legal

Apple files its response to court order, Google, Facebook to follow

Apple files its response to court order, Google, Facebook to follow

The heat hasn't cooled off in the fight between Apple and the FBI over the encrypted iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, a case that, due to the circumstances of the crime, has bled into mainstream media and divided not just companies but also citizens. Soon, however, the case might be taken to yet another step higher. Apple has just submitted it legal response to the federal court's order and, in turn, is asking the courts to vacate the order on the grounds that the government is overstepping its legal boundaries and is setting a chilling precedent.

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Microsoft President “wholeheartedly” supports Apple in FBI case

Microsoft President “wholeheartedly” supports Apple in FBI case

Another day, another new development in the encryption battle that's pitting Apple against the FBI. Earlier we saw comments from FBI Director James Comey on the situation. Namely, he didn't believe that the order given to Apple for this one instance will not open the door to future cases just like this one. Well now we're hearing that Apple is getting some help from an old rival.

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FBI’s backdoor iPhone access is just the beginning: Apple asked to open 9 new phones

FBI’s backdoor iPhone access is just the beginning: Apple asked to open 9 new phones

Apple's battle with the US government has been going on for around a week now, and it doesn't look as though there's any end in sight. There is a lot of debate as to whether Apple is in the right or wrong, with their stance on not unlocking the San Bernardino shooter's phone. However, it seems as though Apple has been right about at least one thing.

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Apple responds to questions about San Bernardino case

Apple responds to questions about San Bernardino case

What do you do when you're at work, and your boss asks you to do something that you find to be unethical? Maybe you go over his head, and talk with his boss, or even someone in HR. But what happens when the US government gives you an order to do something like that? If you're Apple, you can't really go over the government's head. But you can go to the people.

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FBI ordered San Bernardino county to reset shooter’s iPhone

FBI ordered San Bernardino county to reset shooter’s iPhone

If the consequences weren't so dire, the developments it the case of the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone are almost too comical to be real. The matter, however, is very serious, both for those whose lives were lost and affected in last year's shootings as well as for the future of mobile device legislation. In the most recent back and forth between the US government and Apple, the FBI finally acknowledged that it had a hand in getting the iPhone's iCloud password reset, and act which Apple claims has closed the doors on harvesting the device's data without requiring a backdoor.

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Kanye misses the point, seeks legal action against The Pirate Bay

Kanye misses the point, seeks legal action against The Pirate Bay

In case you missed the news earlier this week, Kanye West released a new album. Normally, a new album from a popular artist would create some ripples, but Kanye won't settle for anything less than Tidal waves. And now he's wanting to take on the most notorious of torrent sites.

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Why John McAfee’s offer to unlock San Bernardino iPhone makes sense

Why John McAfee’s offer to unlock San Bernardino iPhone makes sense

The biggest news this week isn't about some new device hitting the market, or a major technological breakthrough. Instead, it's about one older iPhone. While no one might think twice about an iPhone 5c, this phone could radically change the state of cybersecurity in our country, and even the world. This phone was once owned by the San Bernardino shooter, and at the moment, no one can unlock it.

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Microsoft makes modest statement in support of Apple over iPhone encryption

Microsoft makes modest statement in support of Apple over iPhone encryption

The news about the FBI ordering Apple to offer backdoor access to an iPhone belonging to a terrorist, along with Apple's subsequent refusal, has been dominating headlines this week. On an issue that's sure to prompt ongoing debate about encryption and privacy, several other tech giants are voicing their support for Apple's stance. It took a bit of time, but Google's Sundar Pichai tweeted his agreement with Tim Cook's open letter on encryption, along with Jan Koum, the founder of WhatsApp. Now Microsoft has spoken up, albeit in a moderate way.

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Google chief Sundar Pichai tweets in support of Apple, Cook

Google chief Sundar Pichai tweets in support of Apple, Cook

The tug of war between government and the tech industry over the question of encryption has been going on for months, perhaps even years now. But this latest case that involves the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooters is perhaps the tipping point of the debate. Snowden calls it the most important tech case of the decade and one that could, and most likely will, set a precedent for years to come. That is the "chilling" precedent that Apple is trying to fend off, and it won't be doing so alone. Joining the growing chorus, Google CEO Sundar Pichai took to Twitter to show his support of Tim Cook's letter to Apple customers.

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Apple letter outlines why it doesn’t want to give FBI an iOS backdoor

Apple letter outlines why it doesn’t want to give FBI an iOS backdoor

In their effort to collect data and evidence in the case against the terrorists who killed multiple people in San Bernadino last year the FBI has been working with Apple to gain access to the shooter's iPhone. Apple was ordered this week to disable autowipe on the iPhone collected as evidence in the case. Autowipe is a security feature that deletes data from the phone if the password is entered incorrectly too many times.

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Future Motion drops case against company raided at CES

Future Motion drops case against company raided at CES

During CES 2016, U.S. Marshals raided a booth belonging to Chinese company Changzhou First International Trade Co., doing so over its one-wheel electric scooter and alleged infringement of Future Motion’s Onewheel hoverboard. Now, and despite all that drama, Future Motion has quietly nixed its legal case against the Chinese company, which is itself going after Future Motion for damages as a result of the CES raid.

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American Airlines opens lawsuit against in-flight internet provider Gogo

American Airlines opens lawsuit against in-flight internet provider Gogo

If you're used to getting on an American Airlines flight and logging into Gogo for in-flight internet, things may be changing. The airline giant is thinking of switching internet providers, as they think they have found someone who can offer better service. So to get out of their contract with Gogo, they have filed a lawsuit against the company.

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