legal

Comcast facing class-action lawsuit over WiFi hotspots

Comcast facing class-action lawsuit over WiFi hotspots

Earlier this year, Comcast caught public attention with its home-based WiFi Hotspot network, which utilizes some subscribers' hardware to broadcast a second WiFi signal for other Comcast subscribers to use. As Comcast told us back in June, this secondary usage is tied to the user's own account, not the home subscriber's account. Many still have issues with the feature, however, and now Comcast is facing a class-action lawsuit over it.

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Uber hit with lawsuit in LA and San Francisco

Uber hit with lawsuit in LA and San Francisco

Uber's strong-armed business tactics -- namely, launching its service in places it is not welcome -- are causing a growing backlash from cities against the ridesharing service. Portland wasted no time filing a lawsuit against Uber after its sudden arrival, India has banned the service, and Thailand is being less than welcoming. Now both Los Angeles and San Francisco have moved forward with their own lawsuit over what are said to be violations of state law, issues with the company's background checks, fees they say amount to fraud, and more.

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Uber’s problem extend to Thailand as service deemed illegal

Uber’s problem extend to Thailand as service deemed illegal

Uber is no stranger to articles like this one. Time and again, the ride-sharing company falls victim to articles that paint it in a less-than-glowing light, all set in motion by their own actions. Yesterday, the city of Portland, Oregon sued Uber to halt services, where Uber was legally prohibited from operating. Now, aspects of Uber’s business model have been ruled illegal in Thailand, according to The Wall Street Journal. That might sound fishy, but the parts deemed illegal are the same found offensive stateside.

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Portland sues Uber over unapproved launch

Portland sues Uber over unapproved launch

This past Friday, Uber announced its arrival in Portland, OR, with the ridesharing service sending out drivers to pick up riders without city approval. Portland officials immediately denounced the move, threatening to go after drivers and to "throw the book at" Uber. That didn't deter the service, however, which encouraged its drivers to start working in the city despite the risks. Merely one weekend later, Portland has filed a lawsuit against Uber.

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iPod court case may be tossed due to lack of device

iPod court case may be tossed due to lack of device

When you launch a lawsuit against a device manufacturer like Apple, it's important that you actually own the device you're complaining about. Attorneys for Apple have contended this week that the two women named as plaintiffs in the iPod court case this week did not own iPods in the time frame the case is covering. This case concerns iPods purchased between September of 2006 and March of 2009, while the iPods these plaintiffs owned were purchased after that time - July of 2009, in one case.

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Apple denied App Store trademark in Australia

Apple denied App Store trademark in Australia

Apple has been fighting to trademark the App Store name in Australia for a while now. The electronics firm lost the original case to trademark App Store last March and Apple filed an appeal with the court. Apple has now lost that appeal in Australia as the Register of Trade Marks in that country has denied Apple again.

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Cox Communications sued by music publishers

Cox Communications sued by music publishers

Cox Communications is one of the largest cable and internet providers in the country. Cox has found itself in the middle of a legal battle with a pair of music publishers after Cox refused to disconnect persistent music pirates. Rightscorp is involved in the case and claims that ISPs lose safe harbor protections if they fail to take action against users on their service that repeatedly violate copyright law.

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Google should be broken up vote Euro lawmakers

Google should be broken up vote Euro lawmakers

Europe has passed a ruling calling for Google to be broken up, among other things, with politicians concerned that huge, dominant firms like the Silicon Valley giant could end up abusing their position. The vote today at the European Parliament focused on how search functionality should be unbundled from other commercial services, in an effort to reduce the potential of access being abused. While Google wasn't specifically singled out by name, the search giant is nonetheless top of the hit-list given it's responsible for around 90-percent of all queries by European web users.

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Takata airbag fight escalates as feds set ultimatum

Takata airbag fight escalates as feds set ultimatum

The fall-out from the Takata airbag recall continues to intensify, with US federal safety regulators giving the Japanese company a deadline to take responsibility for the flawed safety tech and agree to a national replacement program. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) had told Takata earlier this month that it wanted all cars in the US fitted with the potentially dangerous airbags to be recalled, but the parts firm has held off from complying, likely because of the associated cost and legal liabilities for the millions of vehicles that would impact. Now, the NHTSA is putting its foot down.

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Samsung demands NVIDIA sales ban in patent retort

Samsung demands NVIDIA sales ban in patent retort

Samsung has shown it's not afraid to chase big legal injunctions when it believes its patents are at stake, and now it's NVIDIA facing a US sales block at the hands of the South Korean firm. A complaint filed on Friday asks the US International Trade Commission to shut down sales of NVIDIA's graphics chips, alleging they infringe Samsung's own intellectual property. As with Apple, however, Samsung didn't actually pull the trigger first: it was NVIDIA which kicked off this particular war.

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