, the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition, hoping to muscle in among Android, iOS, and Windows Phone. Targeting the midrange market that so far Android has cavorted significantly in, BQ's new phone has a 4.5-inch screen, dual SIM support, and both an 8-megapixel camera on the back and a 5-megapixel camera up-front. More important than the hardware, though, is the new software, which Ubuntu claims is more content-centric than rival platforms. That's built around what Ubuntu has dubbed Scopes, a new take on the mobile UI.

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Star Wars Humble Bundle summons the Dark Forces

Star Wars Humble Bundle summons the Dark Forces

Today Humble Bundle brings heat with a number of Star Wars-themed games for PC, Linux, and Mac. The team behind Humble Bundle have successfully high-fived the folks who own the rights to these games - previously called LucasArts - and are pushing cash to charity. Users are asked to pay $1 or more - hopefully a lot more - to gain access to a number of rad games from Star Wars history. And what's that - at least one super classic title - Dark Forces, the original 3rd-party Dash Rendar-like character first person shooter back from the dead.

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Linux C library exploit affects all systems dating back 2000

Linux C library exploit affects all systems dating back 2000

Sometimes, the price of popularity is more scrutiny. As the Linux operating system, and open source in general, gets more and more coverage in mainstream media and news, a lot of security holes, and big ones at that, are being exposed, or at the very least sensationalized. After the "Shellshock" bug last September, which was reported to be even worse than the "Heartbleed" bug of the open source OpenSSL vulnerability, comes a "GHOST" security exploit that affects almost all Linux systems that date all the way back to 2000.

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Drones, hubs and clouds: Ubuntu Core makes IoT play

Drones, hubs and clouds: Ubuntu Core makes IoT play

Linux is making another play for the Internet of Things, with Ubuntu figuring that as devices from thermostats through home hubs to personal robots and drones get smarter, they'll need a more flexible brain. Snappy Ubuntu Core is the latest platform for smart devices, promising gadgets that run exactly the same software whether locally or relying on the cloud, and thus bypassing questions about whether users are regularly upgrading, if old firmware is still in the wild, and where apps are going to come from. While Ubuntu clearly isn't alone in its IoT ambitions, Ubuntu Core does at least have an advantage some rival schemes don't: it already has users.

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MintBox Mini gives Linux users a pocket-sized PC

MintBox Mini gives Linux users a pocket-sized PC

It seems almost ironic that while are phones seem to be getting bigger, PCs are getting smaller. At least those that aren't hulking beasts constructed for raw power, for gaming and whatnot. Though not as ridiculously small as Xiaomi's Mi Box mini "set top box", if you could still call it that, this new MintBox Mini still tries to deliver a PC that is powerful enough for your basic computing needs yet small enough to fit in your pocket. Presuming, of course, you'd actually keep one in your pocket.

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Steam on Linux bug can delete all user’s files

Steam on Linux bug can delete all user’s files

No software bug is more egregious than one that can potentially wipe out users' precious files without warning or indication. Some Linux users are finding this out the hard way when they discovered that their Steam client was silently deleting files starting from the very root directory all the way into the deepest folders. While the system's files might remain intact because of how Linux security policies work, user data are left unprotected, making this serious flaw even more personal and frightening.

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Intel’s HDMI Compute Stick slaps Windows or Linux on your TV

Intel’s HDMI Compute Stick slaps Windows or Linux on your TV

There’s an undercurrent at this year’s CES that’s hard to ignore: Intel. The company is making some subtle inroads to arenas we’re not used to seeing them, their most notable non-PC showing in Dell’s interesting new Venue 8 7000 tablet. Now, the company is taking PC mobile, allowing you to take a full-fledged operating system in the form of an HDMI dongle. The Compute Stick carries an Intel Atom processor, and will be available with either a Windows or Linux OS.

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Chrome OS extension lets you run Linux in a window

Chrome OS extension lets you run Linux in a window

Linux running on a Chromebook isn’t new; it’s not even that clever. Based on the Linux kernel, Chrome OS is a lot more like a svelte Linux distro than a “traditional” operating system. Still, running Linux on the Chromebook was clumsy, asking that you split your device in two, digitally speaking. Via Google+, Chrome evangelist Francois Beaufort is announcing that brave souls in Developer Mode can now run Linux in its own window on a Chromebook. All you need is a Crouton Chrome extension.

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