legal

Amazon at fault for in-app purchases by children, judge rules

Amazon at fault for in-app purchases by children, judge rules

We’ve all heard the horror stories. A parent lets their child play with a phone or tablet, only to find that their little darling managed to spend a large chunk of money on in-app purchases. Depending on just how much money was spent, this can be a pretty big problem. But the real question is who is to blame for this happening? A judge today ruled that when it comes to Amazon’s apps, they’re the ones at fault.

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Tweeting could cost jurors $1,500 under a new California bill

Tweeting could cost jurors $1,500 under a new California bill

I'm the kind of person that gets on Facebook a few times a day, just to check up on the lives of my friends and family that I don't get to see very often. However, some for some people, social media is a deeply integrated part of their life, that they can't seem to go without for more than a short period of time. If you're one of those people, and you happen to get selected for jury duty, then you might find yourself having to pay a hefty fine.

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FBI director hints agency paid more than $1.3m to unlock iPhone

FBI director hints agency paid more than $1.3m to unlock iPhone

Public information about the FBI’s method for unlocking the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone is slight, and so we’re forced to piece together what precious little information is available. Take, for example, FBI Director James Comey’s recent statement about how much the FBI had to pay to get the iPhone unlocked: more than he will make in the remainder of his time serving as the bureau’s director, which a little bit of math estimates as $1.3 million.

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Piracy could land you in jail for 10 years in the UK, in the future

Piracy could land you in jail for 10 years in the UK, in the future

Piracy has been an issue for as long as digital content has been available. VCR's were once thought to kill the TV and movie industry, and we were told to not copy that floppy in the 90's. However, ever since Napster made online piracy almost mainstream, courts have cracked down on the offenders, and hard.

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Google Books appeal is thrown out by the Supreme Court

Google Books appeal is thrown out by the Supreme Court

It's been a little while since we've heard anything about the Authors' Guild and their lawsuit against Google. The Guild sought legal action against the search engine giant for their Google Books project, in which they scanned millions of books. The reason we haven't heard much about this case in a while is because Google won the lawsuit back in 2013. But that didn't stop case from continuing.

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Shooting a drone is a federal offense, FAA confirms

Shooting a drone is a federal offense, FAA confirms

When a new piece of technology comes out and radically changes the market, there will always be people who are afraid of it. With the case of drones, this has lead to people having serious concerns about privacy. And in some cases, people have resorted to shooting down the flying gadgets to prove their point.

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Google, Oracle to head to court as settlement talks fall through

Google, Oracle to head to court as settlement talks fall through

Six hours. That's how long, or, to be more blunt, short settlement talks between tech giants Google and Oracle lasted. Given that duration, the outcome should probably already be evident. The the companies failed to reach a settlement regarding an ongoing copyright infringement lawsuit Oracle filed against Google for the use of its proprietary Java APIs in Android. As the settlement failed, the two will head back to court next month to perhaps once and for all give closure to both the actual question of infringement as well as damages to be paid. If any, that is.

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Why Microsoft just sued the US government

Why Microsoft just sued the US government

Microsoft has sued the United States government for the right to tell users when they are being spied on. The lawsuit was filed in a Seattle-based federal court today, and marks the latest battle between tech company and government over the state of consumer privacy. According to Microsoft’s lawsuit, preventing Microsoft and companies like it from notifying users about government data requests is in violation of the U.S. Constitution.

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Senator Franken clarifies his letter to Oculus

Senator Franken clarifies his letter to Oculus

Last week we reported that Senator Al Franken had sent a letter addressed to Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe. This happened not long after some rather interesting wording in the Oculus Rift Terms and Conditions led to concern from many consumers. While Oculus hasn't formally responded to the letter, we reached out to Senator Franken for comments on his letter.

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Uber transparency reports kick off with data on second half of 2015

Uber transparency reports kick off with data on second half of 2015

Uber has released its first transparency report, putting it among the ranks of dozens of companies that have rolled out similar reports. In this case, Uber’s transparency report has details on the latter half of 2015, letting the public see what kind of requests were received and what kind of information the company ended up supplying to others. As well, Uber says it is the first company to include regulatory requests among its transparency report information.

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‘Textalyzer’ bill wants cops to search phones for distracted drivers

‘Textalyzer’ bill wants cops to search phones for distracted drivers

A new bill has been introduced in New York that, if passed, would give police officers the authority to search a driver’s phone in the event of an accident. The bill speaks of a so-called ‘Textalyzer’ technology that will enable cops to “detect” if a cell phone was used “around the time of a crash” without giving them access to any personal data like phone numbers, chat logs, contacts, app data, or photographs. The technology is being developed by Cellebrite, the same company that helped the FBI unlock an iPhone without Apple's help.

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New bill will force companies to unlock phones in ‘timely’ manner

New bill will force companies to unlock phones in ‘timely’ manner

Earlier today, a new bill proposed by Senators Richard Burr and Diane Feinstein was published that seeks to force companies to unlock phones for law enforcement when ordered to do so. The bill has already been criticized as excessively vague (and therefore broad) in scope, and the Obama administration has reportedly stated it will not support the bill. While the legislation doesn't propose penalties against companies that can't provide the requested data or assistance, it will require them to hand over or unlock data and devices if they have the technical means to do so.

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