linux

DIY wearable computer uses Beagleboard & wireless keyboard

DIY wearable computer uses Beagleboard & wireless keyboard

Perhaps it makes us unbearably geeky, but we do have more than a soft spot for wearable computers.  Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately for what little sartorial dignity we have left these days) manufacturers are proving more reluctant to put out suitable products, and that leaves the niche clear for DIYers.  Martin Magnusson pointed us in the direction of his own project, taking a Myvu Crystal eyepiece and hooking it up to a Beagleboard fanless computer and four AA batteries.

Continue Reading

Augen The Book LCD ereader on sale for bargain $90 [Update: Reviewed!]

Augen The Book LCD ereader on sale for bargain $90 [Update: Reviewed!]

Augen's oddly named "The Book" ereader has gone on sale, eschewing E Ink in favor of a color LCD display in a Kindle-style casing.  Available at kmart in limited numbers for just $89, the ereader runs Linux 2.6.4 on a 400MHz ARM CPU - which means no Android, unlike the Pandigital Novel - complete with WiFi b/g, 2GB of flash memory and an SD slot content with cards up to 8GB in size.

There's also apparently a web-browser, text-to-speech engine and a media player for images, audio and video.  Augen have been pretty ambitious in their ebook spec support, too; The Book will apparently display TXT, PDF, HTML, CHM, RTF, FB2, EPUB, PRC and MOBI files.

Update: The Ebook Reader picked up Augen's The Book from their local kmart and has already reviewed it; more details after the cut.

Continue Reading

Spotify for Linux launches for premium subscribers

Spotify for Linux launches for premium subscribers

Streaming music service Spotify has launched a Linux version of their software, now allowing open-source aficionados access to their catalog.  Following Spotify's Windows and Mac clients - and their various mobile apps - the early build still lacks some of the more advanced functionality of its siblings, including cached local storage for offline listening.  Most limiting, though, is the fact that it's only available for Spotify Premium subscribers.

Continue Reading

Qualcomm Snapdragon open-source efforts prove frustrating

Qualcomm Snapdragon open-source efforts prove frustrating

Qualcomm has found itself unwittingly annoying the open-source community by posting the source code for OpenGL ES 2D/3D Linux kernel driver for its Snapdragon chipset, as found in the Nexus One, Dell Streak and many other devices.  However, while the kernel driver is open-source, Qualcomm's user-space driver remains closed; that prompted David Airlie, who maintains the DRM for the Linux kernel at Red Hat, to tell Qualcomm - and anyone else considering doing the same half-hearted thing - "If you aren't going to create an open userspace driver (either MIT or LGPL) then don't waste time submitting a kernel driver to me."

Continue Reading

Insignia Infocast chumby-powered display gets hack instructions

Insignia Infocast chumby-powered display gets hack instructions

Best Buy have thrown the Insignia Infocast internet media display up for sale, and before you dismiss the 8-inch touchscreen device as just another "smart" photo frame, take a second look.  Powered by the same software as the hack-friendly Chumby, the Infocast has been described as "a $169, 800MHz ARM Linux computer with 128 MB of DDR2, 2 GB of mass storage and an 8-inch, 800 x 600 touchscreen display" by none other than Andrew "bunnie" Huang of Chumby itself.  He's revealed some of the Infocast's hidden secrets, having had a hand in the design of the touchscreen machine itself.

Continue Reading

Jolicloud 1.0 Bringing Touch Support Some Time in the Future [Video]

Jolicloud 1.0 Bringing Touch Support Some Time in the Future [Video]

Whens' the last time we saw a Jolicloud video demo? A little over a year ago. Sure, the Linux-based Operating System went into "pre-Beta" back in December, but we can safely say that it's been quite awhile since we last saw the social OS. Now, here we are that year later, and we get word from Jolicloud themselves that they're actually working on upgrading the OS, and doing so means support for touch-based screens, of course.

Continue Reading

Sharp NetWalker PC-T1 gets reviewed: Only niche appeal

Sharp NetWalker PC-T1 gets reviewed: Only niche appeal

Back when it was officially announced, we described Sharp's NetWalker PC-T1 slate as the epitome of a niche device, and sadly Pocketables' review hasn't done anything to change our opinion.  The Linux-based 5-inch MID does several things right - its ostensibly chunky casing turning out to fit nicely into the hands, and some intuitively placed hardware controls like an optical trackpad - but in the end sluggish performance spoils the show.

Continue Reading

HP Mini Classmate PC Breaks Cover at Computex

HP Mini Classmate PC Breaks Cover at Computex

Are you one of the many just getting out of school? Or, perhaps you've been out of school for years, but you still wait patiently for all those back-to-school specials for other reasons. It's a great time for deals, surely, but it's also a great time to see what companies are working on for their appropriate markets. For example, we've got here the HP Mini Classmate PC, which, as far as we can tell, looks crafted as much as possible to be for the kids out there in need of a laptop.

Continue Reading

Google junk Windows after security breach

Google junk Windows after security breach

The biggest fall-out from Google's Chinese hack incident back in January could be on Microsoft's bottom line, as the search giant moves to vanquish Windows PCs from employee desks.  According to the FT's sources, Google is giving staff a choice between OS X and Linux, with one unnamed employee saying that "we’re not doing any more Windows. It is a security effort."  Google have declined to comment, but according to other employees "getting a new Windows machine now requires CIO approval."

Continue Reading

Realease Shogo Tablet is 10 Inches of Developer Goodness

Realease Shogo Tablet is 10 Inches of Developer Goodness

You might've looked at that title a few times, thinking we made a typo. Well, we didn't. Realease (real-ease) have just pulled the curtain off a brand new 10-inch tablet that runs on Linux, and is predominantly designed for all the developers out there that would like a more mobile way to design things. It's got a few options to make any tablet fan out there happy, so let's just dig right into it.

Continue Reading