legal

Amazon sued by drivers challenging contractor status

That didn't take long. Less than a month after calling for delivery drivers, Amazon's drivers have followed in the same footsteps as Uber and Lyft drivers, suing the company for benefits. The lawsuit is part of a much larger issue, one that is being dealt with by several companies: whether drivers like those making Amazon's deliveries and picking up Uber riders should be classified as employees or contracted workers.

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15-year-old arrested in connection with TalkTalk hack

Last week, the UK telecom TalkTalk was hit with a cyberattack, and a short while later it revealed that a ransom had been made by an individual claiming to be behind the hack. The cyberattack was described as being “significant and sustained,” though later on it stated the attack wasn’t as bad as previously feared. Now a teenager has been arrested by law enforcement in Northern Ireland in connection to the cyberattack.

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Verizon seeks FCC permission for WiFi calling, following AT&T

Following all the hubbub early this month about AT&T requesting formal permission from the FCC to offer WiFi calling, and in turn complaining about rivals' doing so without permission, Verizon is now seeking the same from the regulatory agency. A FCC waiver is technically required, as WiFi calling doesn't support TTY (teletypewriter), an aging technology that helps those with hearing impairments, and is enforced by the FCC.

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FCC to turn the tables, publish telemarketers’ numbers

Telemarketers and robocallers aren't as big of a problem as they used to be, but they're still around, and they're still managing to call just as you sit down for dinner. The FCC has served on the front lines in the battle against them, and now it is planning to turn the tables, so to speak, and put telemarketers on the defense. The Commission has revealed plans to publish such spammers' phone numbers, making it easy to blacklist them.

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Amazon files lawsuit against hundreds of fake reviewers

The discerning Amazon user knows what to keep an eye out for: non-verified reviewers who sing praises about a scarcely-known product, loads of 5-star reviews that are all suspiciously short and similar, and other similar activities. The Web is full of sites where shady sellers can pay for fake Amazon reviews, and while the Internet retailer has implemented steps to combat them, it has just taken things a step further.

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Report: Dow Jones suffered second, more serious hack

On October 9, Dow Jones revealed that it had been hacked and data belonging to about 3500 customers had been compromised as a result. According to a new report, a Russian hacking collective has breached Dow Jones in what appears to be a separate attack; the information comes from unnamed sources “familiar with the matter.” The hackers’ intent was to steal data for trading purposes, according to the sources. Three federal agencies are reportedly investigating the matter.

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Uber sees London victory: High Court rules in favor

When Uber goes to court, it doesn't always prove successful. That hasn't been the case in London, however, where the ridesharing service's app was ruled legal by the High Court after the local taxi industry complained that the mobile software is the same as a taxi meter. The case had been brought by Transport for London due to the outcry from taxi drivers.

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Google’s decade-long Online Library case is over (for now)

An appeals court has agreed with a 2013 ruling by Judge Denny Chin that Google's digitization of 20 million books did not violate copyright laws. Google's snippet feature - or snippet view, if you prefer - shows only a tiny portion of any given book at a time. As such, it has been ruled that any reading of an entire book would be far too great an undertaking to consider realistic. "Snippet view," said the appeals court ruling, "at best and after a large commitment of manpower, produces discontinuous, tiny fragments, amounting in the aggregate to no more than 16% of a book."

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Swatting prankster gets a year in jail

Remember, folks -- a prank is only a prank if it is harmless. "Swatting", the act of calling in fake threats to get a SWAT team/law enforcement to raid someone's home, doesn't fall under that definition. It is a foolish, potentially deadly "prank" that can get someone seriously hurt and, at a minimum, ties up law enforcement services that may be needed elsewhere. States have started cracking down hard against such pranksters.

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Apple News blocked in China

China's Great Firewall has seemingly burnt another service, with Apple apparently opting to disable Apple News in the country rather than figure out a complex censorship system. The news-reading app was launched as part of iOS 9, pulling in articles from multiple sources into one, easy-to-consume place.

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