legal

Florida rules police need warrant to nab cell location data

Florida rules police need warrant to nab cell location data

Your everyday devices, particularly smartphones, betray aspects of your privacy in many ways, not the least of which is transmitting location information that law enforcement, among others, has regularly used in the pursuit of suspects. Such activity has caused vast outcries about privacy concerns and rights violations, something Florida has taken to heart. In a recent ruling, the state's Supreme Court has decided that police must get a warrant before using cell tower data to get location information on individuals.

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Apple sapphire glass provider to lay off hundreds in US

Apple sapphire glass provider to lay off hundreds in US

Layoffs are nothing new in the tech world, they happen regularly as companies pare down to help maximize profits. A big round of layoffs has now been announced for a company operating out of Mesa, Arizona that provides sapphire glass to Apple for certain products. The company is called GT Advanced Technologies and it filed for bankruptcy protection last week. On Thursday, the manufacturer announced plans for massive layoffs at the factory.

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Comcast sued by the subscriber it got fired

Comcast sued by the subscriber it got fired

Comcast, the company many love to hate, was the subject of a somewhat bizarre customer complaint earlier this month. In case you missed it, the general plot revolves around a comedy of errors in which former subscriber Conal O'Rourke was hit with phantom charges that would not disappear and sent a lot of hardware he did not request. According to O'Rourke, he tried valiantly to have the issues corrected, but after months of effort and lots of promises, nothing was ultimately done about the issues. As a result, the at-the-time customer escalated the issue to the office of the Comcast Controller. Unfortunately for O'Rourke, Comcast decided to escalate the issue, too.

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Court rules parents can be held responsible for kid’s Facebook posts

Court rules parents can be held responsible for kid’s Facebook posts

Kids are notorious for saying dumb things, and now that communication has shifted towards a digital medium, those dumb things are often posted for everyone to see. If a new court ruling is any indication, parents may be held responsible for any legally dubious thing their child posts in the future, whether it is a fake threat or very real cyber bullying. Such is the case for two individuals in Georgia, where a court as ruled that they could be held responsible for a fake Facebook page operated by their son.

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Dorian Nakamoto starts legal fund to sue Newsweek

Dorian Nakamoto starts legal fund to sue Newsweek

Bitcoin is the most well known and popular of all the virtual currencies out there, it's also the one worth the most real money. Since bitcoin first hit the market people have been looking for the person who invented the currency. In March of this year, Newsweek published a story claiming that a man named Dorian Nakamoto from California was the founder of bitcoin, a claim that Nakamoto has denied since the story first surfaced.

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Flight attendants take FAA to court to reinstate ban on electronics use

Flight attendants take FAA to court to reinstate ban on electronics use

Remember how pleased frequent travelers were late last year when the Federal Aviation Administration finally started allowing airline passengers to use their personal electronic devices during takeoff and landing? Well, it turns out there's one group of people who aren't very happy with the change, and are now trying to get the ban on smartphones and tablets put back in place. Flight attendants have taken the FAA to the U.S. Court of Appeals with their main concern being the issue of safety.

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Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Tokyo court orders Google to delete crime-implying search results

Google was ordered by the Tokyo District Court this week to delete a number of search results that a Japanese man claimed tied him to criminal activity he was not involved in. The decision comes not long after a European court ruled that internet users have the "Right to be Forgotten," forcing Google to accept requests for deleting URLs to misleading or false information from their search results.

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NSA refuses to reveal what it has leaked

NSA refuses to reveal what it has leaked

A lot of information has been leaked about the government and its various agencies, not the least of which being the NSA. Of course, not all leaks are unauthorized -- the government itself will leak its own information at times, the reasons for which are varied and, despite requests otherwise, still secret. A recent Freedom of Information Act request for information about what leaks the government has made was denied due to claims of posing a potential threat to national security.

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Lindsay Lohan suit over GTA V beefed up by legal team

Lindsay Lohan suit over GTA V beefed up by legal team

Lindsay Lohan is one of those celebrities that are better known for self-imploding than for her acting these days. One of the things that gamers might know her for is her legal campaign against Take-Two Interactive over what she claims is her likeness used in promotional materials for the game without her consent. The original legal complaint was a 10-page offering and her legal team has now beefed up that complaint by filing a new 67 page document with courts.

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Panel says NSA surveillance is a threat to the Internet’s survival

Panel says NSA surveillance is a threat to the Internet’s survival

Imagine a future where a single unified Internet no longer exists, instead being replaced by locked down local versions that exist, primarily, to keep prying eyes away from data that is private. Such is one possibility posed by current government Internet surveillance, largely resting on the NSA's shoulders, according to a panel that recently gathered to discuss the issue. Senator Ron Wyden set up the discussion panel, and many big-name individuals from within the tech industry took part, including Google's Eric Schmidt and Microsoft's General Counsel Brad Smith. The topic is a serious one, and dire warnings were given.

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