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FTC hits back; Google investigation integrity questioned again

FTC hits back; Google investigation integrity questioned again

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is coming out against statements made last week by the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), as well as new claims that Google had used its political ties to the Obama administration to obtain a favorable outcome in the FTC investigation into alleged anti-trust and unfair internet search practices. The FTC states that such claims are unfounded and undermine the integrity of its investigation, while the WSJ is giving weight to the idea that anti-trust investigation might not have had much integrity on the FTC's part at all.

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RadioShack to sell 117 million customers’ data in bankruptcy auction

RadioShack to sell 117 million customers’ data in bankruptcy auction

RadioShack might not be worth much as a company, but it is about to sell a goldmine of customer information to the highest bidder. Discounting its own longstanding privacy policies, RadioShack is serving up customers' personal information as part of a court-supervised auction as it try to pay off its $1.3 billion debt. RadioShack filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, which means it is reorganizing the company in the process. There is no word how much RadioShack claims the data is worth, but it is a marketable asset up for grabs as they madly sell assets and restructure the company.

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First lawsuits against FCC’s net neutrality are filed

First lawsuits against FCC’s net neutrality are filed

The FCC just announced its ruling on net neutrality last month, and lawsuits are hitting the agency right off the bat. The FCC declared that the Internet is a utility, which allows the government to regulate it. As such, the FCC created net neutrality rules which treat all web traffic equally. Well, no one likes being told what to do, especially by the government. The telecom industry is up in arms over the FCC's net neutrality ruling, and now the lawsuits are beginning to trickle in. These lawsuits are part of an industry-wide effort to overturn what private companies believe are the FCC's unlawful regulations.

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Twitter hit with gender discrimination class action lawsuit

Twitter hit with gender discrimination class action lawsuit

A class action lawsuit was filed against Twitter late last week in San Francisco, with a former software engineer alleging the company's promotion process is discriminatory towards women. This comes at a time when such lawsuits are becoming common in Silicon Valley, as a separate legal complaint was also filed recently against Facebook by a former employee claiming gender discrimination. In the Twitter case, Tina Huang, who worked for the company between 2009 and 2014, says she was passed over for a Senior Staff Engineer position for no good reason.

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BMW settles with the FTC over restrictive Mini warranties

BMW settles with the FTC over restrictive Mini warranties

Consumer warranties can be tricky. They are ideally designed to protect the consumer, but are mostly written by companies to protect their own interests and profit margin. BMW's auto warranties were scrutinized by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) which lead to an official complaint from the FTC. BMW of North America is settling with the FTC over their administrative complaint that BMW's Mini car division restricted its customers freedom to choose after-market auto parts and individual repair garages over Mini's official dealerships. In order to avoid a possibly long and drawn out court battle against the regulatory agency, BMW decided to settle.

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FTC report: Google caused ‘real harm to consumers’

FTC report: Google caused ‘real harm to consumers’

A 160 page FTC report from a couple years ago has made the light of day through an open-records request, and in it we see Google held in a harsh, often damning light. The report reveals that it was recommended that the FTC sue Google over three of the Internet giant's practices, something that would have -- had it gone through -- ended up being one of the biggest antitrust cases since the similar suit against Microsoft in the 90s. Among other things, the report says Google both has and will harm consumers and innovation with some of its actions.

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Verizon settles with FCC over last year’s 911 outage

Verizon settles with FCC over last year’s 911 outage

In April of last year, multiple states experienced 911 service outages, and as part of that Verizon in particular had an outage in California that affected about 750,000 people and 13 different call centers. The outage took place for several hours, and Verizon did not notify officials about it as it was required to do. This spurred an investigation into the matter, something that has been going on for a while now and that was recently settled between the two entities.

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Twitter adds new feature for reporting tweets to police

Twitter adds new feature for reporting tweets to police

Among Twitter's latest efforts to combat trolls and the other abusive users on its platform is a new method for reporting threats to the police. The social network has just rolled out the feature, adding it as an option on the screen that is presented when filing a report about a threatening tweet. The new feature is available today, and utilizes the user's own email address to provide a stock notice for law enforcement containing all of the relevant information.

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Lyft sued by drivers claiming they were stiffed out of bonuses

Lyft sued by drivers claiming they were stiffed out of bonuses

If you've toyed with the idea of driving for Lyft, arguably the second best-known ridesharing service, there's a good chance you've seen some sort of incentive, such as a promised bonus for signing on or, if you're an existing driver, a bonus for getting someone else to sign up. Some drivers are complaining that they've been stiffed out of the bonuses they were promised, however, and now two have had a lawsuit against the company filed on their behalf in California.

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Lawsuit against Facebook over kids’ purchases to proceed

Lawsuit against Facebook over kids’ purchases to proceed

Facebook has to face up to a class-action lawsuit from parents whose children made purchases on the social network without their permission, a judge has ruled. The order came today from U.S. District Judge Beth Labson Freeman, who gave the go-ahead to the class-action lawsuit seeking alterations to how Facebook goes about kids' transactions. The lawsuit will not, however, be able to go after a refund -- those who are looking to get a refund will need to go after that alone.

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